about me

    Emily Malone

    culinary arts grad. nutrition facts lover. vegetarian chef. marathon runner. country music maniac. failed dog trainer. barre fanatic. loving mama.

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    EmilyBMalone@gmail.com

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    5K - 23:28

    10K - 52:35

    15K - 1:38:14

    1/2 Marathon - 1:57:39

    Marathon - 3:50:58

    A Look Back.



A 17 Mile Reality Check.

Whenever people ask me what I am doing on Sundays, my answer is usually the same.  “Well I’m doing a long run, and I don’t really know what will happen to me after that, so for now that’s the only thing I have planned.”  Sounds insane, right?  Trust me, it is.

While others spent yesterday cheering on their favorite football teams and enjoying one of the (hopefully) last few weekends of summer weather, I spent my Sunday doing this…

17 mile snip

Seventeen miles.  Looking at it on a map makes me really wonder how our bodies can carry us that far.  It also makes me wonder if they are supposed to… 

I am the incredibly lucky wife of a very talented distance runner, who offers to run crazy amounts of miles with me just for fun.  Casey isn’t training for any particular races or goals right now, but even so – seventeen miles?  Sign me up!

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He came up with a really fun route for our run, and I was pretty excited going into it.  All of my long runs have been very slow and painful, and I’ve attributed that to a number of things – too hot outside, improper fueling, too much walking the day before – you name it.  Sunday’s run was supposed to be my redemption run – the run that would prove that I still have my old running fitness, and that I can push myself beyond the levels of comfort.

We rode the Metro up to the L’Enfant Plaza station, essentially planning to Metro into the city and then run the whole way back.  I have found that the best long run strategy for me is to force myself to do the entire distance, and to not even present an opportunity to cut the mileage.  Essentially, if you put yourself 17 miles away from home, you have no choice but to cover the miles to get back to the comfort of showers and a giant lunch. 

After last week’s disastrous long run with no fuel, I was determined to do things right for this week’s important run.  We brought some cash to fuel mid-way, and we stopped in a CVS to pick up Gatorade (which they didn’t have, so we subbed with Vitamin Water) and some gummy worms.  The first half of the run was awesome – great weather, and scenery that people travel from all over the world to see.  We ran up past the Capitol to Lincoln Park, over to the White House and around the front gates, down to the Lincoln Memorial, and along the water over to Jefferson.  The mileage alarm on my Garmin kept ringing away as the miles ticked by. 

With our run almost halfway finished, we crossed the bridge back to Virginia and headed down the Mt. Vernon trail towards home.

And that was the point where I fell apart.

Right around the point where my watch chimed for 10 miles, I lost all will to run and push myself.  My legs were SO tired, and I had nothing left to give.  More than that, I was overwhelmed by how mad I was with how slow I was running. 

I will be perfectly honest with you guys – I have not trained for this marathon the way I should have.  I can blame the summer heat, the stress of moving, and a million other things.  But what it really comes down to is accepting responsibility for what I’ve done, or more importantly, what I haven’t done.  I have skipped a lot of mid-week runs.  I’ve allowed myself to walk more often than I should.  And I have taken for granted the fact that I’ve done this many times before.

I’m seeing it as a sort of Curse of the Multiple Marathoner.  In two years I have run 5 marathons, and in six weeks I will run my 6th.  I am not scared of them anymore, and there are no surprises left for me.  I’ve run in sweltering heat, freezing cold, and pouring rain.  I have run painfully slow, and I have set new records by running really fast.  But none of those things should have led me to believe that I could half-ass my training and still end up smiling at the finish line.  Running multiple marathons has prepared me mentally and emotionally, but proper training is essential for performing physically.

There is no reason in the world that I should have believed that I could run a good, strong 17 miles yesterday morning.  And I didn’t deserve to, because I haven’t put in the work to get myself there.  So instead, I ran a good, enjoyable ten (which makes sense) and a miserable half-walking seven while choking back tears.  Casey was supportive as always, but we spent most of the second half of our run heading home in silence, because we both knew the truth, and there was no need to voice it.

Let’s clear one more thing up before I continue.  I will not be setting a PR in six weeks, and I will not be qualifying for Boston.  I probably could have, but I made too many excuses about weather and circumstances.  But I am not quitting, because that’s just not my style.  Instead I am readjusting my goals to reflect what I am realistically prepared to run.  At this point, I’d just like to finish around 4:30.

After a grueling 17 miles, and right around 3 hours of running, we made it to our block and I could see my front door.  That was also the point where I started to feel incredibly sick and light headed.  I slowly made my way up the steps, and immediately laid down and put my legs up.

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Running marathons might be slightly crazy, but it CAN be done safely and it can even be enjoyable.  I have run two marathons where I have crossed the finish line beaming with pride – literally on top of the world.  And I have run three that have left me miserably sick and with my body revolting for days.  It turns out that the body is a wonderful communicator, if only I would listen.

After my run, I felt terrible but thought that perhaps a shower would help.  I ended up sitting in the bottom of the shower with hot water pelting my back, unable to stand up because I felt so physically ill.  Eventually I crawled out, and promptly threw up all of the gummy worms and Vitamin Water I had inhaled during my run.

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If that’s not a cue that I need to listen to my body, I don’t know what is.  The point of this post is not to be negative or dramatic, it is to be realistic, and sometimes facing reality isn’t always sunshine and butterflies.  I will still be lining up at the starting line of the Marine Corps Marathon in six weeks, but I will be doing it with a different set of goals, and a re-learned appreciation for just how intense this whole marathoning game can be.

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Whenever I am feeling disheartened or hopeless, I always challenge myself to find a silver lining.  What was intended to be my “redemption run” turned into a “reality check run” instead.  I learned that perhaps I don’t know everything about running 26.2 after all, and it’s exciting to know that even with multiple marathons under my belt, there are always new opportunities for a runner to learn and grow.

