about me

    Emily Malone

    culinary arts grad. nutrition facts lover. vegetarian chef. marathon runner. country music maniac. failed dog trainer. barre fanatic. loving mama.

    Contact Emily

    EmilyBMalone@gmail.com

    Search

    What’s Cooking?

    Personal Bests

    5K - 23:28

    10K - 52:35

    15K - 1:38:14

    1/2 Marathon - 1:57:39

    Marathon - 3:50:58

    A Look Back.



Forks Over Knives.

I have been excited about seeing Forks Over Knives since I first learned of it and watched the trailer way back in the fall.  The movie opened here in Seattle last week, so the three of us ventured over to the University of Washington campus last night to finally see it for ourselves.

Capture

I have seen many of the mainstream movies about the American diet and the effect it is having on our world – Food, Inc., King Corn, No Impact Man, Super Size Me, etc.  Most of the movies I have watched in the past have focused on food politics and battling big industry.

While Forks Over Knives touched briefly on some of that, this film for the most part took a different approach, focusing on scientific and medical evidence as a means to promote a whole foods, plant-based diet.  Through a compilation of charts, research, personal stories, historical data, and more – Forks Over Knives is a (convincing) 90 minute look at how eating a plant-based diet can literally change the world as we know it.

I have always felt that dietary choices are just that – choices – individual to each person.  While I make no secret of the choices that I make, I try to also make sure to keep an open mind and not judge or antagonize others who choose differently. 

I have always hoped that my blog would provide an opportunity for me to lead by example – showing that healthy, vegetarian food can be delicious and full of flavor.  Rather than relying on scare tactics and propaganda, I’d rather talk about whole grains and how to cook food straight from the market

With all of that said, there were a few key parts of the movie that struck me to the point that I couldn’t help but share them with you.  First was the case of Joey Acoin, the self-proclaimed “meat and potatoes man” from Tampa, who’s diet and lifestyle had led him to life threatening blood pressure levels and type 2 diabetes. 

1-Joey Acoin

After months of daily pills and injections that did nothing to improve his quality of life or health, he sought help from the doctors featured in the movie.  Their treatment was to use food rather than medicine to reverse what appeared to be his likely path to an early death.  His attitude was refreshing, as he was honest and open admitting, “I know in reality many people eat to live, but I’m the kind of guy that lives to eat.”

Two months later, after no medical interventions other than a total diet overhaul, Acoin had lost nearly 30 pounds, and was completely off of all daily medications, including his insulin injections.  The former “meat and potatoes man” was now advocating a plant-based diet to his whole family, and said he’d had never felt better or more alive.

The second example was actually the son of one of the primary scientists involved in The China Study (the book from which the film was based).  Rip Esselstyn is a former professional triathlete turned firefighter who worked to defy the stereotype that “real men eat meat.”

4-Rip Esselstyn

After learning that one of his brothers in the firehouse had cholesterol levels over 350, he led his firefighting family to adopt a purely plant-based diet as a means to support their friend in need.  These burly firefighters from Texas talked about how in their world, barbecue is a sport, and men who eat vegetables aren’t respected. 

But Rip earned the respect of both his team and the audience, as he climbed the fire pole using only the strength of his arms, all along the way repeating “real men eat plants.”

I walked out of the theater feeling both inspired and frustrated.  The movie reminded me of all the reasons why I love my vegetarian diet, and why healthy food has become such a passion for me.  As a woman, I think it’s much easier for society to accept my vegetarian choices, and while as times I don’t necessarily feel supported, I rarely feel mocked.

I wish I could say the same for my husband.  Male stereotypes are unavoidable in modern marketing, and every time I turn on the TV I feel like I hear something to the tune of “real men drink Miller” or “this plate of baby back ribs is a man’s meal.”  When did we start proving ourselves through our plates, rather than our words or our actions? 

My husband is a vegetarian.  He’s also a seven-time marathoner, changes the oil in our car himself, and can cook as well (if not better) than I can.  It infuriates me that he is constantly made to feel like an outsider, and forced to defend choices that are both improving his health and our planet.

I left Forks Over Knives feeling as committed as ever to my plant-based lifestyle, and immediately headed home to prepare a delicious vegetarian meal.

IMG_9746 (640x427)

The movie came at a good time, as I am just finally over the pregnancy-sickness hurdle, and am enjoying creating food that makes me feel healthy and fabulous again.  Like I said before, I hope that regardless of your food choices, you never feel judged or questioned here.  Instead, I hope that both the committed vegetarians, and those who are just curious – can all find something to take away to both their kitchens, and to their lives.

Because if there is anything I have learned as a vegetarian, it is that through whole foods and healthy choices, you can most definitely eat to live, while still living to eat.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

115 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Brittany (A Healthy Slice of Life)     at 4:49 pm

I can’t wait to see this in Charlotte (coming June 17th!)

I am constantly working on incorporating more vegetables into Hubbs’ diet. He likes them just fine, but can’t get ‘full’ with out a meat protein or a lot of bread. Just the way he grew up, but at least he eats all his veggies, too!

[Reply]

babycakes     at 4:50 pm

LOVE every word of this post! I wish everybody would see this movie.

