about me

    Emily Malone

    culinary arts grad. nutrition facts lover. vegetarian chef. marathon runner. country music maniac. failed dog trainer. barre fanatic. loving mama.

    Contact Emily

    EmilyBMalone@gmail.com

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    5K - 23:28

    10K - 52:35

    15K - 1:38:14

    1/2 Marathon - 1:57:39

    Marathon - 3:50:58

    A Look Back.



Lessons Learned On a 100 Degree Run.

Good day for a 15 mile run, right? 

Capture

This run ended up being a FAIL, but not for the reasons I was expecting.  We were up nice and early, but then we ate breakfast really slow and dawdled too much, so we didn’t end up at the trail until around 9:30am – when the sun was already beating down.  But we were prepared with LOTS of homemade sports drink and ice cold water. 

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Casey is awesome and has re-arranged his running schedule so that he can do my long runs with me, and he does his on Tuesdays.  I know, I am very lucky.  :)  The two of us set out with a strategy to ensure we would have water every three miles.  And with that…

Lesson #1: Fueling/Hydrating During Runs

I get a LOT of emails from readers asking about the best ways to fuel and get enough water during long runs.  I always wish I had a better answer, as this is something that I still struggle with myself.  I know that for some people, carrying water on them is the best solution.  I have tried the fuel belt, CamelBak, and just simply carrying a water bottles, and I absolutely can’t stand any of them.  For me, the weight and sloshiness of carrying water is not an option – it drives me crazy.  So instead, I choose to plan my runs around water fountains or water bottles. 

Typically, I either leave a water bottle on my front porch and loop around to it, or I take one to the trail with me and leave it halfway along my route (keep reading…).  While I know that other strategies have worked for many other runners, this just happens to be what works best for me.  Today we planned to run out and back on a 6 mile trail, leaving a bottle at the 3 mile halfway point, and with water options on both ends of the trail itself.

We started off strong, and I felt pretty good.  Yes I was DYING in the heat, but that brings me to my next lesson…

Lesson #2: Dealing With the Heat

This is another one that I struggle with, but I’m doing my best to figure it out run by run.  Now I may get some criticism for this, but my personal belief is that you physically can run in any condition, as long as you are careful and well prepared.  Today I ran 12 miles in 100 degree heat.  Was it fun?  No.  Did I die or even come close to it?  Absolutely not.

Knowing that it was insanely hot, and running half the time in full sun, I knew that the only way to have a successful run was to not over-do it and slow my pace.  It is always frustrating to run slower than you know you can run, but in extreme conditions you need to adapt your pace to the environment.  So today, despite my wishes to run faster, I stuck to a slower pace.  I even took walking breaks!  A lot of times I beat myself up for needing to take walking breaks, but on a day like today, I knew it was important if I wanted to finish the run and not bonk halfway through.  Which brings me to…

Lesson #3:  How to Get Faster

Another very popular question!  Between my first marathon and my third marathon (we won’t talk about marathon #2), I shaved 46 minutes off my finishing time.  How did I do it?  A combination of the following:

Strength training – running is soooo much more than just putting one foot in front of the other.  Doing weights consistently 3x a week gave me a very strong core and upper body, that carried me through the final miles when my legs had nothing left to give.

Losing weight – it should come as no surprise that the more you weigh, the more effort it takes to move your body.  But the more I moved, little by little more weight came off, and with each pound I lost, my pace continued to drop.

Running with a fast partner – For many of my shorter runs, Casey and I would run together, and by having him (super speed demon) run with me it encouraged me to try to pick up my pace.  I have never personally joined a running group, but I imagine they are helpful in a very similar way.

Make it hurtThis is probably my most important piece of running advice (not that you asked for it).  So often I hear stories of people telling me that when they try to get faster they are out of breath, or their legs hurt too much, etc. – I know this sounds harsh, but here’s how I see it.  Running is not supposed to feel good.  A casual jog?  Sure, that can be relaxing and nice.  But training towards a specific pace or goal?  That shouldn’t feel so good.  You should be out of breath, and you should be hurting by the end – that means you are pushing your body to a new level.  If running is comfortable, your body isn’t being asked to do something new.  As you get faster and faster, your body will become comfortable with the new pace or distance – and then it’s time to push it faster or further once again.  That is how you get better.  You have to push your body to the limit. 

