about me

    Emily Malone

    culinary arts grad. nutrition facts lover. vegetarian chef. marathon runner. country music maniac. failed dog trainer. barre fanatic. loving mama.

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    EmilyBMalone@gmail.com

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    1/2 Marathon - 1:57:39

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    A Look Back.



Let’s Go Grocery Shopping.

It probably comes as no surprise that I absolutely love grocery shopping.  I probably like it a little less now that I have a grabby, shrieking sidekick, but it is still one of my favorite weekly tasks.

Now that Cullen is a bit older (ha! such an old man!) and I’m getting the hang of this whole parenting game, I’m really feeling the focus of my writing being pulled back to food.  Of course I love talking about him too, but going forward I’m hoping to do a lot more posts about food, ingredients, menu planning, and all those other things that come together to make up a healthy lifestyle.  I hope you’ll enjoy them!

Today, I thought we could take a peek into the grocery cart.  I’m not one of those people that ever really notices what anyone else is buying at the store.  I’m usually too focused on getting in and out without a major meltdown (Cullen, not me) or diaper explosion (Cullen again…). 

Although I did see a lady in the parking lot today filling up the back of her VW Bug with nothing but giant gallons of Sunny D and Marie Callendar’s frozen meals.  I kind of wanted to know what she had planned.

But onto my own groceries!  Typically I do one or two bigger trips each month, stocking up on pantry essentials, canned goods, cleaners, etc. – as well as replenishing our fresh produce and perishables.  We’re actually getting ready to move in a few weeks (not across the country for once, just across Seattle!), so I’m only restocking perishables and must-haves, as we’re trying to eat down the pantry to lighten the move. 

Here is today’s haul…

Beverages

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  • Almond milk – every grocery run includes stocking up at least one of these.  We use it our oatmeal, cereal, coffee, and smoothies, so we tend to go through 1-ish per week. 
  • Orange juice – I got hooked on OJ while I was pregnant, and now I just can’t quit.  I typically mix it with sparkling water for a fun dinner drink, and I like to always have some on hand for making sauces and salad dressings.
  • Kombucha – this isn’t a regular grocery item, but more of a recent splurge.  After my bout with mastitis, my midwife told me to increase my probiotics, so I’m using that as an excuse to buy my favorite extravagant beverage.  Plus we don’t drink alcohol, so this sort of replaces that cost, right?

Household Products

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I try to be as green as I can, so I usually shell out an extra dollar or two for the natural and more chemical-free cleaners and products.  I also always watch for sales in this area, and stock up when I see good discounts.  I do my best to keep it natural, but occasionally buy conventional things like Drano when the green stuff just isn’t doing it.

Snacks & Things

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  • Field Roast Veggie Dogs – my favorite quick protein source!  I love these on a hotdog bun, or chopped up and added to a stir-fry or grain dish.
  • Organic Tofu – I usually buy 4 blocks each week, and we typically have tofu in our meals in 2 or 3 of our weekly dinners.  I know there are a lot of opinions on soy, but I’m really comfortable with what I consider to be our limited and lightly-processed soy consumption.  I always buy organic tofu, usually extra-firm.
  • Clif Bars – I wish I could tell you that I always make my own snack bars, bake my own granola, and have freshly sliced fruit on hand for whenever I need something quick.  In reality, life happens, babies cry, lunch gets delayed, and I need something as easy as opening a wrapper.  I buy the Mojo bars for me, and Casey takes a box of Clif bars to his office each week. 
  • Clif Shot Blocks – not usually part of our grocery haul.  I grabbed these for Casey for his upcoming marathon training runs.
  • Wonton Wrappers – I don’t have a specific plan for these yet, but if all goes well you’ll see them in a new recipe soon enough.  I usually head to the store with a few recipe ideas in mind, and make sure to grab any specialty items I might need. 

Organic Veggies

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Once I found out I was pregnant, I started paying much closer attention to the labels on my food.  I’m kind of a cheapo when it comes to buying things – I live for sales and coupons, and I go to extreme (and probably absurd) efforts to find the lowest price for something possible (which drives my husband insane). 