[Reply]

Chloe (South Beach Diet Girl)     at 4:53 pm

I will definitely have to check this out – I saw the review on Caitlin’s blog as well and am interested in seeing the movie. I’m slowly switching to a more vegetarian diet and also love learning about our food systems and how nutrition impacts our health.

Thanks for the review!

[Reply]

Kamaile     at 4:54 pm

Great review Emily! I feel your frustation! My husband and I are both vegan and he ALWAYS gets hell for not eating meat. I wish all people could eat what they want without being judged. Are you going to post a recipe for that salad? It looks so refreshing!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Salad was just lettuce, apples, and almonds with a nutritional yeast dressing – YUM!

[Reply]

R @ Learning As I Chop     at 4:55 pm

Sounds like an interesting movie. I was vegetarian for a year but then had to give it up due to, ironically, health reasons. I had no “gas in my tank.” Once I started eating meat, I felt MUCH better. I guess it shows that there’s not one “be all end all” diet in the world, but that people should eat food that works best for their bodies, while also trying to be conscious about the kind of food (ethical, organic) it is.

[Reply]

Shannon     at 4:58 pm

I can’t wait to see this movie. I also couldn’t agree more about the sterotyping that exists with being vegetarian for men. My husband and I are vegan, and people always make comments asking if I made him a vegan. Makes me SO mad. However, we’re working to make eating a plant-based diet appealing. I love movies like this that help the cause.

[Reply]

Cara Craves...     at 5:00 pm

I would love to see this movie!
I love the healthy eating approach to
medicine. Good, whole, real food can cure
a multitude of ailments; but most people
are more apt to rely on drugs instead…which
sucks!

[Reply]

Cynthia McGiverin     at 5:02 pm

Great blog. You raise some great points! I loved the movie!

[Reply]

Alysa (InspiredRD)     at 5:02 pm

Thanks for the review, I look forward to seeing the movie. You are definitely right, there is a stigma attached to male vegetarians. My husband often feels like he has to “sell” one of my meatless recipes to his friends to convince them that they aren’t wimpy.

[Reply]

Melissa @ HerGreenLife     at 5:04 pm

What we eat is a tough issue because it is so tied up in culture, childhood memories, etc. The idea of eating a new way makes many people uncomfortable, which turns into defensiveness and belittling the other ways of eating.

My husband was vegetarian before we met, and also long before I was a vegetarian (since he was 12 or 13years old). While he’s not a muscle man, his diet provides him with plenty of energy to bike to work every day and do some pretty hard physical labor in the garden.

To my knowledge, he’s never gotten too much flack about being a vegetarian, even here in the Midwest. We’re looking forward to raising a vegetarian family, as we’re welcoming our first child this summer — obviously his diet did NOT affect his manliness in that regard ;)

[Reply]

Freya     at 5:04 pm

This is such a well written, not attacking/judgemental post. I love it! That movie hasn’t even had trailors over here so it’s probably not being released, but it sounds awesome.
I love the point you make about being strereotyped through our plates. I’ve been STd when I’ve pulled out a salad or some veg when I’m at uni – ‘normal students don’t eat veg! They have beer and pizza!’ and my sister thinks that people who eat like me are weirdos, hippies, the usual. It’s kinda infuriating. But like you said, it must be so tough for a man to deal with. I’d never thought about it til you wrote it, but I can see it now!

[Reply]

Susan (Oliepants)     at 5:07 pm

Great post. I have yet to see this movie – partially b/c I think it just came to Dallas and in limited release in places I’m not sure of.

As for your husband – kudos to him. My husband prefers veggies (he’s not a vegeterian) over meat 90% of the time and he always gets weird looks by other men. It makes me irritated too.

I say this – when the ‘real’ men are enjoying their ‘real’ mean meals, have pot bellies, high cholesterol, and are taking pills at the age of 35 or 40 (I know people), then they can talk to your husband about what all those ‘real’ men meals really mean to them.

I’m all for eating exactly how you want to. But, to make someone feel bad or an outsider because of their decision is ridiculous.
:)

[Reply]

Teresa Kato     at 5:08 pm

I saw an advance screening of FOK in Portland, OR several months ago. Awesome film… it reinforced my dedication to the plant-based lifestyle that has put my polymyalgia rheumatica into remission. After seeing the movie (and meeting Rip Esselstyn in person at a conference) my sister and I were able to convince our parents to give Rip’s Engine 2 28 day challenge a try. My mom (whose own mother died of heart disease) reduced her total cholesterol from over 240 to under 170 and my dad brought his cholesterol into the heart attack proof under 150 range and reduced his pre-diabetic fasting blood sugar number to normal levels. All in 28 days! Even better… my sugar, fat, meat and processed food loving parents were so wowed by their progress and by a new found love for fresh, whole foods that they continue to follow a plant-strong diet that is low in sugar, fat and sodium. They are 82 and 75 years old and they look and feel amazing. I am so proud of them and so thankful for Forks Over Knives and the researchers, physicians, authors, patients and producers behind it!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

That is AWESOME!

[Reply]

Maryann     at 5:08 pm

This is great don’t know how I can see it in Lancaster PA. We became vegan last year encouraged by our self pay insurance. My husband has started eating a little fish and chicken on rare occasions. I have had some turkey but on very rare occasions. This is encouraging me to take in more veggies. I have had High blood pressure issues for a long time and diet and exercise have not lead me to go off my daily pill but I keep trying.
Thank you for all you share with your bloggers.
Lancaster CO PA Gal

[Reply]

Laura     at 5:09 pm

I really want to see that movie though I think I’ll have to wait until it comes out on DVD.