Of course I am not talking about injuring yourself – that is an entirely different discussion.  But you can tell the difference between an injury and just general discomfort, and discomfort is necessary to achieve your best results.  I assure you, it is worth it for the way you feel both inside and outside at the end. 

So speaking of discomfort, back to today’s run.  We ran out to the 3 mile marker and left our water bottle on a bench – something I have done many many times.  At that point I also decided I was sweating too much and didn’t want my sunglasses sliding off my face any longer, so I decided to leave them tucked right under my water bottle.  I figured that leaving our things on the bench on a trail filled with many of our fellow runners and bikers on a sunny Sunday afternoon would be just fine.  We carried on…

We reached the end of the trail at 6 miles stopped in a CVS for 2 bottles of ice cold water – one to drink and one to dump all over my head and body.  We also grabbed some scary gummy bears for a little sugar boost.  We headed back feeling energized from the sugar and cooled down from the water, and trucked along from miles 6 to 9.  When we got to mile marker 3, I immediately noticed that the bench previously occupied by my beloved sunglasses and sports drink was now empty.  Casey always tells me that I am far too trusting, but I guess I just like to hope for the best in people. 

For some reason I got REALLY pissed.  I was hot and I had already run 3 miles without water.  On top of that,
my beautiful Anthropologie sunglasses had been stolen by someone with no soul.  We stopped to walk and I did a bit of crying, dropping the f-bomb no less than 100 times over the course of the next ten minutes.  The last 3 miles were slow and painful – I was really mad, thirsty, and my spirit was totally deflated.  We did a lot of walking.  Who just TAKES a water bottle and sunglasses?  And WHY?  Oh well…

Lesson #4:  Don’t leave valuable things on public benches.

I guess this lesson was obvious.  I just hate that on a sunny Sunday afternoon, and on a busy trail with no access to street traffic, I couldn’t trust a bunch of fellow runners and bikers to not steal my things. 

We got back to the car at 12 miles, and with the heat reaching the peak for the day – 1oo sweltering degrees.  I wanted documentation that I did, in fact, run – but couldn’t find it in me to smile.

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Listening to my body, I knew I didn’t have three more miles in me at that temperature, so we called it a day and I quit my run after 12 miles.  Overall result?  FAIL.

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But considering the conditions, and the fact that I was actually doing pretty well until I was violated by a thief, I was pleased to have successfully covered even 12 miles.  Next weekend I will leave my house earlier, store my belongings locked in my car, and cover all of my mileage.

Lesson learned.

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92 Comments so far
Leave a comment

MA*     at 5:23 pm

Jillian says… “if you want to make a change, get comfortable being uncomfortable!”

I’ll put out an APB on your sg’s (or just send you mine!) xo

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MaI     at 5:25 pm

I had a similar run tidy. I am in a cut-back week for half marathon training and therefore only had five miles to run. Thinking pssshh five miles is nothing I headed out at noon. Now I did go down to the beach, so there was a breeze coming off the water, and up here in Vancouver it was only 85 today, but I forgot a few key details: I am a pacific-northwester, 85 degrees might as well be 120 when you are used to a steady 50. 2. The beach has no shade, and I don’t own a hat, and at noon the sun is beating down. 3 it was a sunny, sunny sunday, everyone imaginable was down at the beach therefore the water fountain lines were INSANE, and I am not patient enough to wait in lines.

The result? A very slow five miles, with a few walking breaks included. I too struggle not to beat myself up for taking walking breaks… But I am starting to come to the conclusion that sometimes, in certain circumstances, they are necessary.

Congrats on completing the 12 in 100 degree heat nevertheless! I would have likely thrown in the towel much sooner, so go you !

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

thanks! glad you survived yur run despite the heat too. sometimes you just have to slow down!

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Becky     at 5:27 pm

There was someone else on the trail today who gets the “FAIL!” and it wasn’t you. You pushed through 12 solid miles…that’s nothing short of fabulous! I’m sorry your run ended on such a sour note. Hope your day is getting better!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

haha YES – the theif was definitely the big FAIL of the day. Thanks! :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

ummm that would be thief. :)

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Annie@stronghealthyfit     at 5:30 pm

12 miles is a LOT. Don’t be so hard on yourself, even if it was 3 miles short of what you were planning on doing.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks Annie! I was glad to have finished the 12 miles – just hope I get all the mileage in next week!