So initially it was hard for me to wrap my brain around often paying double for something, when what appeared to be the exact same thing was across the aisle for half price.  But it’s not the same thing, and I have to remind myself of that. 

I typically buy a lot of organic greens, but they didn’t look too hot this week, so I ended up with only two bunches of Swiss chard.  I also grabbed four bunches of asparagus (can’t get enough), a bag of red potatoes, and a few avocados (not a veggie, but still organic).  I actually don’t usually get organic avocados, but they were 2 for $4 this week, so I figured – why not?

(Conventional) Fungus & Fruit

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Yep, fungus.  It’s a regular grocery item.  We eat a TON of mushrooms.  A frightening amount, really.  I roast them, I sauté them, I add them to salads, and I can eat an entire pint all on my own.  We can never have too many on hand.

In the fruit department, this week I grabbed a bag of giant navel oranges, and a few lemons for a recipe I hope to make later this week.  I always buy conventional oranges or bananas, but most other fruit – apples, grapes, berries – I hold out for reasonable organics. 

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I usually get a few pieces of fruit for snacking, and some extra for juicing!

Baby Needs

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This category is pretty small since Cullen doesn’t typically need very much.  We still cloth diaper (and love it!), but due to some leakage (and diaper removal) issues, I’m switching to disposables for overnights.  We’ll see how it goes.

One more exciting item in today’s cart – baby oatmeal cereal! 

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We gave Cullen his first solids tonight (more on that to come), and it was a huge success.  It was very messy, but very fun.

That’s it for today’s shopping run!  Hopefully you found that mildly interesting.  That whole trip cost me about $125, which sounds a bit high, but there were some pricier items in this trip too – cleaners, diapers, Kombuchas, etc – that I don’t normally buy each week. 

I try to stick to a budget of around $300-400 a month for groceries (which includes things like cleaners, baby needs, etc. – not just food).  I have no idea if that’s high, low, or average (probably more high than low) – but right now it works for our needs and overall budget.  We eat 90% of our meals at home, including lunches (Casey packs his), so we don’t have many food expenses outside of this.

As much as I do LOVE grocery shopping, I absolutely loathe bringing the bags in and putting it all away.  I often let them sit on the counter for an hour or two before they finally make it into the pantry and fridge.  But once I do get it all put away, I love the feeling of opening a fully stocked fridge.  Who’s with me?

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220 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Runmarun     at 7:49 am

Great post- how exciting to be moving- hope all goes well! I bought the same brand of grain cereal for our baby last weekend and have started solids too- it’s been a lot of fun. And Clif bars are pretty delightful. :)

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Carrie     at 7:50 am

Ha, I also leave groceries sitting on the counter for a ridiculously long time. I love grocery shopping, but I’ve never done it with a baby so I can’t really comment on that, sounds like it would be a challenge to get used to.

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Jayna     at 7:52 am

I love doing the shopping, but HATE carrying it in!!! I too live for sales, coupons, and my favorite- the managers specials areas (at our store LOTS of natural and organic stuff ends up there- half price!).

In terms of cost- we spend around $400/mo for a family of four with no babies. I don’t generally buy organic though (except for farmer’s markets. . . can’t wait!). We also have a MASSIVE backyard garden starting this year so hopefully it will take us down to around $300 or less at the store/mo (and you can’t get more fresh then picking it in your own backyard!)

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Emily Malone Reply:

I am so excited to plant a seed garden this year! FRESH HERBS – yay! :)

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Krissy @ Shiawase Life     at 7:55 am

I think that’s a pretty low amount to spend for a family with a baby! Kudos! :)

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KaraHadley     at 8:01 am

I have no clue if your budget is normal either. I know that I spend about $35 a week (so $140/month) on just myself. And I don’t buy nearly enough organic (because it’s not available, oddly enough), but I should. Or, I should at least stick to my “eat the skin” rule (which is if I eat the skin it should be organic, because I can never remember the dirty dozen or the clean 15).
But I would love to hear more about groceries and meal planning and whatnot. I’m about to move in with my boyfriend and I’ve never meal planned or budgetted for anyone but myself, so I’m more than a little lost.