As a hispanic/latina woman, it’s really hard to be a vegetarian. Meat is such a part of the culture and meals that it is hard to explain why I don’t eat it. I went to a barbecue yesterday (I should have known better) and when I said I didn’t eat meat I got asked – “Does that include chicken?” I feel so ungrateful sometimes because these get togethers are usually so generous with food but I can only have salad (if available) or rice when I don’t ask what it was cooked with. I usually bring something but there’s so much food my vegetarian fare rarely gets touched.

I’m not saying there aren’t hispanic/latino vegetarians. I’m just saying it’s not widely recognized – I can’t imagine people would say about a vegetarian hispanic/latino man and that’s sad.

[Reply]

Melissa     at 5:10 pm

Hi! Can’t wait to see this movie. Great post. I completely agree with you. I feel like if I just skirt around the menu and order all veggie, no one says anything, but if I say don’t eat meat people get weird. I don’t prepare meat when I have guests, and haven’t ever had any complaints.

I was just wondering since your sister is staying all summer, is she a vegetarian also?

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

She isn’t a vegetarian, but she eats plenty of meatless meals!

[Reply]

Amy     at 5:10 pm

Hi Emily!

I can’t wait to see this film – glad to hear you gave it your seal of approval. :) Your blog is honestly the first I have ever followed – I completely found it by accident while searching for vegan black bean burgers (I’m not 100% vegan, but I do my best). I was so excited to find other amazing and delicious recipes on your site! Then I found out you are a runner, which also excited me – I JUST started running this winter/spring and am in love! I will run my first 10k on Saturday (my birthday)! Good luck to you and your husband on that sweet little nugget in your belly. Motherhood is amazing. :)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Awesome! Thanks Amy!

[Reply]

Sarena (The Non-Dairy Queen)     at 5:11 pm

I can’t wait to see this. Thanks for the review. We have a divided household here with me being vegetarian and the boys eating meat. My guys are way more aware of eating meat now though and they know the importance of health and sustainability.

I’m glad you’re feeling better!

[Reply]

Annie@stronghealthyfit     at 5:12 pm

I can’t wait to see that movie!

[Reply]

Jennifer@ knackfornutrition     at 5:13 pm

This was a great review. I can’t wait to see this movie. Although I can’t help but think the people reading your blog aren’t really the ones who need to be educated about this type of thing. I just wish it was more mainstream.

[Reply]

Casey     at 5:14 pm

I’m not a vegetarian, but I try to keep my diet focused on veggies, fruits, whole grains, etc. I can go several days without eating meat, and it won’t bother me at all. However, my fiance is the typical “meat and potatoes” guy. Recently, I’ve noticed that we have been having more meatless meals as a couple (usually he eats meat and I won’t) AND he’s been opting for salads and fruit for lunch (instead of a turkey sandwich or something). I don’t ever expect him to become a vegetarian (I’m not even sure if I will ever become a vegetarian), but at least he is taking steps in the right direction, and I’m thrilled that he has been eating healthier!

[Reply]

Lindsey     at 5:17 pm

I went ‘veggie’ as a New Year’s Resolution this year and have received mixed ‘opinions.’ Some are supportive, some couldn’t care less, some are interested, some tell me how much they love bacon (is there no other meat on the world? why is bacon the default?), the only person who seems to have any issue with my diet is my mom. She gets mad that I can’t, or won’t, her homemade sauces and soups and doesn’t understand why I’m depriving myself. I’ve told her plenty of times that I’m not depriving myself at all.

I started dating my boyfriend around the time I stopped eating meat. He is incredibly supportive and after five months of watching me find meatless dishes on menus, he’s actually cutting meat out himself and encourages me to try the tofus and faux meats I usually stay away from.

Oh, Hi to Maryann on the comment above! I’m from Lancaster County too and it’s definitely hard to explain out there. I have no moral issue with beef having grown up around dairy farms and frequently being made late to school from the Amish farmers ‘crossing’ cattle in the road.

[Reply]

Maryea {Happy Healthy Mama}     at 5:22 pm

Great review. I’m excited to see this movie when it comes to my area. The China Study was a book that single-handedly changed my diet and my life.

[Reply]

kelly     at 5:25 pm

Great post! I am not a vegetarian, but eat meatless most days. Thanks for your review.

[Reply]

Lindsay     at 5:25 pm

Awesome post, Emily!

[Reply]

Sara @BakingandWine     at 5:26 pm

So true. I feel like part of this really depends on the region you’re in though. I dated a vegan once in Austin, TX and it is SO much more accepted there, even for men. Only in Austin, of course, the rest of Texas is the BBQ is a sport, veggies suck kind of mentality but there are definitely cities out there that embrace healthier lifestyles much more than others. Whereas, where I’m at in Georgia right now…. wow, are you kidding, I haven’t seen one single vegetarian place and often the only option at the surrounding restaurants is to just order a side salad. I would hate to be a vegetarian living here.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

I had no idea about Austin – very cool!

