about me

    Emily Malone

    culinary arts grad. nutrition facts lover. vegetarian chef. marathon runner. country music maniac. failed dog trainer. barre fanatic. loving mama.

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    EmilyBMalone@gmail.com

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    A Look Back.



A Good Egg.

There is something unusual lurking in my kitchen this week.  Something that hasn’t been there for months and months.

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Casey and I have been toying with the idea of reintroducing eggs into our diet for a while now.  I have never made a strict switch to being vegan – instead it has just been sort of a natural transition that I eat that way 95% of the time. 

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Eating meat is something I feel pretty strongly about (not gonna do it), but dairy has always been kind of a squiggly grey area.  I have no intention of opening up a debate about why we should or shouldn’t be vegan (or vegetarian), since I believe that everyone has the right to choose what they eat. 

My personal opinion is that animals like cows and chickens are supposed to produce milk and eggs – that is the job that nature has given them.  But as has happened with so many things, factory farms and big business have exploited these poor animals, and transformed them from peaceful workers to tortured machines.

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I went through a long learning phase, reading books and articles, and trying to understand our food industry as best as possible.  During that phase I avoided all dairy and eggs, just to be safe.  But ultimately I decided that if I felt I could find a good source for eggs and dairy, I would consider bringing them back into our kitchen

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In talking to the local farmer at our market, and learning all about his chickens and their environment, I felt good knowing that my eggs came from happy birds that are simply doing their jobs.

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Back in earlier days, cheese and eggs were something to be celebrated.  A rare treat that brought families together to the table.  And so in my kitchen, I will treat them as something special, because they are.  Something someone worked hard to create, and to be savored in small portions and for special meals.

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And if this wasn’t a special meal to celebrate finding a wonderful local egg farm, then I don’t know what is…

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Two fried eggs on top of sliced wheat bread, smeared with creamy caramelized onion hummus and resting on a bed of spinach.

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Sprinkled with a little sea salt and some freshly ground pepper – makes all the difference in the world.

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Just when I thought this sandwich couldn’t get any better, I put the other slice of bread on top and watched the dippy yolk run out the sides…

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Pure eggalicious heaven.

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I’m still not going
to eat eggs out in restaurants or outside of my house, since I want to be sure I feel comfortable with the source.  Maybe someday our food industry will be regulated and accountable enough to provide food that makes me feel safe and good about what I’m eating.  For now, I’ll settle for simply having a carton or two in my kitchen.

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104 Comments so far
Leave a comment

tina     at 1:04 pm

i started eating eggs a few weeks ago after randomly craving them during a long run (and not eating them in 2 years). i was suprised (and excited) that it didn’t have any effect on my stomach and have been eating them every couple weeks- such a great protein source! :)

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Tina @ Faith Fitness Fun     at 1:06 pm

That’s how I feel about it all as well. I try to eat the best, most humane products. I know I personally could not give up meat totally, so I limit it and we buy the best quality. We actually have gone in with another family to buy half a cow from a local farmer with humane, organic, grass fed only cows.

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Laine @ Beets, Butter and Mountaintops Reply:

I do the same thing for my beef, pork and chicken. I just have a big chest freezer so when I buy large quantities I have somewhere to put them.

I love knowing the farmers who grow food, and seeing where the animals live before they die.

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alana fiks     at 1:08 pm

eggs are one of the perfect foods in my opinion, and i follow your sentiment eggsactly!

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Becca     at 1:08 pm

That’s a great attitude. I had fried eggs for breakfast this morning as well! One of the things that I love about my local supermarket is that the farmers they deal with are approved by Compassion in World Farming and the RSPCA.

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Carin     at 1:08 pm

OK — you’ve motivated me to find a good source for my eggs on a consistent basis, rather than turn a blind eye. Thanks for writing about this.

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Kelly     at 1:10 pm

Looks so good! I love fried egg sandwiches!