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When I’m not busy torturing myself with long runs, I’m also a pretty good cook!  Voting for the Next Food Blog Star opens today, and if you feel so inclined, I’d love your VOTE.  If not, no hard feelings.  I will still continue to cook with a smile.  :)

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157 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Erin @ Shortcut to Bliss     at 12:18 pm

I think sometimes as readers we tend to view particular bloggers as invicible. Of course, Emily can move and entertain friends and run a million miles all at the same time… I don’t want you to think I am celebrating your frustration, but the reality that you are human like everyone else. What an honest and refreshing perspective. I applaud your “personal responsibility” attitude!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thank you! :)

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Jocelyn @ EnthusiasticRunner     at 12:20 pm

You definitely have my vote!! My favorite blog to read by far. I think I make one of your recipes every week. Is that weird?

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Haha not weird, but it sounds like I need to get some more recipes posted asap! :)

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Kelly     at 12:23 pm

I can completely relate. I spent a good portion of my 20-miler in tears and physically ill. It was horrible. However, my 22, just two weeks later, was fantastic. Chin up, you’ve got this!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks Kelly! Hoping for a miracle… :)

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Sara     at 12:32 pm

Hope you’re feeling better. Great post.

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Alayna of Thyme Bombe     at 12:32 pm

Wow. Not that I like to see you “fail,”(going 17 miles at any pace is not a failure!)but it is a great lesson for beginning runners like myself that training is important work. I’m responsible for how well I progress at running- gotta stop blaming the searing Georgia heat and get out there!

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Carly (Swim, Run, Om)     at 12:35 pm

I have to say, this is a great post. It’s refreshing because of your attitude – you’re not concealing raw disappointment, but the adjusting of your goals just goes to show that we can ALL accomplish what we set out to accomplish, although sometimes life has other things in store for us. Good luck in a few weeks!

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Jordan Wandfluh     at 12:40 pm

I am training for my first Marathon (Chicago) and my training is not going the way it should as well. I have only reached 14 miles and I certainly took walking breaks. I am hoping I can feed off of the crowd and the city since I have never been there before to make it through those last miles. Honestly the heat this summer is what ruined training. For some reason this summer was just not tolerable to run in. I hope these next couple of weeks are strong for you and I. Just try to enjoy the training rather than beating yourself up over it! You deserve the best!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Just listen to your body! Chicago has an AMAZING crowd and a great course – I ran my 2nd marathon there!

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Katie     at 12:53 pm

Great post. I had a similar experience running 18 on Sunday. I felt slow and by mile 13, I was struggling not to burst into tears.

Marathon training is certainly the most difficult thing I have ever done, so as you train for your 6th, I can’t imagine how you feel!

Keep up the good work and can’t wait to read the recap!

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Chase @ The Chase Project     at 12:56 pm

I love real-life stories. Everyone has good and bad runs, everyone has good and bad races, everyone has good and bad days. It’s a reality check for you, but at the same time, as readers, it’s a safe haven for us because we realize that we’re not alone in the struggles we face. So, thanks =)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

One of my favorite comments ever. Thank YOU. :)

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Chase @ The Chase Project Reply:

:D

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Sara     at 1:00 pm

Even though you might consider that day a failure please know I think you are amazing to even have accomplished the run/day and your past marathons! I’m training for my longest race to date – a 10K – and honestly that’s far enough for me ;) and even though I mapped out a training schedule I, too, got sloppy with it. I skipped my shorter/easier runs because I didn’t think I needed them. I skipped the tempo and speed runs and only focused on the distance not realizing how important those other runs are to accomplishing my goals. The race is next week and I’ve finally gotten my butt back in gear but is it too late? Who knows. But as easy as it is to beat ourselves up because we know our potential and what we’ve accomplished in the past (so why can’t we do it now and with more ease??) we need to still remember no matter how long you’ve been training for an event or a sport it’s never going to be super easy. It is, however, still amazing to know how far you have come and how great you are at your sport now! :) Just take it one run at a time and give yourself a pat on the back. You deserve it and I know you’ll do great at your marathon!!! :)

Sara

P.S. I’m a Baltimore Blogger and have just fallen upon your blog the day before you moved after reading a post from Healthy Tipping Point. Great blog! Very inspiring! :) and makes me wish I still lived in Greenbelt to hit up DC more :P

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Good luck on your 10k – that is awesome! I took your comment to heart, so thank you. :)

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Sarah     at 1:00 pm

I know you’re trying to take responsibility, but don’t underestimate the power the heat can have on you. My husband read an article about warm weather vs. cold weather runners and there actually have been studies that have shown some people’s bodies’ handle the heat better than others. I wish I knew where he read the article. Anyway, I’m training for my first half and when I started a few weeks ago, it was a disaster. As the weather has slowly cooled off (I live in Atlanta) things have gotten better. Hopefully as you get closer to the marathons, the weather will help you get over that last hump. Good luck!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I know the heat has been a factor. I just wish I had dealt with it better. I could have run on the treadmill or gotten up early, and I didn’t. Hopefully things cool down and improve here soon. Good luck at your half!

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Runeatrepeat     at 1:02 pm

The only way I’ll run my long distances is if I HAVE to. I had Ben pick me up 19 miles away from our place this weekend and I knew if I didn’t get there I would miss my ride (I was on a trail and wouldn’t have been able to cut it short).

Sorry training has sucked. I was there for my last race and it broke my spirit. Stay positive. You are an amazing runner and I look up to you :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Exactly – I mapped it so I was exactly 17 miles from home, with no options for short cuts!

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Estela @ Weekly Bite     at 1:04 pm

Long runs can be tough. Even though my marathon days are over… I remember those long run where I was choking back tears.

I know you’ll do great at the Marine Corp Marathon :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

It’s nice to know I’m not the only one who has cried mid-run. Thank you :)

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Heather     at 1:06 pm

yikes so sorry you had a bad run! Those are the most miserable feelings b/c not only are you unhappy bu in physical pain as well! I am sure you will still do great in your race!

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Michele     at 1:12 pm

love your blog and I submitted my vote for you. good luck!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thank you!

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Kelli     at 1:18 pm

Emily,

Awhile back you wrote about enjoying your run. I can’t remember the exact, but here is what I took from it – When you’re having a “bad” run, stop and look and appreciate where you are and what you are doing. I can’t tell you how many times I have used your advice this summer, extreme heat and many runs where I just didn’t have it. I literally would look around and tell myself to chill out and just appreciate the fact that I am doing something good for myself, that I have two healthy legs that allow me to run, that I am able to take the time for myself and get outside and do something for me. I am running my first marathon in 3 weeks, that advice has helped me get to this point. I’m not a fast runner, but I am going to run 26.2 miles and I’m going to have fun (or try) while doing it.