[Reply]

Sara @BakingandWine Reply:

You should check it out one vacation. It is an incredible city! I miss it. :)

[Reply]

Lindsey     at 5:28 pm

This recap is great. I want to see this movie but I don’t think it’s playing where I live yet. I hate all the male stereotypes related to food. I’m sure that is part of the reason my boyfriend is not interested in eating a plant based diet (like I do).

[Reply]

bitt     at 5:29 pm

Did the video make your sister want to change her diet? Awesome your husband is a veggie dude!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

I think she’s pretty open to the idea of vegetarianism in general, although she has a tough dining situation in college right now. She eats vegetarian at our house, but knows she is more than welcome to order what she wants at grocery stores or restaurants.

[Reply]

jenna k     at 5:31 pm

i love this post! i’m a senior in college about to apply to medical school, and i’ve worked in microbiology research (which leads to pharmaceutical research) for over two years. but i’m a HUGE believer in preventative medicine- healthy diet and lifestyle. i have no desire to personally go completely vegetarian, but i read blogs like yours to find inspiration on how to bring veggies into my diet in a more interesting way.

[Reply]

Laura     at 5:39 pm

I asked this in your last post, but with no response, so I’ll ask again! Is your sister a vegetarian? I know she is living with you this summer and will more than likely eat with you all, so is she planning on changing her eating habits if she wasn’t vegetarian prior? Just curious, as I am about to encounter a similar situation, but my sister is demanding that I cook meat for her still…!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Hi Laura – sorry! Just getting caught up now! Nope, Sarah is not a vegetarian, but she is happy to eat plenty of meatless meals with us this summer. I’ve also told her of course she is welcome to eat whatever she likes.

[Reply]

Reading (and chickens)     at 5:47 pm

Ooh, nice review. I’m going to have to check it out!

[Reply]

Meghan     at 5:48 pm

Wow excited to see that! People are pretty judgmental towards me for being a vegetarian. I don’t get it. Especially because I am not judgemental about what anyone else eats AT ALL. I think people also always focus on what I do not eat instead of what I do eat like tons of healthy, fun foods. My mom always says “live and let live” and I think that is a great way to look at what people eat sometimes.

[Reply]

Jessica @ Stylish Stealthy & Healthy     at 5:50 pm

I would really love to see this movie. I am on the last week of a 28-day self-inflicted vegetarian challenge and I have definitely noticed a few things about how I feel and some of the hurdles vegetarians have to deal with. I’ve done vegan cleanses, etc in the past but for some reason this time I became more aware of how hard it is just to find options in restaurants and having to defend your choice every time someone hears you don’t eat meat. Anyways, I’ll step off my soapbox now but thanks for sharing, I must check this out :)

[Reply]

Michelle     at 6:00 pm

I’m so glad to hear this was an enjoyable movie! I’m a nutrition student and vegetarian who works in documentary production, so this film definitely caught my eye! I always get nervous about docs seeming too bias/extreme but it sounds like this has a good balance.

Thanks for posting your review!

[Reply]

Jesse N.     at 6:00 pm

Thanks for the review. I’ve been wanting to see the film since I saw the trailer a few months ago.

As a vegan male, I’ve also experienced the gender stereotyping, but it doesn’t seem like I’ve had it as bad as most. I work a manual labor job, and there are occasional jokes that are made about me “eating nothing but grass”. But, my co-workers see how hard I work, and they know how much I run, and that speaks for itself. I don’t actively try to convert anyone to my way of eating, and I never comment on anyone else’s food choices at work.

People do ask if my wife made me do it (which she didn’t). But it helps that we made the switch for different reasons (her for animal rights reasons, me for health reasons).

Besides, even when jokes are made, they are usually made by overweight guys who seem to be insecure about their beer bellies (not trying to make a judgmental statement, just a personal observation). Comments on anything pertaining to health from people like that have very little effect on me.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

So interesting Jesse! A lot of people ask Casey if I made him be a vegetarian too, when in fact it was HIS idea. So frustrating! Thanks for sharing your perspective! :)

[Reply]

olivewineandfood     at 6:02 pm

i can’t wait to see this!

[Reply]

Melissa     at 6:06 pm

I just read The China Study and now can’t wait to watch this movie!! Awesome review, you put into words how I feel about the book!!!

[Reply]

Jenn from Much to My Delight     at 6:11 pm

What a great post. Thank you for your open-minded approach to delivering information about food. I haven’t heard of this film, but now I’m very interested!

[Reply]

Susan     at 6:17 pm

Great post Emily. I’m not a vegetarian or vegan, and I really appreciate that you don’t preach or condemn us!! You don’t know this, but you have had a HUGE impact on how we eat. We have incorporated more grains and different veggies into our diet and I now do cook meatless meals several times per week. I got the exact same rice cooker you have and use it every day as well!! I’m glad you are feeling better and that your sister is there this summer to keep you company as you transition into your new surroundings :-) . You are loved sweet girl.

[Reply]

Jaime     at 6:23 pm

Great post! Robert and I look forward to seeing this documentary.

I have some health problems that have been seriously helped by adopting a whole foods, mostly vegan diet. We’re still working on getting over some habits, but both myself and my husband have seen a lot of benefits to our lifestyle change.

People have definitely asked him if I made him do it. Or they’ll “joke” about how I’m not around so he can get some “real” food.