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Laine @ Beets, Butter and Mountaintops     at 1:10 pm

Oh, I love local eggs. I will go without them if the few sources I have are out, as they often are in the winter as the days get shorter. The good farmers let the hens rest and don’t put lights in the houses to make them lay more.

My sister raises chickens now, she lives a few hours away but she brings us eggs when she visits. Those are a treat and I know they are from happy chickens!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

My sister raises chickens too! I think that’s part of the reason I feel okay about eating these eggs. I have seen well-raised happy chickens on her farm, and I know that such an environment exists.

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Dorry     at 1:10 pm

I have similar feelings about eggs. I stopped eating them several months ago (without making a conscious decision to do so) but my husband eats them so eggs will most likely always have a place in my refrigerator. I agree with your philosophy about knowing the source of the eggs and feeling comfortable buying from local farmers who care for the chickens. And this eggs sandwich looks great!

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Chrissy (The New Me)     at 1:12 pm

I recently reintroduced eggs into my diet for the exact same reasons, and I have the exact same caveats as you – I only eat them occasionally, in my home, when I am sure they came from a local, humane source. Three cheers for informed and compassionate choices!

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Sarah (Going on Goals)     at 1:15 pm

I love eggs! I think they are soo versatile and a great source of protein. I am glad you decided to reintroduce them once you felt comfortable with your knowledge and the source.

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suki @ [Super Duper Fantastic]     at 1:21 pm

As soon as my backyard is all set up, guess what? We’re raising our own chickens for eggs instead of getting ‘em at the farmers’ market. Sometimes I wish to be in a place where I can grow more of my own things, but since it’s not possible, I do my best to just balance it all out and consume responsibly.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

That is AWESOME!

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Christin@purplebirdblog     at 1:27 pm

You just can’t beat farm fresh eggs. The weak yellow yolks from store eggs just can’t compare to the beautifully bright, substantial yolks from farm fresh eggs. And where in the world did you get carmelized onion hummus!? Did you make it? Sounds crazy good!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I didn’t make it (it came from Whole Foods!) but I am definitely planning to make it sometimes soon, now that I’ve discovered it!

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Christin@purplebirdblog Reply:

Ooooo, I’m going to have to check my WF for that! Can you please tell me the brand? :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I will dig the container out of the trash when I get home and report back to you. :)

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Christin@purplebirdblog Reply:

Oh goodness, you don’t have to go to all that trouble! lolllll :D

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Eva     at 1:32 pm

i love eggs and completely agree. while i rarely eat cheese or drink milk, i do buy local eggs from co-op and relish each and every bite! such a good source of protein!

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Ashley     at 1:33 pm

Great light + color in the sandwich photos!! I feel the same about eggs and dairy. There are a few restaurants out here that serve local, organic eggs, which is so nice! Love the looks of that soft bread…might need to make an egg sammy for lunch. :)

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Anna     at 1:35 pm

I really hope to raise my own chickens someday… I loved working with the chickens on the farm this summer. They have such distinctive personalities!

In the course of work I learned something really interesting about chickens and organics. People concerned about sustainable and humane animal products are accustomed to looking for the organic label as an indicator of worth/quality, but you shouldn’t shy away from local or free-range eggs at the market if they’re not marked organic.

This is because organic chicken feed is too expensive and too often stolen out of the feeding troughs by wild critters to make it worth buying. Also, if a chicken is being raised on a farm that also grows produce, the bulk of their diet is fed fruit and veggie scraps from the field rather than processed feed anyways. Despite the fact that my farm was certified organic, our chickens weren’t certified because of this. However, they live very happy lives running around their wide open pen and eating whole, real food. Sooo moral of the story, talk to your farmer and ask them for the whole story! Which it sounds like you’re doing. So yay!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I worked on an organic farm this summer too! It’s also important to note that many farms grow their produce organically, but can’t afford the expensive certifications and licenses to become officially organic.

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Anna Reply:

Indeed. To be honest, I’m an organic supporter who doesn’t have a whole lot of faith in the USDA’s administration of the organic program. I did a huge research project on the National Organic Program for a class last year and it was it was kind of scary to discover how utterly negligent they’ve been in recent years- not actually enforcing the organic standards they set out.