So quit beating yourself up, get over it and back to the training you need to get done. Six weeks is plenty of time to get there and enjoy what you’re doing!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Hey Kelli! I actually DID think at one point when I was walking, “At least I get to be out here on this gorgeous day, and on a gorgeous trail.” And while we were up running around the monuments, I kept thinking how great it is to live here. You’re right, maybe I should have just tried to drive that point home a little stronger. Even so, I still get frustrated sometimes. Time to move on and push forward! :)

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Tamicka     at 1:20 pm

I think that everyone at some point thinks that they are invincible or that they’ve sone something x amount of times that they will be able to do it the next time without having to think about it. Yet in reality some things (like long distance running) you need to plan for. And now you know your not super woman, but you did learn something and i believe that that is the most important thing you can do. Learn with each new obstacle or challenge that you put in front of you. It’s not the same thing for everyone (for me it’s about finding balance in my life between food and exercise), but you should always be ready to learn something new about yourself and the world from time to time. I’m proud at the fact that I learn something new every once in awhile and you should be too :-D
PS Of course I’m gonna vote for you because your pictures and recipes showed me it’s not jsut green salads and bland tofu that are my only options to eat when I decided to become a vegetarian. Your blog ROCKS!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks! :)

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Tanya @ Life with the Kummerow     at 1:23 pm

Emily, thank you for your honesty and authenticity in this post. I appreciate that you let us know the ups and downs of marathon training rather than hide your lows from your audience. Although you have not been giving your marathon training your all this season, you have accomplished quite a bit- like moving- and you always stay true to yourself. Thank you for your words and insight into marathon training. I will be rooting for you on the other side of the blogosphere, and perhaps even in person (my bestfriend is running the same marathon and we may drive up to cheer her on), so if you see a crazy person screaming your name that you don’t know…it might just be me! Good luck!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thank you! Hope I see you there! :)

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Laine @ Beets, Butter and Mountaintops     at 1:40 pm

As a long time reader of your blog, I have noticed (which I think you have too) recently a pattern of your not eating enough around your runs or rides and then being really frustrated when you don’t perform well. I don’t mean this a criticism or something that you don’t already know, but your body can’t perform without enough fuel. Have you thought about visiting a nutritionist for a good look at what and how much you are eating and what you are asking of your body? It must be incredibly frustrating to not be at the level you want to be.

I mean this post in the most gentle way possible. And I’m off to vote!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Hi Laine! Thanks for voting. :) Fueling has always been an issue for me mid-run, but pre-run I definitely eat plenty. And as far as yesterday goes, I think I might have even over-fueled! I had gummies and sports drink the entire time, and made sure to eat and drink every mile or so. I have no idea what went wrong.

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Tracey @ TropicalHappiness     at 1:44 pm

I love the honesty of this post. So many people act like 18 or 20 miles isn’t too bad, with the occasional “runners block” where you want to be done. I think it’s so important to remember to listen to your body!

Hope you are feeling back to your normal self!

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Holly     at 1:44 pm

Thank you for this post, Emily! I am (hopefully) just recovering from what I am calling a “3 week slacker period” in my marathon training. It really helps to hear that even more seasoned marathon runners experience these bumps in the road. Like you I am trying not to dwell on what happened and just go forward with the best possible mindset for the remainder of training and the race.

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katie @runthislife     at 1:56 pm

I think that training is so hard. I am in the process of training for my second half marathon (and hoping to then start training for my first full), and I have taken for granted that it will be so much easier than the first. Heat, busy schedule, tired body…it’s been easy for me to make excuses to drop a run or two during the week. You have given me a push to get back on track and keep looking forward…and I am looking forward to keeping up with your training in the next 6 weeks as well! Keep up the inspiring work :)!!

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Sally Mae     at 2:00 pm

Running should be fun! And you should enjoy running in your new city. Sometimes too much training takes the enjoyment out of something you once loved. AND, don’t forget to eat. Women need fat, and a lot of bodies (AND MINDS) don’t do well on lower fat diets. I’ve been adding a bit of ghee to my oatmeal and rice dishes and I do feel a huge difference! If you are logging that many miles you shouldn’t feel deprived at all. It’s all good in moderation….including running.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Trust me, I eat a LOT! And I actually make an effort to eat a lot of fat because of that reason – tons of avocado and olives every day. I also ate a good amount during the run, so I’mnot sure what left me quite so unstable at the end.

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Evan Thomas     at 2:08 pm

Reality bites but you dealt with it well here! You aren’t injured; you didn’t push yourself unneccesarily far. You can get back on the horse and keep on going and be marathon ready in time. It might not be a PR, but from my standpoint just completing a marathon is more than impressive.

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Sharon     at 2:12 pm

This post was so timely. I am running my first marathon this October and headed out yesterday for my first 20 miler ever. I was terrified, more than a little apprehensive and excited all at once. Well, my run turned out to be not so magical after all. I just wasn’t feeling it from the very first steps which is never a good sign. By mile 16.44 I thought I was going to die – I was grunting and groaning and tears were welling up in my eyes. I managed to finish the 20 miles, but I was left feeling defeated and questioning how on earth I was ever going to be able to complete 26.2 miles in just three short weeks.

So thank you for this. It is so nice to hear a training run recap that isn’t all sunshine and butterflies. I was beginning to wonder if I was the only one out there who has less than stellar runs every now and then. Keep your chin up, Emily. You are such an awesome runner and have so much to be proud of. You are my running role model and I know you will surprise yourself at the MCM. I will be rooting for you for sure!

And btw, I just voted for you :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Good for you for finishing! And no you are DEFINITELY not alone – I have bad runs all the time. :) Thanks for the vote!