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Allie     at 5:39 pm

oh man, that stinks about your sunglasses and water. it’s sad you can’t trust people.
i did 14 miles in high 90s and it was pretty brutal. a full minute slower per mile than usual, at least. i also just cannot get used to carrying any hydration, so i have to plan around fountains and stores. i ended my run at whole foods and bought 24 of the new flavored bars out of total heat delerium.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Hahahahah that is hilarious. Now you have lots of post-run snacks!

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Meagan     at 5:57 pm

That’s considered a failure? Are you kidding! 12 miles in 100 degrees is AMAZING! And don’t beat yourself up over the sunglasses, as you realized after you probably shouldn’t have been so trusting! Congratulations on 12 miles though!

Do you get lots of bugs down south? Up here in New England they are HORRIBLE and sometimes I plan my runs or don’t plan my runs around the bugs!! Annoying hardly begins to describe it.

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Laine @ Beets, Butter and Mountaintops Reply:

I feel your pain. I’m in Mass. but when I head to NH or Maine to hike I have to bathe in deet before hand. And often wish I brought a head net.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

The failure was having my stuff stolen, not my run. I just wished I’d had my water so I could have finished all 15 miles. Thank you :)

No bugs where I run THANK GOD! I seriously HATE bugs.

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Nicole     at 6:02 pm

That is frustrating! I accidently left my nasty, dirty running hat hanging in the YMCA locker room shower one day and yes, you guessed it, somebody stole it. I had the same reaction as you–who does that??!!

As far as your run goes, cut yourself some slack. I live in Charlotte and the devil himself wouldn’t have been outside today. Just think, Fall is around the corner!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

That is disgusting. I can’t wait for fall! :)

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Jen     at 6:09 pm

Cannot believe someone stole your glasses and water bottle! That person is sick. You’d have to be to steal someone’s water on such a hot day. You still rocked the run though! And aaaah I need to get strength training.

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jenny in new york     at 6:10 pm

ahh i could never trust people where i live (NYC). That’s upsetting that they took your stuff…… why would they want your water???

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Christina     at 6:27 pm

Too bad about your stuff.
Have you considered running with a hat? I use a “headsweats” one but any moisture-wicking light-colored one would do. It would keep your whole head cooler and keep the sun off your face. It makes a huge difference!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Sometimes I do, but I like to have my hair up off my neck, so if anything I will do a visor. I probably should have worn one yesterday!

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Dorry     at 6:36 pm

No! How frustrating. I’m so sorry someone took your things. Can you imagine just taking someone’s sunglasses and water bottle? I hope you can look back and be proud of your 12 miles! I ran 3 this morning and it was so incredibly hot. I love this post and what you said about pushing yourself to get better and see improvements. I’m like you in that I don’t like taking walk breaks…sometimes I can just slow the pace but other times walking is a necessity. :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I’m definitely proud of the 12, no worries. :)

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Kristina     at 6:37 pm

That is such a success! 12 miles in those conditions…you’re a rockstar in my book! =)

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Shauna     at 6:41 pm

Emily,

Your absolutely amazing. I would have been pissed too. And it was not a fail. Girl, you never fail unless you quit and you did not quit. Keep that head up and those spirits too. :-)

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Emily     at 6:49 pm

Having stuff stolen is never fun, but I always find a way to comfort myself about it. Ie: Maybe it was necessary. Have you ever had sunburned eyes? IT HURTS. So maybe someone else was foolish and forgot their drink and sunglasses. Spent too much time in the sun and had their eyes sunburned and couldn’t go any further without them. Now, you wouldn’t deny a lobster sunscreen would you? Maybe that person needed the sunglasses. And said person was also severely dehydrated so grabbed the bottle of sports drink and consumed it so that they wouldn’t pass out.

And if that situation is true, you might find your sunglasses and water bottle at the bench next week.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Haha I HOPE you are kidding. :) Even if someone who WAS dehydrated came along and decided they needed my water, they left ME dehydrated 3 miles out on the trail!

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beth     at 7:00 pm

maybe you could leave a note on the bench or the trailhead that you’re missing sunglasses and a water bottle and leave your email address. I can’t imagine why someone would take those things (esp the water bottle – kinda gross to take a stranger’s water), but maybe they’d see the note, realize you didn’t just forget them there, and return them.

I know that’s a long shot, but personally it would make me feel a little better knowing the person who took them might at least see the sign and feel a pang of guilt.