Just goes to show, getting to know your farmer and their ways is really the best way to determine the quality of your food!

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Rebeca Lynda     at 1:35 pm

I live in Alexandria as well- I’d love to know which farmer you’re getting your eggs from. I’ve been getting eggs at Eastern Market (I work on the Hill) but I’ve never been able to talk to the source, I was just hoping for the best… Thanks :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

King Street Farmer’s Market – really nice farmer who brings his daughter every week. Can’t think of his name off the top of my head – I’ll get it this weekend!

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Kristin (Cook, Bake, Nibble)     at 1:40 pm

I love eggs, and I think you’re doing the best possible thing you can for making sure the eggs come from a reputable source. I try to buy local, organic, free range eggs myself- they’re a splurge, but worth it!

xo

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amy     at 1:40 pm

ditto @ rebeca, i’d love to learn of any new sources for farm fresh dairy where their animals are happy here in the NoVa area =)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

There is a guy who sells them year round at the King Street Farmer’s Market on Saturday mornings! He’s over on the right side, by the water.

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KaraHadley     at 1:41 pm

I like your reasoning, that producing milk and eggs are something the animals do already. I’d never thought of it that way. Eggs are definitely the thing I miss the most from my pre-vegan days. They really are incredible.
Maybe, just maybe, I’ll chat with the egg-guy at my farmer’s market this weekend. Because that sandwich looks good!

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chelsey @ clean eating chelsey     at 1:48 pm

Your views honestly match mine to a T – I haven’t had eggs in a long while because I need to find a good source to get them. We do have a farm down the street from us that sells eggs that I have been meaning to go to, but havn’et yet. That sandwich does seriously look good though.

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Cate     at 1:56 pm

I really want to get my own chickens someday so I can control what they eat and how they live. Unless I find a farmer I’m comfortable with, I think I’m going to avoid eggs for awhile. That sandwich looks AMAZING!

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Chicago Cuisine Critique     at 2:06 pm

Your sandwich looks amazing!

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Brittany (A Healthy Slice of Life)     at 2:15 pm

I like knowing where my eggs come from, too- I get sketched out about it sometimes!

PS- I know Goldilocks and the 3 bears, but I just knew they ATE porridge… the fairytale didn’t explain what it was ;)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Haha okay, fair enough. :) Mmmmm now you have me thinking about porridge again…

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Kendra     at 2:22 pm

I applaud your efforts to not just take some extremist, far-flung emotional response, but for actually going out there and researching, learning, and discovering, in order to make a truly heart-felt and educated decision!! While I am not vegan or even vegetarian, I tend to lean that way. I have an allergy to read meat, and digestive sensitivities to milk and eggs. But I love to each chicken, pork and fish.

Anyway, I was wondering… doesn’t things like bread have eggs and milk in them? Or do you buy special brands? Otherwise how do you justify using them? Not challenging you, just asking out of total curiosity, as I am not totally familiar with how the vegetarian world works.

Thanks for sharing!!!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Hey Kendra – great question! That’s kind of why I said I eat that way 95% of the time. Most commercial breads and things DO have eggs and milk in them, which I inevitably end up eating. But we do most of our baking and such at home, and that is always vegan. We do our best, and I think we do pretty well. :)

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Maria     at 2:25 pm

Love eggs! In fact, last night’s dinner was two eggs sunny side up and a piece of toast, simplicity at its best :)

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Charlie     at 2:25 pm

I love eggs but I only buy free run hens eggs.
And that sandwich looks a-m-a-z-i-n-g.

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Sana     at 2:27 pm

You should totally eat what you want! Egg salad sandwiches are amazing!

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Liz @ Blog is the New Black     at 2:28 pm

I couldn’t live without eggs. Your pics are gorgeous!