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Jayna @ Healthy Living Bites     at 2:15 pm

Thank you so much for this post! While my struggles at pressing on during this back injury are not quite the same as the struggles of a long run the feelings are so very similar. I have been trying for the past three months to find the silver lining to all this medical drama, and the second I THINK I’ve found it it slips away. This post made me tear up knowing the defeat you must have been feeling, and has re-energized me to keep on the look out for the silver lining that must be there!

Oh yeah, and OF COURSE I voted for you!

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Freya (Brit Chick Runs)     at 2:15 pm

I’m sorry you had a bad run – that sucks. I know that feeling too, and it’s so horrible :(
It sounds like you’re aiming to do the MCM in the same kinda time as me..do you want a running partner!? I’m going to be all alone :S!! If you do, please do email me :)
I hope you’re feeling a bit better anyway!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

YES!! If we are really running at the same pace, I am totally down for running together. Would make the miles go by sooo much faster. :)

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Freya (Brit Chick Runs) Reply:

Awh yay, that would be awesome! Well I’m aiming around 4hr30 too, so we can’t be too far apart speed wise :D Plus it’d be amazing to run with someone so experienced!! Are you staying in a hotel before it, or going straight from your house?

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Straight from our house – we’re only a few Metro stops from the starting line!

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Nic     at 2:19 pm

Good for you for listening to your body. Adjust your goals and don’t give up! Next week you could have a wonderful run! Marathon training totally toys with your emotions. One moment you’re on top of the world and the next moment your would could be ending. It sounds like you have a level head and will make it through just fine!

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kATH     at 2:22 pm

I think you just miss your running partner :)

17 miles is no easy feat – you are superwoman for getting home alive.

[PS I voted for you!]

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Emilee     at 2:24 pm

Sorry you had such a tough run. I still think it’s pretty awesome to do even ten miles. I started running this year and the farthest I’ve gone is 4. Must have been a great day cause this morning, the 2 I ran were tough. I guess there are ups and downs. Hang in there!

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Emilee     at 2:24 pm

Sorry you had such a tough run. I think it’s pretty awesome to do even ten miles. I started running this year and the farthest I’ve gone is 4. Must have been a great day cause this morning, the 2 I ran were tough. I guess there are ups and downs. Hang in there!

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Ashley     at 2:37 pm

My vote is in. I love you and your blog. I could really feel you through this post. You put it all out there, and I love that. Don’t be too hard on yourself. I think the marathon was just planned at an inconvenient time. If you would have continued running as much as scheduled, while moving, you probably would have ended up sick or injured. Moving is SO much work and SO stressful. That is not an excuse, it’s reality! Also, training for a marathon in Charlotte, during the summer, is no easy task. I’m not sure how you got through as many miles as you did. I’m glad you’re able to keep a positive attitude about it and set an attainable goal, even though training has not gone as planned. Sometimes wake up calls are so needed. However, I don’t think you slacked. I think life happened, and sometimes, there is just nothing you can do about that! :) xo

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Very good point. Even if I HAD trained well, something else would have suffered. That move nearly killed me!

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Ginna     at 2:58 pm

Bless your heart Emily! Don’t get too down on yourself! I voted for you this morning!

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Natalie @ simply fit. simply clean.     at 3:00 pm

What a wonderful, insightful post. It’s refreshing to learn about both sides of training for the marathon. Also, a precious reminder to stay in touch with our bodies.

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Julie @SavvyEats     at 3:02 pm

As one of the first food blogs I ever read, you definitely have my vote!

Good luck with the rest of your training + the race itself. Don’t be too hard on yourself, because you’ve had a very busy and stressful summer. You may feel like you’ve been making excuses, but can you imagine getting injured or sick because you pushed yourself so hard during your move? You loaded most of the truck by yourself–no way should you have run 15+ miles at the end of that day or the next day!

Thank you for your honesty in pointing out that not all workouts are easy. xoxo, Julie

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Haha AMEN to loading that truck by myself. Nearly killed me! :)

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Meg     at 3:03 pm

You’re still a rockstar!

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Jenna     at 3:26 pm

Hey Emily,

I have a random question … but I think that you will be just the person to help me! I am slowly trying to transition to vegetarianism (right now, I am not buying meat products, but I am still allowing myself to order them if I eat out) and I’m also trying to eat less processed foods. One problem that I am running into is the use of chicken broth. I already didn’t like using it because it is usually so salty, and now I think I should switch to vegetable broth anyway. Do you buy vegetable broth or make your own? And if you make your own, how do you make it?

Thanks!
Jenna

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

My culinary instructors would be sad to see this, but I very rarely make my own. I SHOULD, but I don’t. :( I usually buy mine at Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods when they are on sale, and I stock up!

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Becky     at 3:28 pm

I’ll throw out the million dollar question: Do you think you’ll run any more marathons after the Marine Corp? It just seems like you’re kind of falling out of love with running the SUPER long distances. I certainly can’t blame you – I’m nearly positive that I’d die running more than one. (MILE. Not marathon. For that would be certain death, indeed.) :)

We’ll all still love you no matter what. You don’t have to run marathons to be awesome! :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

YES, I do. :) Despite how I felt on Sunday, I really do love running, and I love the challenge of trying new speeds and distances. But I also think I’ve been training non-stop for two years, and I may give myself a well-deserved break. After October, I will wait and run the Flying Pig in May 2011. That should give me about 2 months off, and hopefully a renewed sense of confidence and motivation.

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Marina     at 3:31 pm

Emily, what would you say in a situation like this to your best friend? You’d say, “good on you for trying, don’t be so hard on yourself for not being perfect, you still rock for managing to run 10 easy miles” etc. etc.

Now say all of this to yourself :) Because you truly ARE your own best friend and if you don’t support yourself, who will?

Next time WILL be better. I have all the faith in the world in you.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks Marina! :)

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lauren     at 3:35 pm

A great reality check for us all. Because we can’t all have superb runs and life gets in the way.

You’ll rock your marathon. Keep the power of positive thinking!

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Carin     at 3:54 pm

I loved this line that you wrote: “…the body is a wonderful communicator, if only I would listen.” My New Year’s resolution this past year was a very simple one: “Respect your body.” Because you’re right — our bodies do indeed communicate in numerous ways. We just have to be willing to listen (and then do the right thing!). You’re still putting in incredible mileage, which is amazing. And you can always say at the end of a run — no matter how slow the time — “I did it.”