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Laine @ Beets, Butter and Mountaintops     at 7:01 pm

I would be afraid that someone would spit in my water. Which is why I carry what feels like 15 pounds of it when I bike. It gets consumed quick enough and nothing kills a good bike ride like not enough water. I think I would cry and swear if someone stole my stuff.

And I agree about the not feeling good part. As long as I’m adequately hydrated and not injured, I try to push myself beyond where I feel comfortable. If it’s in yoga class, I breathe into the space, if it’s on my bike I trust that the bike is in good shape (I sometimes have visions of the chain snapping and pedals coming off, which really isn’t going to happen) and I visualize Lance Armstrong or Contador and I keep going.

That said, I’m in this for the long haul, so I’m not going to do something stupid that will injure me (and dehydration and heat stroke can definitely cause long lasting damage.) Check out this NY Times article: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/15/health/nutrition/15best.html

You were smart to stop when you did.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I have thought about the spitting before too. So gross. I also have weird fears about my bike falling apart!

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Susan     at 7:32 pm

It could just be that someone thought you forgot your things. Maybe check craigslist lost & found?

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Chelsey     at 8:00 pm

I am far too trusting as well – I think it’s just something we bloggies have in common. I definitely would have left my stuff there too. Seriously, who takes stuff like that? Stinkin people!!!

I’m sorry your run was a fail in your mind.. but in my mind, YOU RAN 12 MILES IN 100 DEGREE WEATHER! You go girl!Q

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thank you! :) My run was only a fail because I didn’t have the water I’d planned to drink. Oh well!

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Sarah     at 8:20 pm

Emily- I’ve been reading your blog for a while and just wanted to thank you for this post. I too am training for the Chicago Marathon (my first!) during the crazy heat and every little bit of motivation helps. Sorry to hear about your things being taken, ugh! Thanks for the lessons and tips…it’s helpful to know that while you are struggling to finish a training run, many others may be too! :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Chicago is SUCH a fun marathon! Hopefully your weather is cooler than mine up there. We can all struggle and get through it together – that’s why I love blogs! :)

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Catherine     at 9:18 pm

Man, I hate that you can’t even leave sunglasses and a water bottle in a park without someone shady taking them! That sucks :( I know the run was deemed a fail but at least you got in 12!

Also, I agree with you on the discomfort part. Sometimes you just have to be uncomfortable and gross for a bit to get better. I think that’s part of life in general, not just running :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

totally agree.

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Jess @ NZ Girl Runs     at 9:19 pm

Maybe a kind runner thought they had been forgotten? Check with running stores etc, someone may have taken them somewhere in the hopes that you would claim them?

I also try to see the best in people :)

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Chelsea (Chelsea's Chew and Run Fun)     at 9:49 pm

Excellent running tips! I’m slowing getting back into the game and am easily discouraged from running because of the “it’s too late, too hot” excuse. I’m so sorry to hear about your water bottle and sunglasses, that is a very senseless theft. Either that, or someone thought it was misplaced.

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kATH     at 9:53 pm

You look hot.

In a smokin’ way.

In a cool way :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

You are a goof. And I like it.

xoxo

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Anne @ the doctor takes a wife     at 10:06 pm

Dang girl, I don’t know how you did it!! Hubby and I can’t bring ourselves to run in the Texas heat unless it’s 6 am and the sun hasn’t come up yet :-D

I think the lesson about how pushing your body to a new level SHOULDN’T FEEL GOOD is really important. As running gets easier for me, I find myself slipping into my comfort zone/pace and then I get ticked when I can’t actually go faster. Well duh…

Thanks for reminding myself to push it to the grind ;)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

You’re welcome! Thank YOU :)

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Kate     at 11:41 pm

A HUGE number of endurance and running coaches disagree with you on how hard to push. In base building, most coaches agree that your heart rate should be in your low aerobic zone, which feels ridiculously easy. Saying “it’s not supposed to be easy” goes against a huge bank of training philosophy.. Sure not everyone agrees, but a large number of coaches do (Mark Allen, Arthur Lydiard, Maffetone, Jack Daniels- from the top of my head, at least)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks for your comment! Like I said, I knew I would get some criticism for my thoughts. Perhaps the difference or misunderstanding here is that I’m not talking about base building. I’m talking about people who already run regularly and comfortably, and who want to push their speed or distance to the next level. I know that Lydiard was a big advocate for hill repeats, which in my opinion are NOT comfortable!! :)