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Marci     at 2:48 pm

As I read more and more vegetarian and vegan blogs, I always find it interesting to read about logic and reasoning behind why people eat the way they do. Since starting my blog and reading more books and blogs, I think more and more about why I’m eating the way I do and have changed my habits.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

See Marci, that’s why I like you so much! :)

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Ashley M. [at] (never home)maker     at 2:50 pm

I have a love-hate relationship with eggs. When I made the transition from vegan to vegetarian, I waited the longest to eat eggs. Something about them freaks me out just a little. BUT, I’ve been pretty consistently liking them for a while now. Especially poached eggs atop toast. They’re just such a great source of protein . . . and I love all your yolk photos! <3

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Beth     at 2:53 pm

Continually laying eggs is not a chickens “job”. Their job is not to support a humans wants. They are naturally supposed to lay a clutch and hatch them into chicks, not continually lay egg after egg. Laying egg after egg takes a big toll on a chickens body. I am glad that you are getting eggs from a farmer who seems to treat his chickens well, but his idea of humane may in fact be far from yours.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I agree with you, continually laying eggs is NOT a chicken’s job. But peacefully laying eggs and having those collected, in my opinion, is acceptable, when the alternative is probably no life at all. Like I said, it was important for me to do my research, and I do feel comfortable with the eggs that we chose to purchase.

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Julie Reply:

The alternative is chickens living peacefully without anyone collecting their eggs to eat at all. Yes, it’s better to eat eggs from a local source than a factory farm, but you’re still justifying a decision to eat an animal product. You can’t even remotely call yourself a vegan if you do that. And, to those that can’t believe others would put forth their own, opposing opinions on Emily’s blog, readers have just as much a right to their opinions as Emily does to hers.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

And that is why I have never called myself a vegan. Definitely agree about opposing opinions being welcome – that is why I don’t delete them, and let the conversation flow.

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Becca Reply:

I love blogs where the commenters have different views. There’s nothing more off-putting than blogs where the comments are nothing but “OMG! I love you! Everything you say is so right!”

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I totally agree, Becca. And I always pause to consider that maybe I DID say something wrong, or without thinking it through, instead of just emotionally firing back. I try to learn from all my feedback – the good and the bad.

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Sandy     at 3:00 pm

“cows and chickens are supposed to produce milk and eggs – that is the job that nature has given them. ”

Right… So the eggs can turn into chicks and milk is for calves.

Humans can also produce milk, but it doesn’t mean that I want someone else besides my children to drink it.

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CathyK     at 3:10 pm

i really appreciate how you presented your egg feelings, emily. you explained your viewpoint, the reasoning behind your stance, and didn’t bash us over the head with your opinion. a well-written eggie-post! and great photos!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Thanks Cathy – that was the hope!

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Alyson     at 3:15 pm

I became vegan in 1998, 11 months after the birth of my 3rd child. We were still learning the ropes and figuring everything out when I became pregnant with #4, and I actually ate meat and cheese sometimes then because nothing else sounded good. Once my morning sickness passed though, I never looked back. I had a huge repertoire of recipes by the time I conceived #5, and that pregnancy was vegan without problems.

But by the time I got to pregnancy #6 in 2003 I started feeling kind of run down. Great diet, but I just couldn’t get enough protein. After 5 years as a vegan the only protein source I felt good about was eggs, so I added them in for the pregnancy. They made all the difference. I went vegan again after the pregnancy was over.

My final pregnancy with baby #7 was where the permanent change happened. I decided I was OK with eggs forever after, so now we’re ovo-vegetarians. I’m glad to have that source of protein for my growing children; many of them don’t like eggs by themselves, but they can still get a smidge inside foods I make. And some of them happily eat a scrambled egg, and I feel great about that. So know where you’re coming from.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Can I just say WOW – seven babies? I am impressed! Awesome to hear about your different diet strategies through pregnancy – that will be something I have to consider down the road.