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Allie     at 4:01 pm

i love how you are so honest. from a complete stranger who doesn’t know you perspective, i think you have accomplished a ton this summer- between finsihing school, your job, and moving, you have had a ton of emotional and physical stressors, and the fact that you have even approached marathon training is really impressive. don’t be so hard on yourself, you are pretty amazing as is!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks Allie!

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kelli     at 4:08 pm

This proves you are human! No one is perfect, not every run is perfect for even seasoned runners like you! ( I however have always hated running wish I could get into it :() You have been so on the go lately maybe your body just needs one day to relax and refuel. You can accomplish whatever you set your mind to!

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Carrie     at 4:33 pm

Emily, Thanks for being so honest and telling it like it is. I think all of us have had horrible runs that made us feel like we’ll never meet our goals. Your attitude is refreshing and it helps to know that others struggle, too. I always try to remember that the bad runs make me appreciate the good ones so much more. Best of luck with the rest of your training and know that your readers will be there in spirit on race day cheering you on!

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Amber K     at 4:46 pm

I think it is great that you got a reality check run. And I love that you have the strength and confidence to tell us all about it.

I agree with the other comment I saw that sometimes we can view bloggers as these invincible people with all of the tricks and tools that we just need to be lucky enough to stumble upon ourselves.

Hey, we’re all just people! And good luck with the food buzz thing! The voting is going to get intense!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Trust me, I am JUST like you guys. :)

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Stacy     at 4:52 pm

Thank you for sharing and being honest. Honesty is refreshing and awesome! Your normal, yay! Try to see this bump in the road as a challenge, and it’s pretty great that you see this as a learning opportunity and not as a failure. That’s the impression I got anyway. No one is perfect, and that’s what makes you great! Keep at it girl!

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coco     at 5:30 pm

Enlightening post! I think what makes running/racing really interesting and challenging is the fact that not every run/race would be the same, not every run/race can be predicted. Each one of them must be meditated, worked and valued. No one can run a marathon without training, even you’ve run tons, just like no one can success without hard work. I love running precisely because of these reasons…. they’re in line with my life philosophy :)

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Danielle     at 5:33 pm

I love your attitude and approach to the race. Life gets in the way of our goals sometimes, and a lot of people have thrown in the towel at the point you are at now. Congrats on plugging through, despite the tears. While you may not cross the finish line in the time you originally aspired to, this may in fact be one of your most memorable marathons!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Love that point! So true.

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Robyn @ Wannabe Writer Runner     at 5:36 pm

Oh boy, sounds like a tough run. I threw up after my first half and it was horrible. But maybe you’re getting the kinks out now and learning what you need to keep your body well during the marathon.

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Cynthia (It All Changes)     at 6:16 pm

How sweet that he will up and run with you. Makes runs so much more fun. :-)

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Laura     at 6:17 pm

Everyone has bad runs sometimes. Every time I have one (like once a month), I find it Really hard to see the bright side of it. I know it’s there, but people are really hard on themselves. You have a lot going on in your life besides running! Great Job getting it done.

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Tammy     at 6:27 pm

this post gave me goosebumps… you are just so real. I’ve been training for my first ever half marathon and have taken the training slow and steady, doing a 15 week prep just b/c the most I had done before this was 2 mi…now I’m up to 10— you are so inspiring and said the words I say to my mother, sister and friends who tell me I am going to hurt my knees, hurt my back, its too hot outside..etc… I tell them “I listen to my body”–she always wins…. Thanks for being you!!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thank you! I try to be as real as possible, and show all sides of my life – the good and the bad.

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mtlion2009     at 6:27 pm

Emily,
You go girl. I find your blog an inspiration because you are so down to earth about yourself, your goals, your approach to life. And I think you are a bit too hard on yourself. You just moved your family! You dealt with some serious unknowns… where to live?… moving the entire homehold safely? And you DID it and everyone is happy yes! Keep the realism. It’s refreshing as are your recipes.
JP

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Very true – just wish I had found a better balance. Thanks! :)

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Sarah K. @ The Pajama Chef     at 6:47 pm

i’m so sorry your run wasn’t what you wished it would have been. BUT you finished and that’s a great accomplishment & something to be proud about. thanks for your honesty and your reminder about perseverance. you can do it! just rock out these next 6 wks and do your best. :) things will look up i’m sure!

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Sarah K. @ The Pajama Chef Reply:

p.s. i voted for you!!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

THANK you! :)

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Chelsea @ Strawberry Sweat     at 7:14 pm

As a runner who has also been neglecting her mid-week runs, I know how you feel. I am training for only my second half-marathon, and it’s hard not to get the mentality like “I’ve done this before.” My original goal was to come in under 2 hours, and now I know that my goal will not be achieved for this half-marathon. So, my goal will just be to enjoy it. Enjoy your marathon, because life is too short to beat yourself up on things like PRs and distances. Just enjoy running.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

That’s the plan!

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Ida     at 7:23 pm

Sorry you had a bad run. As you said, you can’t skimp when training for a marathon. You’ve had a busy summer and I think it’s good that you put life before running. You have a lifetime to set PRs. Just enjoy MCM, and be proud that you can move for 26.2 miles!
(Voted!)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks for the vote! Agreed on the “you have a lifetime” point. Really, there is no rush.

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Stacey     at 7:32 pm

Thank you so much for posting this. As readers, sometimes we feel like every run we read about is “perfect weather” or “made me feel stronger than ever”. I think it’s important to pay attention to the runs that AREN’T like that. I, too, have been guilty of not preparing for a race or run the way I should’ve. And then the excuses come…everyone makes them. I admire the fact that you are taking responsibility and owning up to the fact that you just haven’t been training very well. 17 miles is still amazing, even if there was a bit of walking! You are strong Emily! You are going to do great no matter what :D

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Pure2raw twins     at 7:38 pm

oh gosh, I do not know how you do it? I used to love running, did 2 marathons, but that is it for me. You are amazing!!