I think that there’s a fine line we can walk, between sharing something that is challenging yet helpful and being humble and compassionate. Too often when I talk to people who have “alternative” lifestyles, they forget that they were not always eating veg or running marathons or cycling to work. And that doesn’t really help anyone.

Thanks again.

[Reply]

Katie     at 6:38 pm

Wonderfully written post! Though I’m not a vegetarian, I have moved towards a more plant-based diet in the last year and have taken my meat-loving husband (sometimes grubbling) along with me. Recently, my mission has been to show him that not only can meals without meat be yummy but filling too. He’s coming around. Hopefully we can see this movie for further convincing! :)

[Reply]

Christine     at 7:23 pm

I guess it’s Vegetarian Week (or something like that) starting today, so nice timing! I’m not a vegetarian, but I’ve cut way back- I eat meat maybe 3 times a week tops, and very rarely red. I think it’s amazing how many more options there are for people, compared to ten, or even five, years ago.

[Reply]

Alaina     at 7:32 pm

This definitely looks like a movie I would love to see! That stinks that your husband is treated like that just because of his healthy lifestyle. At least he’s not pressured by it and continues to lead a healthy, inspring life. :-)

[Reply]

anna     at 7:35 pm

I’m not a vegetarian and have no intentions of being one. Your blog and KERF helped me decide to reduce my meat consumption from EVERY MEAL to once a day. You definitely proved to me that plant based dishes (such as the cocoa quinoa) can still be tasty without the meat.

[Reply]

Kelly     at 8:26 pm

And this post is why I love your blog. :) Right on!

[Reply]

Christina     at 8:32 pm

I was hoping to see FOK when it came to NY but I wasn’t able to make it. The male views on vegetarianism makes me so angry! My fiance eats chicken and fish but admits that he feels great when he doesn’t. At home we eat a plant-based diet but if we go to his friends house he’ll always have a piece of meat and complain about how he feels later. His friends also tease him, saying he’s a vegetarian like I am, that he’s just *going* into my *ways*.

I don’t get how it’s such a gender based idea, I wish there was something we could all do! I think the story of the firemen is great! They should be shared and praised.

I just want to say my fiance isn’t the type of guy who really cares what other people thing, but for some odd reason he won’t admit any kind of plant-based diet notions to his friends.

[Reply]

Anna     at 8:35 pm

I’m assuming Rip Esselstyn is somehow related to Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, the renowned cardiac surgeon? I saw the movie PlanEat, which is very similar to Forks over Knives, a couple months ago and it featured the work of Caldwell Esselstyn.

[Reply]

Teresa Kato Reply:

@Anna… Rip is Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn’s son. I met Rip, Dr. Esselstyn and his wife, Ann at a conference last fall. Vibrant, healthy, wonderful people… a walking testament to eating a vegan (they call it plant-based) diet.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Yep – it’s his son!

[Reply]

jane richardson     at 8:41 pm

We won a copy of Rip Esselstyn’s book The Engine 2 Diet” at a Healthy Eating Club dinner at the Whole Foods Venice (CA) Market. The main dish was “Raise the Roof Sweet Potato-Vegetable Lasagna” It’s fabulous! It would be great to see you make that, Emily, and display on the blog. It’s gorgeous and tasty. I’m not a vegetarian, but admire your commitment, and eat far less meat after following your blog. You also inspire my running! Many thanks.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Casey just bought the book, so I’ll have to check out the lasagna!

[Reply]

Teresa Kato Reply:

We love the lasagna, too. My daughter has made it for us several times… yummy!

[Reply]

Rachelle     at 8:44 pm

I can truly say you’ve inspired me to eat healthier with your blog.
And what you’ve taught me is that it is still super YUMMY!!!!
I hadn’t ever really made anything vegan before I saw your blog, and I was so impressed w/ the first few recipes I’ve made.
Thank you for the time you put in on this blog, it inspires me to do better. And I know I can always come here for awesome recipe inspiration!
:-)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks Rachelle!

[Reply]

Kristin (Cook, Bake, Nibble)     at 8:53 pm

Wonderful writeup about Forks over Knives. I saw it on Friday and couldn’t agree more!!

xo

[Reply]

Katherine     at 9:10 pm

I want to see this so badly!

[Reply]

Lu @ A Mix of it All     at 9:37 pm

I’ve been a vegetarian, I’ve been a meat eater. I struggle with this dichotomy almost daily. I’ve heard good things about this movie. I’ll have to see if I can find it in town or Netflix. The salad you made looks amazing.

[Reply]

Sarah K     at 9:48 pm

That movie sounds really interesting and I’d love to see it. I’m not a vegetarian but a few of my friends are. I’ve thought about trying it myself but don’t quite know if I want to start. I’d love to find out more reasons to start and other people’s opinions on the subject.

[Reply]

Bopril     at 10:00 pm

I loved this, and am looking forward to seeing the movie. I agree with all points and wanted to say (because although I read regularly, I rarely comment) that as a vegetarian, your blog has become a go-to resource for recipes, advice and just like-minded philosophy. Thanks so much for that!

[Reply]

Lauren @ vegology     at 10:00 pm

I appreciate your honesty about feeling frustrated over male diet stereotypes. I know that my boyfriend Kyle catches a lot more flak than I do for our vegetarian diet. I share your disappointment in people who judge others based on what is on their plates (and what is NOT on their plates, for that matter). Great review, I’ll have to check out the movie.