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Alyson Reply:

:) Most of them have never had meat at all, and only limited dairy (like, what is in a friend’s birthday cake). The two eldest, though they used to eat a standard diet, don’t remember ever having eaten meat. And the neatest part is watching them grow. I know my hub’s mom, especially, was very convinced I could never grow healthy children on a vegan diet. They’re all healthy, strong, well-muscled…beautiful. The proof is definitely in the pudding.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

This totally made me smile. :)

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Jessi @ Quirky Cookery     at 3:19 pm

Those eggs look so awesomely delicious and cooked to perfection. It’s great that you found a local farmer that you’re comfortable with….I’ve yet to find one in my area that seems to care. :(

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Emma (Sweet Tooth Runner)     at 3:34 pm

I feel the same way! I eat vegan where possible, as I don’t believe in the way we treat our livestock terribly, and I don’t wish to support this. However, I do eat local organic eggs now and again, as I know where they are from and that the chickens are treated well :)
I have had ‘full’ vegans make quite derogatory comments about this though! We should all be free to eat as we choose, and not judge others who make different decisions.

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Felicia (a taste of health with balance)     at 3:57 pm

I lovee love love this post. I raise chickens myself, and we have about 30-40 in the back yard. I only eat our chicken eggs, and I have the same exact thought and opinions as you’ve stated above. We have some very happy hens and roosters, and they love eating leftover scraps of veggies and fruits (apple cores, banana peels, carrot skin etc). The egg yolks are such a beautiful deep golden yellow from all the grass and scraps they eat, and they have lots of space to wander and exercise their wings. Here’s the link to my original post about it:

http://atasteofhealthwithbalance.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/free-range-a-glimpse-of-the-farm/

I too have toyed with the idea of going vegan, but I do believe that something like eggs pack a lot of nutrition, and my favorite way of eating them is exactly how you had them in this post: runny eggs on toast with spinach! We have the same taste buds! So.GOOD.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

This is AWESOME – thank you so much for the link!

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Alina @ Duty Free Foodie     at 4:16 pm

The color of an egg can be a good indicator too, if you are buying just “organic” eggs – as I do, because my local farmer that I know doesn’t supply enough.

When chickens were raised in a natural lifestyle (which would be their happiest) and allowed to run outside under the sun, their eggs will be a very deep yellow, almost orange.

The pale yellow eggs that you get with conventional eggs are not natural!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

My eyes look nice and ORANGE! Definitely a good sign. :)

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Alayna @ Thyme Bombe     at 4:21 pm

I’m so glad you posted this today. I am about to take the plunge and really get serious about maintaining a vegetarian diet, at least for all of the meals I eat at home. Eggs are something I’m keeping on the list for now and I wasn’t sure how to feel about it. After reading your reasons for reintroducing them, I feel better about it, I just need to find a source I feel really good about too.

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Lindsay @ The Ketchup Diaries     at 4:23 pm

I hate to be harsh, but I’m sort of blown away by the people that have the audacity to challenge you (not in a thought-provoking way) after you are just stating your opinions. People need to relax and not be so judgemental. I eat meat and think we could still be fine friends, as evidenced by HLS. I’m so sick of reading healthy living blogs that judge one another! Why can’t we all just respect each other’s opinions and eating habits? To me, you’re not “heatlhy” if you run around yelling at others and making them feel bad.

Okay, sorry that this tangent has nothing to do with your post.

I completely admire your thoughts on dairy and eggs. I actually agree with you 100% even if it may sound contrary to my eating meat. I try to buy products where animals were raised well – whether it be through dairy or my ground beef. I’m just not as good at it as you, which makes me want to hide in a ball in a corner because I feel so guilty about it.

And really – how good are runny eggs?!?

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I definitely don’t judge others for what they eat, and in an ideal world no one would judge me either. That said, I’ve got some pretty thick vegetarian skin. :) And of COURSE I have plenty of meat eating friends! A bond of ketchup love is far stronger than a different meal on our plates.

Don’t hide in the corner! Just be proud of the decisions you make, and the messages you promote. :)

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Amy     at 4:28 pm

Not trying to be a jerk (really!), but I do have to point out that cows and chickens do not have a “job” to produce milk and eggs. Cows produce milk only when they’re pregnant- just like human women- and they do it to feed their babies. We artificially inseminate them so that we can take the milk; not much natural about that!