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Emily Malone Reply:

I use the “eat the skin” rule too! Hence the conventional oranges and lemons.

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Meredith Reply:

I’m in the same boat as Kara — I spend about $40-50 a week on myself (in Austin where food is well priced), but I’m about to move in with my boyfriend in DC (where food is not well priced, as you know Emily), and I really want to be good about budgeting and meal planning. I’m already pretty good about making batches of things and freezing them, like turkey burgers or chopped veg for stir fry, but I always need tips! Can’t wait to see what you have in mind!

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Emily Malone Reply:

Moving to DC! So exciting! Worth the price. :)

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Lindsay     at 8:02 am

Love this post – I love grocery shopping myself, and I love reading about others groceries, for some odd reason!

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Kim @ girlevolving     at 8:04 am

We love Kombucha, too, but not the price. I’ve been drinking raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar with water. It has some of the same benefits (healthy bacteria), the same tartness, and is MUCH cheaper!

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Chase - the CHASE project Reply:

I just started drinking the apple cider vinegar too!

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Michelle Reply:

I’ve actually wanted to try doing this– but is it okay for your teeth? In my mind it seems like the acidity would be bad? I’m not sure! What’s your recipe/ratio of apple cider vinegar to water? Any tips?

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Kim @ girlevolving Reply:

I do a 1/4c. each day, sometimes in just a glass of water (stronger) or sometimes to 320z. in my nalgene. I’ve read conflicting things about teeth – that if it’s diluted it’s fine, but also that you should drink it all at once, wait 20 minutes, then brush. I have a dental appt. next month and plan to ask.

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Michelle Reply:

Sweet– thanks for the tips! I’m sure it can’t be any worse for teeth than drinking a soda would be! I’m going to try it! :)

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Emily Malone Reply:

Dumb question — does it taste terrible? I know a lot of people drink lemon water in the morning and basically just choke it down for the health benefits. Is this similar, or is the taste actually enjoyable? I’m interested in trying it, just wondering if I could actually stomach it.

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Kim @ girlevolving Reply:

I actually love the taste. I think it tastes very similar to kombucha – that same tart/tang. I look forward to drinking it!

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Emily Malone Reply:

Awesome – I’m going to try it! Thanks for the tips!

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Michelle (The Runner's Plate) Reply:

I actually think the ACV drink tastes pretty terrible. I like kombucha but the ACV is something I choke down for the health benefits.

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Marty Reply:

I drink 1/2 of a squeezed lemon in hot water every morning sweetened with stevia, tho honey would do. No need to gulp
It down! Sometimes I drink lightly sweetened lemon water all day. Meyers lemons are available at Fred Meyers lately here, I’m loving them.

Where are you moving to in Seattle?

I love grocery shopping and deals, using coupons (tho rarely are their nutrition-based ones I can use)! I try and put my groceries right away as it usually coincides with getting dinner ready too. I prob spend $300-$400 for two of us a month. I scout the reduced priced items in the store, ESP the 50% off bin at Fred Meyers and the markdown produce, if it’s not too bad.

I stopped buying orange juice because it’s extra plastic to recycle, and tho we love OJ, I now prefer to have the extra fiber eating whole oranges.

All greens I now buy organic, and when theyre sad looking, I’m sad because I try and eat them every day, chard, Kale, spinach or collards. It is hard paying 2x the cost for some organics, but the light skinned produce, ESP celery, onions, greens, apples, pears, I just can’t compromise anymore.

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Heather Reply:

My fiance and brother-in-law are on the “apple cider vinegar diet” as they call it. It’s helping with their GERD and his Gout and they’re completely off medication for both!

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Amy S. Reply:

What is the apple cider vinegar diet? My husband has gout and a few other medical issues, and we’re both searching for natural remedies!