[Reply]

Jennifer (The Gourmetour)     at 10:50 pm

I just recently turned vegetarian, after years of minimal meat eating. I finally decided to commit to focusing on healthy well rounded meals that did not revolve around meat. My choice makes complete sense and has me sooo excited to move forward and see what I can concoct in the kitchen!
But I must say, that ever since I have told people publicly I have had the hardest time with negative reactions! People love to make snide remarks and mock my efforts. Even some of my best friends laugh at me because I was able to so easily give in to others peer pressure during my initial stages of transformation!
I will note though, as this is my point to my comment, that I have noticed men (those of which are not my close guy friends) are the toughest critics.. even to me as a woman!
I completely agree and understand how a male making this decision would get the worst criticism from others!
Casey clearly has an amazing support system, and is a stronger man than any of whom give him a hard time about his vegetarianism.
You two rock! I can’t wait to see this film!

[Reply]

emily     at 11:10 pm

hey emily!! not a vegetarian but i love your blog! i did want to let you know that unlike some other food/healthy living blogs that i read often (and enjoy), i feel like you really DO project a positive, nonjudgmental attitude that i really appreciate. i make your vegan black beans burgers once/week and eat them for lunch for like, 5 days straight! you are doing a fantastic job of informing people of the benefits of your lifestyle but you don’t have to stand on a soap box to do it! thank you!!! (also, i appreciate that you haven’t been perfect in your pregnancy diet. i mean, it’s perfect for you because it’s very healthy and you’re eating things that you and baby g WANT to eat, but you don’t come across as “holier than thou” when it comes to craving a gosh-darn CARB every once in a while!! thank you again!)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks Emily! :)

[Reply]

Stephanie @ LoveLaughterLight     at 12:31 am

I have contemplated a vegetarian lifestyle for quite some time. I rarely eat meat now, but I think my body will thank me when I rid myself of it completely. I do love cheese, but let’s be honest, it’s not doing me any favors when I eat way more than an alloted serving! My diet needs a major overhaul before it takes its toll on me in the form of any one of the many dis-eases our country suffers from because of horrible manufactured food-like products we consume daily.

[Reply]

McKayla @ Green Groats     at 7:16 am

I’ve got to check out this movie. I’ve just become vegetarian in the past month, and I’m loving the new lifestyle so far.

I especially like your quote “you can most definitely eat to live, while still living to eat.”

So true!

[Reply]

Heather     at 8:10 am

I saw the movie as well. You can read my review on my blog if you want, but I like that you brought the man aspect into the discussion. My fiance is constantly being teased at work for eating salads over Wendy’s and chomping on carrots throughout the day. I think the marketing door swings both ways too. The special K diet and honestly all diet foods are aimed at women. God forbid if we eat full fat ice cream. Oh and I love how it seems that only women get constipated.

[Reply]

Cassie @ Back to Her Roots     at 8:19 am

My husband gets made fun of CONSTANTLY at his job for eating a plant-based diet (we aren’t vegetarians, but meat is definitely not the “center” of our diets). He works at a hardware store with lots of men doing manual labor and anytime he sits down for lunch, people scoff at his food while they eat their person and can put up with them, but it is still so unbelievable to me. They say some ridiculous things to him like, “HA! Look at you, trying to be all healthy. Why would you want to do that?” And he tries to explain how good our food is and how better he feels, but it all falls on deaf ears.

[Reply]

Cassie @ Back to Her Roots Reply:

Whoa, part of my comment disappeared in the middle. Weird. It should say:

“He works at a hardware store with lots of men doing manual labor and anytime he sits down for lunch, people scoff at his food while they eat their hamburgers from McDonalds. It’s a good thing he is a strong person and can put up with them…”

[Reply]

Christa     at 9:02 am

Emily:
I just wanted to take a quick second to tell you that you are doing exactly what you want with your blog. I stumbled upon it a few months ago and in one super boring/uneventful day at work I think I read every past post and have read every post since. You make your readers feel welcomed into your’s and Casey’s lives while still retaining some sense of privacy and (I hope) normalcy. While I am not a vegetarian…as a good little Southern girl I just can’t give up my fried chicken…I love seeing the recipes you create and the meals you guys have when you go out to eat. You and your blog have opened my eyes to the fact that being vegetarian is not just about lettuce and tofu; a lot of the foods I enjoy are in your diet and most of your meals, but the meat component is just missing. So, thank you and good luck in your journey to educate the masses. O yeah, and Congratulations to yourself and Casey on the pending arrival of your little one!!! I know you will both be excellent parents and your baby is coming into a happy loving home/extended family. God bless yawl :)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thank you so much Christa! :)

[Reply]

Rachel Jacobs     at 9:10 am

Amen Emily! My husband and I have gone vegetarian and suprisingly enough he isn’t ridiculed for his choices. He actually uses his new way of eating to speak to others about the benefits and what he is doing to keep himself, and our family, healthier.
I have to say I love that telling people I am a vegetarian sparks conversation and hopefully leaves them with a bit of knowledge on how to be a healthier eater.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

That’s awesome!