Anyway I’ve always liked your blog for the vegan-friendliness, and I hope that part stays! :)

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

That will most definitely stay! Like I said, eggs are special so we still plan to do vegan baking and probably 99% vegan recipes. I guess as far as the “job” goes, I didn’t mean it in a workhorse sense of the word, but more that it is something they do naturally. If it is done unnaturally, that is definitely not okay in my book.

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Amy Reply:

Hey, I’m glad to see people be 99% vegan. :) It’s just funny that I never thought about the cow/milk thing for most of my life. Everyone just thinks they go around making milk, all willy-nilly, when that’s far from the case. But it’s great that people are paying more attention to their food choices these days!

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Beth Reply:

Yea, if there’s anything that keeps me from consuming cow’s milk, it’s the thought of the moms and babies being separated after birth. So sad :-(

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Gabrielle Reply:

Amy, this was my reaction to this post as well, and I commented below without reading the other comments first. I think many of us grow up thinking cows just produce milk for us humans to drink, and that we’re supposed to drink it to be healthy, when in reality we’re the only species consuming milk past maturation, and it’s not even milk from our own species! It’s really just marketing that has led us to our assumptions, but education is key in enlightening people to the reality not just of the factory farming industry, but of realistic nutritional requirements, and the health hazards of overconusmption of animal products.

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Like I said above, I think my use of the word “job” was probably not the right choice. I just meant that it is a product of a natural process. Obviously if it is obtained unnaturally, I would never support that.

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Meg     at 4:52 pm

Caramelized onion hummus? Be still my heart. Where did you find such a thing?

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

My MIL bought it at Whole Foods! Not sure of the brand though, but it was totally delicious.

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Janine Reply:

Any chance you’d consider creating your own recipe for caramelized onion hummus and posting it on your site? My son is allergic to sesame (in tahini) and he cannot eat store bought hummus for the most part. I LOVE caramelized onion and this hummus sounds like a dream!

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

I’m actually planning to make my own version! But I usually use tahini. :( What do you typically use instead? I’m willing to give it a tahini-free whirl…

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Janine Reply:

This is what I usually do for a garlic, tahini-free hummus recipe:
1 can garbanzo beans, 1-2 garlic cloves (minced), salt, pepper, a little chili powder, and olive oil. In a food processor I add the beans, garlic, salt, pepper and chili powder to taste, adding olive oil until desired consistency.
What does the tahini do for the recipe? What is the importance of adding it (consistency, flavor)?

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Emily @ The Front Burner Blog Reply:

Good question – I don’t know! :) I’ll try something similar as soon as I get my onions going…

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Clare @ Fitting It All In     at 4:56 pm

Mouthwatering pictures.
Nothing like a good dippy egg, especially from a good source:)

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bitt     at 5:16 pm

I’ve never liked eggs, even when I ate meat way back when, so I’m not longing for them or substitutes as a vegan.

I don’t think people are trying to be judgmental of your choices, just present an alternate view of animals being meant to give food for humans. Some people disagree with that.

Certainly the chickens you get eggs from have that role and are treated better than a factory-farmed hen. But I still would ask the farmer: what happens to the male chicks he breeds? What happens to the hens who are done laying eggs? Often the males and “spent” hens go to slaughter, so the egg industry plays a part in the meat industry.

I applaud your honesty and inquisitiveness in this matter.

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Cary     at 5:58 pm

That was all well-said. I feel the same way about eggs. I serve my two small children “responsible eggs” as a part of their otherwise vegetarian diet because they are so nutritious.
That sandwich looks delicious!

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Gabriela @ Une Vie Saine     at 7:50 pm

I love your point of view on eggs and dairy. I’m 100% vegan at home and about 75% vegan when eating out, because I’d rather enjoy a meal with friends than worry about whether my vegetables were cooked in oil or butter. I completely understand what you’re saying- eating eggs and dairy from a certifiably humane source every once in awhile is completely different from having an omelet with mass-produced eggs every day. I’m glad you’re taking the path that works best for you!