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Heather Reply:

It’s just a nickname they call it. They take about a teaspoon three times a day I believe. Since it’s all natural I would say your husband should give it a try. Forewarning: it tastes horrible. I suggest diluting it with water and taking it as a shot haha.

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Alex     at 8:07 am

Wow! I’m really impressed with how much food you buy and how little it is costing you… Either food is cheaper in Seattle or I’m going completely overboard with my shopping!
We are 2 in our household (soon to be 3) and we’ve been spending about $1000 a month on food lately (that is with amking all our meals at home). We live in Montreal, ok granted we’ve just moved here from across the Atlantic so had to stock up on a lot of essentials, but still.
I quizzed a few other friends who are not vegan and do not buy all organic (like we do) and they average $1000/month on food too (for 2 people).
So if anything, I think $300/$400 a month on food is amazing!
Just to compare… how much does a bottle of Kombucha cost you? Here it’s about $4.
Also, we don’t have a car and there is no wholefoods or Trader Joe’s in Montreal so I have to make do with the local health food store, I occasionally go to the big supermarket, but not so much since prices on veggies are still pretty high for non organic produce.

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Jen Reply:

I don’t think you’re going overboard Alex! I live in Vancouver (BC), and the cost of groceries here is about the same – food in Canada definitely costs more than in the US, especially dairy and meats. In addition, the types of coupons available in the US are almost non-existent here. We have a family of three, and we spend at least $700 on food each month….it would be closer to your amount if we didn’t have the option of crossing the border into Bellingham for butter, milk and other groceries (I stock up at Trader Joe’s each visit). And gas (which is at least $.48 cheaper per litre), but that’s a whole other rant!!!

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Emily Malone Reply:

I have no idea what grocery shopping cost comparisons might look like in other countries, but I definitely save a lot here by finding stores like Trader Joe’s and Fred Meyer. Good idea to stock up when you’re here!

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Emily Malone Reply:

Another commenter shared that food is much more expensive in Canada, so that’s probably part of it. Our kombucha is $3 per bottle. Stores like Trader Joe’s make a big difference too for frozen items, nuts, dried fruits, etc.!

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Ginna Reply:

Wow 1000 for food for 2???? Must be Canada. I’d say $300-500 for two is reasonable. We follow Dave Ramsey’s budget stuff and that is what we came up with.

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Cassie @ Back to Her Roots Reply:

It’s definitely a Canada thing. My husband is Canadian and we went up there for Canadian Thanksgiving a few years ago and I went out an bought all the food for the meal it was almost twice what I would spend at home. It was an expensive (but delicious!) dinner.

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Clare Reply:

That makes me feel a lot better! Whenever I read about grocery budgets I wonder where I’m going so far wrong, because we spend a LOT for just two people (similarly, we rarely eat out & pack all our lunches too). Seems like everything is so much cheaper in the US than in Canada!

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Alex Reply:

Ginna, I’m checking that Dave Ramsey dude ;)

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Anne Reply:

Weird. I live in Montreal, downtown, we are two and we eat 70% organic and very well I must say and we put about 75$/week max. We never go to big grocery stores, too expensive…

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Andrea Reply:

Another Canadian commenter here…when I heard that you spend 100 bucks a month on food I thought that was absurd! My family of three spends at least 200 dollars a week on food, this week we spent 500. So I guess that averages from 1000-1500 dollars a month. When it was 5 of us living here it was definitely closer to the 2000 dollar a month. And we don’t buy anything organic to boot! Crazy.