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Jen     at 7:43 pm

Emily dear you are way too hard on yourself! You have put in hard work- I know because I was there on some runs- and you do deserve to run well. This summer has been unbearably hot- I’ve only been happy with 3 of my long runs and only one took place down south. And moving on top of that? This is not your fault. You’re an awesome athlete and will race well again! Perhaps we need to find a spring marathon so we can train through winter? :)

And I am so sorry about the stomach issues. They can make any run suck. I know your pain :(

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Pretty sure I made you walk three miles in Chicago. :) Come doing the Flying Pig with me in 2011 – you will LOVE it. It can be your “easy” fun run after Boston!

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Laurab @ foodsnobstl     at 7:57 pm

Dont worry, we have ALL had those days and horrible runs. Try to enjoy and learn from the experience.

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Liz     at 8:00 pm

Excellent post. I’m proud of you for being so honest with your readers about something that is both frustrating and embarrassing. I also really needed this post right now. I’ve experienced similar issues as you this training season – skipping mid-week runs, slow runs, lack of motivation, illness – you name it. I take responsibility for those errors, and I know at this point I just have to suck it up and hope for the best. Thank you for a great post.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Embarrassing is RIGHT – a tough pill to swallow, but I felt it was necessary. You’re welcome. :)

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Lindsey @ Eat, Read, Run     at 8:18 pm

Oh boy have I been there. Good for you for working through it and realizing that you haven’t been as true to your training as in the past. I’m so afraid that I’ll end up slacking in my next one or the one after. It’s tough to maintain such intensity. But you are so smart in being realistic about your goals. I hope your next long run goes much better for you.

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Lauren     at 8:24 pm

Girl, I love this post! It’s truly just what I needed to hear. I’ve been training for my 2nd 1/2 marathon but I feel so much worse this time around than last. Maybe for some of the same reasons you mentioned, but I was feeling so apprehensive about it coming up in just 3 weeks.
I’ve been hearing so much supportive words and advice from others and I love that everyone is being so true and honest about how difficult training can be sometimes. It makes me feel more at ease knowing I’m not alone but also gives me more confidence at the same time.

You’ll be awesome Emily! I know you will! :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

We are BOTH definitely NOT alone – we just need to be as willing to share our failures as our successes. Good luck at your race!

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Devon     at 8:32 pm

You have accomplished a great deal running 5 marathons (soon 6) in 2 years. That is an incredible amount and with it comes a reasonable understanding of your own fitness. I think that long runs probably seem less daunting (sometimes downright easy). But that doesn’t mean we don’t have bad days, I have had incredible train blocks for races and then run really crap long runs out of nowhere. Sometimes it is just a collision of factors that aren’t easily explained. Usually it is followed up by a stellar run or race because we proceed more cautiously/conservatively (pace, fueling, etc).

Sometimes, after a bad run, I think, “thank goodness I got the bad one out of the way so it won’t happen on race day”. Just cut yourself some slack, rest and recover well and you’ll do great!

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Tina     at 8:47 pm

I love the honesty of this post and how you are willing to readjust your goals. You don’t put yourself down and think you failed…even if you know you could have done differently. That’s setting a great example!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Doing my best! :)

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Courtney B.     at 8:59 pm

I have been waiting for this post since I saw your Twitter feed on Sunday. I suppose that sounds weird, but I knew that you were going to lay it all out, exactly how it happened, pretty or no and I would learn something from what you said.

I’m training again and I am SOOOO SLOOOOOOW. And sometimes it’s hard not to beat myself up about it because I know if I had kept running I would be faster than last year instead of slower. But reading honest accounts others’ training, whether good or bad always helps.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

How interesting that you know me so well. :) I waited to write about it until Monday because I knew I was too angry to appropriately reflect on it that day. I’m slow too – it happens. At least we’re still running!

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kvh     at 9:13 pm

You poor thing! I’m so sorry your run went so poorly. :o( I hope you are feeling better now. You are still a rockstar… you will have 6 marathons under your belt! Not many people can say that, no matter how fast or slow you are! Again, you are so inspirational!

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chelsey @ clean eating chelsey     at 9:15 pm

Ugh I’m so sorry your run did not go as planned. It’s so good you’ve accepted what will most likely happen for you in the marathon due to the circumstances of your summer. Hope you’re feeling better!

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Lorinda     at 9:28 pm

Sorry to hear about your run but glad you’re keeping it in perspective. As a newbie runner I figured out pretty quickly that there are good runs and there are bad runs, even when you do everything the ‘right way’ (but usually when you haven’t!).

I’m just so impressed you’re doing your sixth marathon! And even on a ‘bad’ run you’re still WAY faster than I am. Keep up the fantastic work!

My vote’s already in!

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Lisa (bakebikeblog)     at 9:39 pm

What an honest post – thankyou for sharing your thoughts with us :)

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Adrianne@ Flex-appeal     at 9:53 pm

Your blog makes me smile!

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Rachel     at 10:03 pm

I know I’ll come back to this post again in the future-thanks Emily! I did an 18 mile race yesterday, as a marathon tune-up, and the whole time I just kept thinking, “why would anyone run 18 miles, ever?” Even though I’d already done multiple 18s and a 20, sometimes they just feel extra hard. But there were thousands of people out in central park running the same 18, so there must be something to it ;-)
Are you still running the columbus half? I’ll be doing the full then, so starting to count down. 18 all of a sudden seems short when I think that 26 requires an additional 8 miles!
Anyway, fabulous, REAL post. Much appreciated.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I’ve had that feeling too, looking around like “everyone else is doing this, so why can’t I?” Some days we really are just off. And YES, I’m still running in Columbus!! I will cheer you on for the second half. :)

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Kathleen     at 10:11 pm

I needed to read this today. I often aim for perfection with workouts and forget that you can learn something important from the not so great ones. Good luck with the remainder of your training runs, you’ve got this Emily!

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christina cadden     at 10:49 pm

You are doing awesome and not quitting but looking differently at your run makes a difference. You will do great!

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Catherine     at 11:00 pm

I really admire that you share your struggles as well as your successes, and I think you’ve got a great attitude! Best of luck at the Marine Corps marathon, I know you’ll do great, even if it isn’t what your original goal was. :)

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Erinn     at 11:04 pm

I hope that you will have an enjoyable experience! It must have been tough to admit this to yourself. We think you’re awesome anyway! I’m running 10 miles for the first time this weekend and am a wee bit nervous…

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

You can DO it! Don’t let the nerves get to you like I did – just believe you can do it and you will.