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Rachel     at 9:08 pm

I used to think the free-range, organic, “whole foods halo glow” eggs were a-ok…then this report circulated a few months ago. interesting to check your egg source out:

http://www.cornucopia.org/organic-egg-scorecard/

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Monica     at 10:29 pm

Oh your egg sandwich prep and final product photos are beautiful. I don’t know what it is about eggs, but they just look so darn nice in photos. I know that is strange, but the contrast of the colors just makes for a nice photo.

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Amy     at 10:31 pm

I really admire you! I’d like to learn more about farming and the food industry but don’t really know where to start. Do you have any suggestions? (I’m not a vegetarian and doubt I would become one, but I do want to be much more mindful about my food sources.)

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Ashley K     at 10:54 pm

Hi Emily!

I have been reading your blog for about 9 months, but I’m not sure if I’ve ever commented before. :)

This post really spoke to me since I do the exactly same thing. I have been a vegetarian for 3 years, and experimented with veganism on and off throughout that time. Over the past year, my fiance and I have been purchasing eggs from a local farmer’s co-op. I feel great knowing that I am supporting local farmers and that the chickens are raised in their natural habitat. I do feel a bit guilty because even though these chicken’s lives are a complete 180 from those in factory farms, they are still slaughtered for meat when they cannot lay anymore. I feel best with a little bit of animal protein in my diet, and seeing as I’m allergic to dairy, this is the best I can do.

We are lucky that a local restaurant also purchases their eggs from this co-op and we have the option to go out for a delicious Sunday breakfast in good conscious.

Thanks for bringing light to this subject, I love your blog!

-Ashley, a reader from Okemos, Michigan

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Renee     at 11:15 pm

Emily…if you really want yummy goodness…try toasting the bread next time and use some vegetmite instead of the hummus. It makes a really good sandwich.

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Ida     at 2:07 am

I really want my own chickens some day. Local eggs from happy chickens are the best!

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maya @ finding balance in tokyo     at 3:52 am

I love eggs! They are one of my main sources of protein.

I’ve actually gone back and forth on how I feel about them in the past, but since moving to Tokyo I’ve become a hard-core egg lover. Even the supermarket eggs here are SO much fresher and tastier those back home, and the organic free-range/farm eggs I splurge on are just amazing.

To emphasize the point, there is almost NO talk of salmonella here when it comes to eggs, and the consumption of raw or half-cooked eggs is not only common and accepted, a much-loved and encouraged practice.

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Casey     at 6:06 am

What does this farm do with the male chicks?

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Gabrielle Reply:

Excellent point, Casey, but keep in mind that hens can be kept without roosters present and produce unfertilized eggs as long as they are alive. If the farmer starts with hens only, no males to discard. Small production would mean a small amount of eggs, sold at a high cost to only a few, unlike the factory farming industry which churns out massive volume for very low prices. This would be quality versus quantity.

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Kristy     at 8:35 am

This a really heart felt post about eggs?!? I love it ;-)

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Dynamics     at 11:47 am

I really want to raise two small chickens, but the chicken coop price cannot justify this. Can you imagine. Eating eggs fresh from the chicken would be heaven. I am sure they would love living with me and providing eggs for their upkeep. Someday I hope the price of chicken coops comes down so people can raise 2-3 chickens in their backyards.

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Kim     at 7:44 pm

It breaks my heart how some animals are treated in this world… :(
I buy free range eggs, would never ever pick up a carton of cage eggs. I really wish there were more people out there who care about more than just the price of eggs and meat, and make a stand to how animals are treated!!
Your sandwich looked amaaaazing! Might have to make it this weekend :)

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Gabrielle     at 10:10 pm

I’ve been conflicted about eating eggs since I went vegan two and half years ago, but what I’ve come to realize is it’s not really the hen’s job to provide eggs for humans, they lay eggs just as women ovulate, because it’s a part of procreative life. And cows produce milk to feed their young, just as other mammals do. So… taking the milk from the cow means her calf does not get that milk. And taking the egg from the hen means we’re taking her potential for young.