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Alex Reply:

Anne,I don’t know where you shop and what kind of food you buy but we need to talk ;)
I live in Le Plateau. Metro is freaking expensive so I shop at the local fruiterie and at “C’est la vie” which is my local health food store (a bit like Rachel Berri). Their organic veg are sometimes cheaper than in Metro, always organic, and mostly local.
We are vegan but frankly in terms of shopping I don’t think it makes much difference whether you eat animal products or not, what we don’t spend on meat and cheese (cheese seems to be horribly expensive in this country!) we spend on things like tempeh/tofu and other speciality product (though we don’t buy any processed fake meat, cheese or yogurt).
Bread is horribly expensive here we’ve noticed, we’ve been given a bread machine but then realised that flour is terribly expensive too! I buy all my beans, grains, seeds and nuts from “Club Organic” on Frontenac which does organic bulk bags (I buy 2kg at the time, because again, we don’t have a car, and I am 8 months pregnant so quite limited).
I’ve switched from almond butter to sunflower seed butter because it’s half the price (discovered it’s actually delicious!). We reuse our tea bags several times because a box of 20 good quality tea bags (we generally go for Rooibos tea) is never under $5.99.
I had to stock up on a few superfood when we first arrived (spirulina, hemp seeds, flax seeds) which obviously brought the bill super high but we won’t buy those again for a while. We also go through a pot of coconut oil ($12) in about 3/4 weeks.
I grow my own sprouts and I’ve just planted seeds to grow my own herbs, tomatoes, and cress (fingers crossed they won’t die)
My husband is keeping a close eye on the food spending and it’s a major source of stress for the 2 of us, even tho we are clear on the fact that the best nutrition is a priority for us.

Food shopping was so much cheaper when I was omni, on the lookout for cheap deals (I cringe at the thought of the meat I use to eat because it must have been the worse quality!) and never eating organic…

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Anne Reply:

Oh, I live also on the Plateau ! So you have to discover the little grocery store called Segal (St-Laurent and Duluth), very very cheap, for evrything in fact, we buy a bit of greens/fruits there (not much organic) but organics product are so cheap !!! (We don’t eat meat) Grains, tea, coffee, soy drinks, dairies, I mean every-thing ! It’s incredible. Next door is Frenco, health food/bulk and organic fruits, prices are ok. We also go at PA (on park avenue) for the weekly specials. I hope it will help you. Plateau near Laurier (east) is more expensive in fact.

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Anne Reply:

You can have delivery at both places (8 months pregnant I understand…) PA have a “weekly letter”, you can see all the deals that way… (oh and sorry for my english, i’m french.)

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Alex Reply:

Merci Anne! You are not the first one to tell me about this store, so I went today and it was closed, but I will go back in the week! The reviews on yelp are very good, if indeed I can save on my food shopping then I’ll take the bus ride for it!
I went to Frenco and got some bulk granola. What is PA?

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Anne Reply:

Yes closed on sundays. For PA:http://www.supermarchepa.com/eng/specials/parc/page1.html

Alex Reply:

Oh that’s fabulous! Thank you xx

Chase - the CHASE project     at 8:10 am

I totally hate putting groceries away too! I make myself do it IMMEDIATELY because otherwise they would sit there for (more than) a couple hours and the refrigerated items would start to get warm. Also, I’ve always LOVED your blog and I’m excited to see more food/ ingredient/ meal planning related posts in the future!

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Lindsey     at 8:14 am

That is awesome to spend that much. My husband thinks our grocery bills are too high $500-600/month for us two, which is on the higher side but we rarely eat out and nothing goes to waste so I do not worry about it too much.

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tamara     at 8:14 am

gosh…my hubby and I spend nearly $1000/month on food(including cleaning supplies, paper towels, ec). Granted, we do eat only grass-fed, organic meats and organic vegetables, but even when we experimented with vegetarian/vegan diets we still spent nearly that much with all the extra vegetables, tofu and other stuff we needed to not starve to death.

Of course, we spend less than $100/month on eating out because we almost NEVER eat out(not many places have organic meats and I basically won’t eat CAFO raised meats) so it probably balances out somewhat.

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Leah Reply:

Our average for the two of us is $125. We mostly eat at home but for hubby’s lunch and breakfast he eats at work (it’s subsidized). I take my own lunches to work.

We only buy organic and our meat is all from ‘happy meat’ places. Local if we can. Fish from only sustainable sources.