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Z     at 11:11 pm

Voted for you!! Good luck!! Love you blog :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Yay – thank you!

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ilana     at 11:17 pm

Emily, I hope you are feeling better. You have great perseverance, and I really hope the next run is better. Be kind and gentle to yourself. You are a champion! (And anytime you feel like an easy run day with a much slower runninng partner, let me know.;)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

For sure!

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ilana Reply:

PS: You have my vote, too. :)

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Katie @ Life... Discombobulated     at 11:58 pm

I love the fact that you are so honest and open about all of this! Plus, allowing yourself to recognize and accept responsibility for not training as much or as hard as you felt you should have might turn things around for the last 6 weeks! Good luck – you can totally kick training in the butt for the next 6 weeks and still have a darn good run on marathon day!!!

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Jess @ NZ Girl Runs     at 1:40 am

Thank you for posting this. I have been running for 4 weeks (I’m a newbie!) and yesterday was awful. I was tired and dragging and I couldn’t push myself to finish and had to walk back to my car. I declared that running was too hard and I quit. Not anymore! Bad days happen to everyone! There are a few more things I need to try before I declare myself a running failure and quit. Thank you for posting this very honest blog. Its kinda nice to know that I’m not the only one who struggles with running. <—-meant in a good, nice way!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Just like you said, bad days happen to EVERYONE. Keep your head up as you start your running journey. You are most definitely NOT alone!

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Laura@keepingslimandgettingstylish     at 5:59 am

I’ve been reading your blog for a little while now but this is the first time I have commented. Thank you for being so honest, this was a wonderful post, you’ve shared your feelings with us and that shows immense strength of character. I’m so sorry to hear of what a tough time you’ve had but the fact that you’ve been honest with yourself and still came out with positivity and the aim of still completing your marathon is great :-)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks for the comment, and for breaking your silence. :)

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Marika     at 6:46 am

Like many other readers, I thank you for your honesty and “keeping it real”. You are awesome and hopefully the next run will be much better!

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Wanda     at 7:53 am

Great blog! You only get one body, take care of it!!!!

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alexe @ soyaetchocolat.com     at 8:22 am

I’m so sorry for your run! I experienced the same thing in one of my 17 km runs last summer (I was training for a half marathon). I had to stop to walk so often that I eventually just stop all together to cry my heart out. I was angry at myself for not pushing enough. I eventually jog 5 km back to my house. I couldn’t picture finishing the 17 km. I was able to run the distance the next week though so my confidence was back up for the race! As you say, I think we really have to listen to our bodies. Yes, it’s feasible, but it doesn’t mean that we have to suffer to do it. To me, running should be about having fun while doing something active. It’s good to push myself but, sometimes, I need to step back and just be proud of what I have already achieved.

On that note, I’m off to vote for you! :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thank you! All these comments are making me want to go try again RIGHT NOW!

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TheHealthyApron     at 9:29 am

Since i’m not a runner, it is hard for me to relate to this post. I would be exstatic if I ran 10 solid miles. That is an amazing accomplishment! I have never understood the runner’s mentality. I tampered with it in my early 20s but I never ran more than 8 miles at a time. I never considered marathon training because I had too many friends telling me horror stories of bloody stools, bruised toes, no life,and complete exhaustion.
Your question: were our bodies even made to do this? Is valid. How much are we supposed to push ourselves?? Should we really get upset with not completing 17 miles? HECK NO! Like I said, to any non-runner, 10 miles is amazing. ANd you still finished 17 miles total! That in itself is HUGE! Your body seems to be talking t oya though and I hope after this post you will seriously listen and not be so hard on yourself! :) Keep your chin up!!

[Reply]

Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I realize it sounds insane. Running is all really individual and relative. Since I started as a total newbie, I feel like I can still totally relate to the people who are training for a 5k – I can remember when that was me. For the most part, I have really enjoyed running marathons, but as with any sport or distance, there are highs and lows.

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afarmerinthedell.wordpress.com     at 9:38 am

Emily,

You are a breath of fresh air. Thank you for this post. As a long distance runner myself I can totally relate to this post. Thanks for your honesty.
You will definitely have my vote!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thank you!!

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Gwen     at 9:45 am

Such a great, thoughtful post, Emily.

Yesterday I NO JOKE set up a 52 week training plan to get myself back into running shape so I can do MCM in 2011 again. I know that I won’t hit everyone of those runs either, but I know that if I want to run another marathon and improve on my 6:10 time, then I have to work at it.

The MCM is one of my favorite events ever – and I will be out there cheering even though not many people I know are running this year. I’ll cheer for you! And know that you will accomplish your goals because you’re realistic about them.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

That is awesome – good for you!! I will look for you when I’m running – make sure to yell if you see me. I will need it. :)

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Erin D.     at 10:46 am

Hi Emily! I just wanted to thank you for this post! Long run days are always “soft” plan days–I can’t ever make a commitment because I don’t know how I’ll feel afterward. I most definitely have very good days and very, very bad days where running is concerned. Sometimes I’ll have an awesome 10 or 12-miler (I’m only up to half marathons as of yet) and be ready for more and some days I’ll be doing exactly what you did–sitting down in the shower, hoping I can make it to the toilet quick enough to throw-up, and waiting for waves of nausea and cramps to knock it off. Anyway, it’s just nice to know I’m not alone since I’ve seriously always thought I was just weird.

I thought of your post this morning, again, because I had a terrible hot yoga practice. Dizzy, nauseous, had to lay in savasana for almost the entire 90 minutes. Disappointing (and more than a bit embarrassing) but hey, you get over it!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Nice to know I’m not the only one who sits in the shower sometimes. :)

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Lee     at 11:58 am

I think that as long distance runners, we often expect the runs to be easy and fun and don’t realize that running, in your case, 17 miles puts an extreme amount of stress on the body. I’m hoping that you have your redemption run soon! But if not, just remember that sometimes life does sort of get in the way. Don’t be too hard on yourself. If you didn’t train as well as you felt that you could for this race, there’s always the next one, right?