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Kate Reply:

That’s definitely true, though I was talking about base building on a season by season basis, not something for first time marathoners, or those who aren’t used to running regularly. I’ve been running regularly since 2003, and my coach still has me doing steady runs for the first few months of the season. The main thing I take from all of the above coaching philsophies is to run my hard runs hard (hill reps, speedwork, etc) and to keep my steady runs, including my LSD run slow. I think it’s really valuable, though I do respect (obviously) that not everyone agrees with it- one of the main things I like is that it takes the pressure off the every day runs, so you can focus on endurance on those days.

So right now, I run about a 1:50 half marathon. I run my long runs and my steady runs somewhere in the high 9:00s/low 10:00s per mile, and keep my HR at or below 155. Then I ramp it up for speedwork, and I run my 200s at sub 6:00 pace… I have noticed that a lot of bloggers (not saying for a second that you’re included) tend to focus on running a good pace for every run, sometimes forgetting what the purpose of each run is.

Sorry for the incomplete thought before!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Ahh that definitely makes more sense. I do all my long runs muuuuch slower. It keeps me sane. By the way – you are FAST! :) Sub 6? I can’t even imagine.

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Stacey @ Tipping the (Kitchen!) Scales     at 2:35 am

Good post. I would like to increase my pace but hate the way that running faster makes me feel so unfit and useless! Sometimes it’s easier to stick with what you know you can do! Too bad someone stole your things, that sucks!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog     at 6:01 am

I agree that a mix of runs and a good training plan are the best way to train for something. I just mean that if you want to get your body comfortable with a faster pace, you have to be uncomfortable in the process. Thanks for your encouragement! :)

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Peggy     at 6:32 am

I’m marathon training in Bloomington, and, while it’s not quite that hot, we’ve been having high 90s with heat indexes of 100+ in the afternoons (which for this northern Californian might as well be the surface of the sun). The only thing that’s making it possible for me is to get out early, most days before 7. On Saturday, long run day, my alarm went off at 5:30, and I was 15 miles done, showered, rehydrated, and back in bed with the lights off at 10:30. It does suck to get up that early, but the run itself is so much more pleasant, and I can stay on pace. I know it is totally possible to run in any weather, but be careful! It’s a myth that heatstroke only affects dehydrated runners-I’ve gone to the emergency room after collapsing during a run where I was drinking plenty, but still overheating. Good luck, congrats on making it through that run, and be safe!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Scary!! I’m definitely planning to get up earlier from now on. When we left I kept thinking, if I had run at 5am I’d be done by now!

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Emily     at 6:34 am

Didn’t you hear, it’s officially bad run week! :P You are inspiring and thanks for the reminder about pushing it to uncomfortable! I’m afraid to do that sometimes so that was exactly what I needed to hear after struggling with a slow stinky run this morning!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Haha, I needed that. Thank you!

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Kim     at 8:20 am

I think 12 miles in full heat like that is more than 12 miles in more comfortable conditions. Good job!

I always tuck my water bottle behind a tree or something. Not super hidden, but enough out of the way that people might not notice it? Still, I understand your frustration. I would have been one pissed cookie.

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Whitney     at 8:23 am

I set out at 5 am Saturday morning for 10 miles and it was hot, but bearable. I could not imagine what you felt like running at 9:30 am. I have learned to get your mileage in during these hot summer months, you have to suck it up and get out there very very early! :)

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Lindsay @ The Ketchup Diaries     at 8:44 am

Not a fail, girl. You did what you could under the conditions. And, I will say a small prayer that whoever took your stuff harshly stubs his/her toe today :wink:

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Haha YES! The only FAIL was that stupid thief.

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Amanda     at 8:48 am

Thanks for the running advice!

I usually do not eat anything before running but find sometimes I wish I would have during a run. How long do you wait before you run after you eat? and what are the homemade sports drinks you talked about at the beginning of this post?