Of course it’s a personal choice, but I found it a little odd your wording that it’s their job, i.e. to produce this “product”, for our consumption. Really that’s not their job at all.

That said, your eggs look great. I spent most of my life eating them and I know how good they taste. Doesn’t mean I will ever eat another one, no matter the life of then hen who produced it, but that’s my choice. I respect yours.

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Maryann     at 11:02 am

I agree with your post it is a personal decision.
And everyone is entitled to choose the food choices they prefer. Thank God for freedom.
I eat eggs at times but not a lot but I had 2 yesterday on Ezekiel bread. Watching cholesterol is important to myself and my husband. We are fortunate we have a lot of farmers in our area to choose from.
Blessings,
Lancaster Co PA Gal

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Ashley     at 8:34 pm

This sandwich looks absolutely divine! You cooked the egg perfectly! Mine always comes out a little burnt. :(

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Kayla     at 5:08 pm

Hello!
I live on a farm up in Alberta, Canada. My husband and I raise chickens for our own enjoyment and for the eggs. We raise heritage breeds – the breeds that are struggling to exist in this world of factory farming.
I love keeping chickens. They are so easy to care for, and give us endless enjoyment. We often will allow a hen to sit on her eggs, and have developed quite a motley crew of chicks as a result.
But more often than not we eat our eggs. It is wonderful to know that our chickens are happy and healthy, never stressed, never overcrowded. Our number one priority is maintaining a healthy environment for them.
It is also wonderful to be able to provide eggs to my family and coworkers. So many of them were raised on farm fresh eggs, and are so pleased to be able to enjoy them again after many years of having to eat eggs from the grocery store.
I’m glad to see that you are enjoying eggs again. It really causes the hen no stress as long as the chickens themselves are well cared for.
Cheers!

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Krissy     at 5:37 pm

I enjoyed this blog post and really benefitted from the many comments that your blog readers posted. Keep up the thought-provoking topics! =)

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Rob R.     at 1:24 pm

There are many comments here where people write that everyone should be able to choose what they eat. By that reasoning I guess pedophiles should be allowed to have sex with whomever they want. You folks are forgetting a simple fact if you choose to eat milk dairy or eggs you are responsible for unnecessary suffering no matter what kind of fairy tales the farmer tells you. It is a nice fantasy but exploitation is exploitation it is never nice, kind of like kind slave owners. Somethings are just bad no matter how you rationalize them.

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Caitlin     at 3:22 pm

Just started reading your blog and I really enjoyed this post. I’m a pescatarian and feel the same way about eating eggs and dairy. I check the labels of the food I buy to find out more about the sources from which they came and stick with brands I feel I can depend on. The downside is that the products I trust tend to be more expensive, which is frustrating for a college student and many others. However, until the food industry as a whole becomes more responsible in farming practices, I guess I’ll have to pay more for quality products and the well-being of animals. It’s so important for people to know where their food is coming from and how it got to their plates. Thanks for sharing your personal insight on the matter.

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Emily Malone Reply:

Welcome Catlin! Sounds like we have very similar feelings on dairy and eggs. :)

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kim     at 1:37 pm

ooo! Looks yummy.

I hope those are Millingwood Organic eggs! We have some friends that live in the Seattle area and they sell certified organic eggs at the local seattle farmers market. They are the nicest people! They sell lots of organic stuff! Even if they aren’t their eggs, just a little shout out to them. They have the best greens/lettuce too. ;)

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Amateur Mommy     at 11:46 am

We are looking for a source for eggs locally. You’d think it’d be easy in a rural area, but unfortunately, no. I would eat them if I knew the chickens were treated right. In terms of dairy, I feel more opposed to it since I have breastfed my daughter. It kind of seems unnatural to drink/eat something that’s supposed to be for a newborn cow. It stinks that cheese is so tasty!

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