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

For sure. Giving myself a nice long break after October, and setting my sights on Flying Pig 2011.

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Sarah (Going on Goals)     at 12:39 pm

Thank you for such an honest post. One day I would like to run a marathon, posts like this help me realize what a commitment marathon running can mean!

I am no where near Marathon running, my longest race is 10 miles in October. I recently increased milage too quickly and have been feeling it for weeks. Thankfully, I live with a PT student who I beg to stretch me out daily. Yoga has also been helping!

ps: I voted for you!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks for the vote! Anyone can run a marathon, but it DOES take the proper training. And a ten mile race is still a LOT of miles!

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Grace @ Front Porch Yoga     at 12:47 pm

I’m super proud of you for writing down all these important lessons…now you can refer back to this post whenever you need a reality check (and hopefully won’t have to go through the physical pain/sickness again anytime soon). And, you are so right that listening to our bodies is important- it’s one of the big reasons that I love yoga so much (because I’m more tuned into what my body needs). You are truly an inspiration!

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Lauren     at 3:47 pm

You hit the nail right on the head when you said, ‘should we run 17 miles’…due to the response from your body I would say no. I know you think you are not pushing yourself, but you are. You should not do the marathon at all. You should take a BREAK. We do not have to get to a place of love and accomplishment through torturing ourselves. What would happen if you didn’t do the marathon? Nothing. You would probably feel guilty, but you know what, you are stronger than those feelings. It upsets me deeply watching you put yourself through this- and I don’t even know you. Please, please, please, you said it yourself- listen to your body. You think you’re listening, but from an outsider looking in, I’m afraid you’re not. Be good to yourself.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Hi Lauren! Thanks for your comment. :) You are right that nothing would happen if I didn’t run the marathon, but I definitely feel like I am fine to run it – just need to run a lot slower. I don’t know if you are a runner or not, but I assure you that stomach problems (including vomiting) ARE actually normal after super long runs. Not to say that we should experience that too often, as clearly it’s not ideal, but it doesn’t happen very much. The sense of accomplishment and confidence I get through running is definitely worth a few painful runs. I really appreciate your concern – I promise to listen a little better on the next run.

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Michelle @ Chasing Ambulances     at 9:27 pm

I think I know exactly what you’re saying about how you’re not afraid of the marathon distance anymore. That’s how I feel about the half (my fifth is 2 weeks away). And it’s also probably the reason I’ve slacked majorly with training this go around! I have definitely reflected on the fact that I need to take the half distance seriously – it’s awesome that you can take training for a marathon leisurely, but you and me both just have to be careful to not take it so lightly that it kicks us in the ass ;)

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tina     at 9:26 am

hey emily! i’ve been reading your blog for a few weeks and LOVE it!!! first time commenting ;)

i LOVE all of your mason jars- did you order those online? i’ve been having such a hard time finding them near me, been striking out everywhere (home depot, cost plus, whole foods only sells the mini size, etc). where do you get yours in so many sizes???

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I actually got mine at a local hardware store in Charlotte! But they are very reasonably priced on Amazon. Since a few other people asked, check the original post again – I added links to the jars! :)

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Ashley M. [at] (never home)maker     at 10:52 am

I say the same exact thing every Sunday. I’m like: Well, I have to run for like 3 hours in the morning. I’ll see how I feel for things later in the day. People think I’m a nut. And w00t for crazy distance running husbands! You’re so lucky yours will run with you!!!

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Amanda     at 12:02 pm

(((hugs))) I am running MCM as my first marathon. I am slow and hoping to finish around 5 hours. If you are interested – you can run with me (the whole way, a portion, 2 miles whatever!) and help me get through my first ;)

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Kerr     at 1:49 pm

As someone who was really excited to complete 3 miles earlier this week, you AMAZE me! Just remember that even if you dont do well, you are still leaps and bounds ahead of most of the population.
Off to vote for you now!

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Gina     at 5:01 pm

My marathoning experiences have been somewhat similar to yours. Two years ago, I ran the Marine Corps Marathon as my 6th marathon. It was the last marathon I have run. My training for that marathon was not even close to what it should have been, and I finished in 5 hrs and 15 minutes…nearly 1 hour slower than my normal marathon finish time. I thought I could just run a marathon on little training because I knew what to expect from a marathon. Wrong. I cried during that marathon, and I even sat on a curb for 10 minutes crying my eyes out and contemplating just giving up. (It was right before running over the neverending bridge around mile 20ish when I had my breakdown.) Thankfully, a marine walked up to me, put his hand on my shoulder, and asked if I was okay. I told him I hadn’t trained enough and that I didn’t want to go on. He said, “Ma’am, today you are a Marine. A Marine never quits.” I got my sorry butt off that curb, hugged him with tears still streaming down my face, and started walking. I was getting to that finish line even if it meant walking the last few miles.

I learned a lot about myself that day. I hope to run another marathon someday, but for now, I am completely enjoying the half marathon experience! It is much less of a time committment in terms of training, so it fits better in my life.

Good luck at the marathon!

[Reply]

Amanda Reply:

This brought tears to my eyes! What motivation. Thanks for the headsup on the neverending bridge at mile 20ish, ha :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Wow, this made me cry. Thanks so much for sharing! Your experience actually sounds very similar to my Chicago Marathon experience. I sat on the curb for a while too, and just hung my head and cried. Very cool about the Marine, and I guarantee you I will remember this when I am running.

(Also good to know about that bridge – aaahhh!)

[Reply]

Monica     at 5:48 pm

So sorry you had a hard Sunday run! You have had a lot going on and maybe your body is just feeling really tired from such a busy summer.

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Sarah @ w30     at 2:36 pm

I don’t know if you check comments this far back, but I stumbled upon your blog about a month ago and have been making me way through the archives. Anyway, I am a newbie runner and had to face my own reality check a few weeks ago. Like you, I had to face reality – without giving up (that was even the name of my post). It’s nice to know that the need to sometimes adjust expectations isn’t limited to a beginner like myself. I’ve really been enjoying your blog, and can’t wait to catch up on all the posts. Also – congrats on your baby! :)

[Reply]

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