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Callie     at 8:50 am

I just wanted to tell you that I shaved over a minute off my 3 mile run time this morning because I kept thinking about this post. I kept thinking about how you said, “You should be out of breath, and you should be hurting by the end – that means you are pushing your body to a new level.” I really pushed my pace today and despite the discomfort, I felt GREAT when I finished because I knew I had given it everything I had! Thanks for the encouragement!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

That is AWESOME! One minute is a LOT! Isn’t it he best feeling when it’s over? :)

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Tracy     at 9:32 am

Great Running Tips! Love your Blog, it is very inspirational! Keep up the great work! ~ Take Care and stay cool!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks, Tracy!

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Therese     at 9:59 am

Wow! Kudos to you for getting out there and running in such weather! And curse the arse who stole your stuff. I don’t understand why people do that either, earn your own money and buy your own damned stuff. Arg!!!

But you did awesome getting out there and 12 miles is no small feat for 100* weather!

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Bryn     at 10:30 am

Gosh, you’re SO hard on yourself! The more I read this blog, the more I see that you complain all the time. Like Therese said above, running 12 miles in 100* weather is NO SMALL FEAT!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Wow, I don’t think I complain all the time at all. In fact, I am a very positive person (hence the reason I never thought my things would be taken). I don’t think running 12 miles is a small feat either, which is why at the end I said given the conditions I was proud of myself. The 15 mile run didn’t happen, and I acknowledged that I was bummed to have to cut my mileage short – that’s all. I’m glad I ran the 12 despite the heat. I’m sorry you feel I complain too much.

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Callie Reply:

This person is crazy. You are a VERY positive person!!! You do NOT complain too much. You had a rough day out there. It happens. You’re being REAL. And I for one appreciate that! Running isn’t always butterflies and roses. Tough runs like these make the finish line that much sweeter on race day! :)

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Jubilee Reply:

I like your blog, but I kind of agree with Bryn. You obviously really feel entitled to a golden, sun-shiney kind of life, and when you have experiences that normal people just deal with, you freak. So your sunglasses got stolen, so what? You guys own four or more computers. Go buy some more sunglasses. One of the things that makes me NOT want to really read your blog on a regular basis is how much you seem to be unable to deal with real life. Your what, 29? Be a grown up.

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Katie @ Life... Discombobulated Reply:

WOW! I agree with Callie. I think one of my favorite things about your blog (and my other favorite blogs) is that you are honest! Even super positive, upbeat people have crappy days and you should be able to share that when you want to. Keep your head up (and go treat yourself to a great new pair of sunglasses! lol). Your blog is awesome! : )

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Mastering Public Health Reply:

I agree with Callie and Katie. Anyone would be upset upon discovering that their belongings had been stolen, especially under such physically draining circumstances!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks guys! Good days and bad days, I guess we all choose to deal with things differently.

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Julie @ Willow Bird Baking Reply:

Dear Bryn and Jubilee,

Y’all are absurd. That is all.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

:)

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Sharon Reply:

Wow – people can be so mean sometimes. I think your blog is amazing and real. You are so open and honest with your readers and I truly appreciate knowing that you have ups and downs just like I do. I can totally relate to you and that is what makes your blog so special. If I wanted to to read fairy tales I would pull out my old copy of Grimm’s Fairytales! Keep doing what you’re doing, Emily! Your blog is awesome :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks Sharon! I try to just be myself, for better or for worse. I figure the right readers will stay with me, and those looking for something different are free to explore the many other blogs that are out there. But I’m glad you like mine!! :)

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Heather     at 10:40 am

Emily – I just recently started reading your blog and am really enjoying it! I love this one about pushing yourself. I’m with you 100% – it’s supposed to hurt!! I always try to think of Jillian when I’m running – I’m not going to die. Thanks for the encouragement to keep running in this heat!!

Also – I’m looking forward to making your “2 grain chewy energy bars” as soon as I go buy some millet! :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I LOVE Jillian, and also try to hear her voice screaming at me in my head when I run. :)

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Mandy     at 12:03 pm

12 m does not sound bad to me!!!
I always shove my water bottle into a low bush on the trail. I am not very trusting. :)

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Melissa @ HerGreenLife     at 12:22 pm

Sorry about you missing sunglasses and water bottle. I tend toward the over-trusting side as well. There are definitely times that I leave things on my bicycle that I shouldn’t, but I don’t want to lug them with me when I’m running in somewhere to do a quick errand. Wish we had a world where we could do that without the fear of things disappearing!

It’s a bit easier to keep water with me on the bike, but I’m always on the lookout for water fountains so I can refill instead of carrying multiple bottles!