[Reply]

Jess (In My Healthy Opinion)     at 9:24 am

Great review, Emily! I really, really want to see this movie at some point. My husband and I are both vegan, and while most people are really just curious of our lifestyle, some do kind of ridicule him for his choice, and me too because they think I FORCE him to be vegan! That couldn’t be further from the truth. I think once people become more educated (through books and films like FON), they see the health and Earth benefits and aren’t so critical.

[Reply]

Jess (In My Healthy Opinion) Reply:

By FON I meant FOK… talk about a grammar error! :)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

A lot of people ask me how I “got Casey” to start eating vegetarian, when it was actually HIS idea!

[Reply]

Ash @ Good Taste Healthy Me     at 9:31 am

I can’t wait to see this movie! But unfortunately it’s not in my area at the moment. :(

[Reply]

Fran@ Broken Cookies Don't Count     at 9:42 am

Thanks, Emily! This post was excellent. I haven’t read the book or seen the movie yet, but I deal with the same issues as Casey. People give me a hard time sometimes because of being a vegetarian. All of the usual things, it won’t hurt you to eat a little fish or meat. Well I feel that my vegetarian choices as well as being a Weight Watchers lifetime member for over 20 years has helped me to reach the age of 60 and taking NO medications whatever. I’m very proud of that and I wish I could make more people understand that. Thanks again for helping to spread the word.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Congrats on your success!

[Reply]

Paige     at 9:45 am

I can’t wait to see this movie!I love when films open up new viewpoints :)

[Reply]

Brittney     at 9:54 am

I think you bring up a really interesting point about Casey/men being vegetarian, and how people view that. Neither my husband or I are full on vegetarians, but we eat vegetarian much of the time, and I feel like people seem much more surprised/confused by HIM being semi-vegetarian than they do about me. They ask lots of questions and act like it does not make sense, even when I explain why he chooses to eat this way and how reasonable/logical it is. There definitely seems to be a double standard and people seem to think vegetarian men are not manly enough if they choose not to eat meat.

[Reply]

Ashley @ Nourishing the Soul     at 10:29 am

I just saw Forks Over Knives on Sunday! I hadn’t heard of it before but it happened to be playing when we went to the theater. It was ironic because Justin and I have been doing a month of vegetarianism, so it added fuel to our fire, so to speak ;-) I am actually writing a post about our experience now and linking to you!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Awesome – thanks Ashley!

[Reply]

Amber K     at 11:08 am

This sounds like such a good movie! I can’t wait to see it.

[Reply]

Tiffany     at 12:02 pm

I so want to see this movie! While I am not a vegetarian, I absolutely believe in incorporating healthy vegetarian meals into your diet. My family has a history of high cholesterol and heart disease so it was very important to me to limit how much meat I eat during the week….or at least cut out as much red meat as possible. My man loves his meat and potatoes and I think him watching this movie will help him reach his goals in living a healthier life and diet. Thanks!

[Reply]

Lissa     at 12:10 pm

Thanks for sharing your thoughts and insights.

Welcome to the Pacific Northwest, you must try hiking in the Olympics, delightful when the weather cooperates but doable anytime.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Definitely on my list!

[Reply]

Pauline     at 12:13 pm

Thank you for this post. I am a vegetarian and I know that part of the reason my boyfriend may never be able to give up meat completely is because of the societal notion that he would not be a “real man” if he does. Such a shame. But I appreciate people like you (and movies such as these) bringing this issue to light.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks Pauline!

[Reply]

Jacquelynn     at 12:19 pm

I cannot wait to see this movie! It is playing in Cleveland starting this weekend. Since I am still visiting family in Ohio, I am debating driving up there to see it :) If I could only convince one of my non-veg family members to go, I think they would reconsider their eating habits.

[Reply]

Mari @ itsgoodno.blogspot.com     at 1:18 pm

I try to eat meat sparingly, but sometimes with lunch there are not many easy options. However I was thinking of your post today when i went to my usual lunch place and asked if they had veggie burgers and was disappointed to learn they did not. So, I left. I went to a mediterranean take out place and got a mushroom, onion, greens and hummus wrap. It was delish and I felt really great about the choice. Thanks for the inspiration.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

That is awesome! Makes me smile. :)

[Reply]

LauraJayne     at 1:36 pm

Great review – I definitely want to see this movie! I have learned, firsthard, how healing a vegetarian diet can be. While I never want to be a judgemental vegetarian, I do believe that a vegetarian diet helped me to re-connect with food and health when I needed it most!

[Reply]

Ashley O. @ The Vegetable Life     at 1:41 pm

I would love to see this movie and show my meat-loving husband!

[Reply]

Abby     at 2:49 pm

I completely advocate eating a lot of fruits and vegetables and occasionally nuts, but I think that eating high quality, sustainable meat on occasion (and this means fish too), maybe a few times a week, is good for you.

If you can get lean meat as well as eggs, hopefully gotten at a farmer’s market or a credible farm, I think that you should eat it. I was a vegetarian for a long time, but my problem was actually grains. I would just overeat all grain products, always. Getting away from more grains has helped me stop binge eating.

I just don’t trust grain products and aside from a bit of dark chocolate or some yogurt now and then, I think that the carby-sugary foods are pretty bad for you. I dunno. Some people can tolerate grain products, whole grains, etc, but I used to overeat steel cut oatmeal, if you can believe it. Legumes are testy too, though on occasion I think they’re fine.