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Alyssa @ Bride To Be Fit     at 12:38 pm

Just think about the fact that you still ran twelve miles in horrible heat! Good for you!! :)

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Stephanie     at 12:53 pm

What a lame-o. Hopefully, it was someone who thought the items had been left. I agree with leaving a note and your email…maybe they’ll be returned.

And if not? They’ll probably trip on a rock, scrape a knee*, and break the sunglasses. Then maybe they’ll learn that crime doesn’t pay.

*note, I’m not hoping for a major injury. Just something really annoying that’ll make the trip back to their car less than stellar. Injuries requiring anything more than some hydrogen peroxide and a band-aid SUCK!

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Kristina @goodnweird     at 2:49 pm

great post Emily. I had a similar 10 mile run. And I definitely can attest to the fact that if you want to run harder it is going to hurt. I do a tempo run and a speed workout every week for my marathon training and yes, they hurt. physically and mentally they are much different than longer runs. but your body and mind gets stronger with each workout.

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Jory     at 3:37 pm

For my long runs (or even shorter ones in really hot/humid weather), I use Hammer’s Endurolytes. I actually did a post about them not long ago on my blog. They’re all-natural and I am pretty sure they’re vegan too. They work. Really well. I’ve turned a bunch of other runners on to them also. :)

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Jessica     at 4:37 pm

Great tips!!!! So sorry about your sunglasses :(

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Kaitlin With Honey     at 5:53 pm

It’s so frustrating to have something stolen from you! I wish we could all be more trusting of other people. I’m sorry your sunglasses were stolen!

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Ashley Solomon @ Nourishing the Soul     at 9:36 pm

I very much agree with your tips for getting faster. Running with my husband Justin always forces me to push myself harder. This morning we did a track workout and he did my last repeat with me when I thought I wouldn’t be able to make it through. Not only did I make it, but I cut my time by a lot! It’s amazing what some support can do! Also, I agree you should “make it hurt”… I’ve just begun to understand this lately in terms of the actual physiology (i.e. increasing VO2 max). I always avoiding it “hurting” in the past, but now I’m starting to enjoy the pain!

And in terms of the heat, if I don’t get up by 5:30 am (MAYBE 6) I don’t do it. Props to you!

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Emilyeatsclean     at 9:53 pm

I’ve had water bottles stolen while I’ve been out on a long run and it is sooo frustrating. And while that does make me really mad, the stolen sunglasses would really piss me off! Congrats on making it 12 miles!! :)

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Matt     at 10:44 pm

same thing happened to me on a 15 mile run. someone stole my water and gummy bears, even though i had scribbled on a post-it: “for a run in progress.” oddly enough, the thief returned the stolen goods a few hours later to the bench where i had left them, albeit with the gummy bears mostly gone and the bottle empty. people are weird…

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Carla     at 10:57 am

Hi Emily! I just wanted to thank you for this post. I think that you may have changed the way that I exercise forever. I read the post on Sunday and I have worked out three times since then. During each workout, I was thinking about what you said about feeling uncomfortable…and I pushed myself a little harder than usual each time. While running, it did help me improve my time…and I felt sore after strength training (which hasn’t happened in awhile). Just wanted to say thanks…your advice may just be life changing:)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

That is AWESOME! :) It feels horrible at the time, but soooo good and worth it when it’s over. I love when I am sore from strength training – it lets me know that I am pushing myself to a new level, and really working my muscles! :) Congrats to YOU on working so hard!

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Lauren     at 8:18 pm

I’m sorry- fail?? Let’s have some perspective girl- you ran 12 miles. Wait- you ran 12 miles in 100 degree heat!! Who are you? I can’t do either of those things! I can’t even go for a WALK in 100 degree heat. You are insane! Don’t be so hard on yourself! :) You did AWESOME!!!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Totally proud of the mileage – only fail was the lost goods. Thanks for your support!

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TS75     at 1:37 am

I was searching for running in hot weather conditions and found your very informative blog! Good Job on taking time to write and share your experiences and tips! I have a question, how many seconds slower one should run in a weather like 98 deg with 70% humidity and feels like 106 deg for a speed workout. So let’s say if I have mile repeats in let’s say 7:30 mins/mile pace and have to do 4-5 sets, do I need to run 30 secs slower or may be 1 mins slower? Any help would be appreciated!

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bicycle lockers toronto     at 8:13 pm

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