My favorite grain is probably white rice though! It’s versatile and delicious and often accompanies Asian cuisine… so yay :)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

I think my post and your comment are both great examples of the idea that you have to do what works best for YOU! :) Everyone really does tolerate grains differently. For me, being a vegetarian goes far beyond health benefits too.

[Reply]

Marta     at 4:16 pm

Hi Emily, love the baby belly!!

I totally agree with you, the “manly” food marketing is so annoying. I don’t know if it’s just my man or if most guys are like this, but this type of attitude doesn’t bother him at all. He’s not totally veg, hasn’t been able to shake his Butter Chicken addiction ;), but he chooses veg the rest of the time and it still surprises our family and friends. He’s become quite the advocate of plant based foods simply because of how good he feels. And while our friends are hitting that 30 plus age and struggling with their beer + rib guts, Jeremy has never looked better. I think that alone keeps our buddies from bugging him about his veggie lifestyle.

M :)

[Reply]

Marta     at 4:20 pm

that’s too bad Cassie. My guy never gets that even though he’s pretty loud about his (mostly) veggie choices. But I bet he looks a million times better than any of those burger-eating guys and that should make up for their ignorance ;)

[Reply]

Amykinz @ Foodie4Healing     at 8:55 pm

I REALLY want to see the movie, but I have to wait at least 8 more weeks until this baby comes out. Reason? My midwife, kinesiologist AND endocronologist are all urging me to consume meat. For the past (almost) year, I have led a vegetarian-only diet, so I wasn’t thrilled when I was diagnosed w/Gestational Diabetes (again) and that the only thing keeping me off insulin is to consume meat. I know if I watch the movie I’ll want to go back to vegetarianism. I do plan to return to that lifestyle after baby, but until then, I need to do what’s necessary to keep me off the insulin. I am envious that you are doing so well being pregnant on a vegetarian diet. I wish I could say the same.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Oh wow, I have never heard of needing to eat meat for gestational diabetes. I’m not sure what I would do! What a tough situation – I’m so sorry. Sounds like you are already a great mom though, doing what you need for your baby. :)

[Reply]

Amykinz @ Foodie4Healing Reply:

Gestational Diabetes is all about balancing carbs with fiber and protein and for some reason, the only protein that seems to be keeping my blood sugar levels low is hormone-free, grass-fed beef and chicken. I still eat nuts, nut butters, cheese, etc, but they don’t do as good of a job. It’s really bizarre!

[Reply]

Katherina @ Zephyr Runs     at 8:17 am

I can’t wait to see Forks Over Knives!
Jon and I are vegetarians at home but not always outside the home (well, he’s not) so we haven’t encountered the male-vegetarian-quizzical-look… I don’t look forward to that.
We’ve been craving hard scientific numbers rather than countless opinions, maybe Forks Over Knives can give us some insight or references to other studies.

[Reply]

Cindy Robinson     at 11:23 am

Wow, I am blown away by this post. I enjoyed everything about it. I truly love your take on all of these aspects, especially the sterotypes, and your ability to be open to all choices. You make me feel comfortable being someone who is not vegetarian. The more I read your blog, the more intrigued I have become about this lifestyle. You make your healthy living look like fun, and delicious, and nothing to be embarrassed about (sometimes I get funny looks from my husband when I get almond milk, or make vegetarian meals). I feel even better about leaning toward a healthier way of life. And perhaps one day my husband will follow suit. Thanks for being you Emily!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks Cindy! :)

[Reply]

Rachel     at 11:40 am

I know this comment is late (catching up on blogs since vacation :) )

BUT wanted to share that I read Dr. Esselstyn’s book HOW TO REVERSE AND PREVENT HEART DISEASE and made it my own personal choice and experiment to follow his guidelines – which not only are plant based, but cut out oils and fats – even healthy ones.

I haven’t experienced high cholesterol, but have my blood work done once a year for work/health insurance purposes. A year ago my cholesterol was 152 – healthy by all standards. Dr. E recommends keeping that number under 150 to never have heart disease. AFTER being on the diet for 3 months I had shed 10 lbs of fat and my cholesterol was 132.

Great book as a follow-up or added value to the movie.

[Reply]

Gabrielle     at 11:52 am

“Forks Over Knives” finally opened in my city of Atlanta, last week, and I’m headed out to see it later this afternoon – can’t wait!

I became a vegetarian in 2006 and vegan in 2008, and there is no looking back. I also try not to judge, but to educate as much as possible, as I realize that most people simply do not know much about the origins of the foods they eat. Often they do not want to know, but then there are those who are open to learning, and making adjustments based on what they’ve learned.

Education and learning are key, as knowledge is a powerful thing, and our food choices, while they are choices, affect our own health, the health of our planet, and most of all, the animals.

[Reply]

nationals read 50 shades of grey     at 12:24 am

Normally I don’t read article on blogs, but I wish to say that this write-up very compelled me to check out and do it! Your writing style has been surprised me. Thank you, very great article.

[Reply]

TrackBack URI

Leave a comment

(required)

(required)




    Welcome.

    A resource for healthy recipes, cooking tips, and inspiration for active living. Welcome!

    @DailyGarnish

    On Facebook.

    Favorite Things

    On My Recipage.

    Categories



© 2014 Daily Garnish
All content is protected by copyright. Please do not reproduce in any form.
Blog design by Splendid Sparrow