I’ve ate this way my entire life. I’ve also had a veggie garden my whole life. I volunteer at a farm.

So to me the $125 or so each week is 1000% worth it. We’re healthier for it.

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Emily Malone Reply:

Well we don’t buy any meat, cheese, fish, or alcohol – which are probably some of the most expensive grocery items!

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amy     at 8:18 am

Actually, I love this kind of post. I have been thinking about requesting one. As much as I love the recipes, it really helps to see how others plan and then carry thru to cooking. I understand that you are back in full phase on cooking, but we appreciate any pictures of the little cutie.

My daughters and I have learned so much from your blog and others. I’m interested in a post or blog that is geared towards single young men feeding themselves as healthy as possible. My son cooks, but needs “help”. I’m sure he would just like me to summarize all the ones I read.

Good Luck on the move. I hope the new place has as nice a walking area as the lake that you all walk around.
A

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Emily Malone Reply:

Shoot, I don’t know anything about single men, haha. :) But I will do my best to talk more about meal planning and cooking ideas! I can still get to the lake from my new house! :)

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Holly     at 8:19 am

I spend $250-275 CAD/month on food for just me – I’m a gluten-free vegetarian that doesn’t eat at restaurants…I always thought my food costs were low (especially compared to those that eat regular lunches and dinners out)…but now I’m thinking I’m a pig!!!

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Emily Malone Reply:

I don’t think you are a pig. :) One person still needs all the same condiments, oils, pantry items, cleaners, etc as two!

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Rianne     at 8:22 am

I love this post! I’m the opposite, I’m the girl looking into everyone’s cart at the grocery store. I love knowing what foods, products, etc. others enjoy. My husband I usually spend about $450-500 on groceries a month, but we’re in NYC where everything is crazy expensive. We also spend about $400 on meals out each month because we LOVE to eat out here. I also love the shopping but hate carrying it home and putting it away. I also love seeing a full fridge and pantry! Good luck with your move!

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Emily Malone Reply:

If I lived in NYC I’d spend that much eating out too! We actually eat out for dinners quite a bit her e – the food in Seattle is amazing as well. I should keep track next month and see how it really adds up – I bet it’s more than I think.

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Rianne Reply:

My husband and I miss the wonderful Seattle food! I found that keeping track has really helped us a lot. I use Mint.com for all my budgeting. Kath did a post about it awhile back and I’ve been using it ever since! You can set budgets and see all your finances in one place. I have a separate grocery and restaurant budget each month and it’s been really helpful. PS – I’m an Almond Breeze girl all the way! I feel like the Silk brand tastes…funny.

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Shay @ Whine Less, Breathe More     at 8:23 am

I like grocery shopping, if I have a plan for the food in mind. I also don’t like putting the groceries away, but it’s now my girls job.

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Katie @ Serenity in the Storm     at 8:25 am

Great post. Thanks! It seems like you’re doing great on the montly food costs for Seattle. We buy food for 2 adults and one vegan dog (she eats a homecooked whole foods diet) and we’re in Seattle as well. We spend around $400-450 on food each week and try to buy as much organic as possible, but we divide up where we buy to maximize the cost effectiveness–for instance, a combination of Costco, PCC, vegetable stand, and sometimes Red Apple.

What part of Seattle are you moving to?

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Emily Malone Reply:

I used to make our dog food too, but it got to be too much work once Cullen arrived, and we switched back to (vegetarian) dried food. So dog food is not part of that budget. I love PCC, but I have actually found the best organic prices at Fred Meyer of all places. We are moving to Kirkland – excited about the house, but nervous about transitioning to the Eastside. I am so in love with living right in the heart of the city! Luckily it will only be about 20 minutes away. :)

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Jaime D Reply:

You will LOVE Kirkland! I was born and raised in Bellevue and now live in Issaquah and Kirkland has always been one of my favorite places to hang out! Being right by the water is so ideal and there is always so much going on in the Spring and Summer months!

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Amateur Mommy     at 8:25 am

I laughed at your mention of the lsdy w/ the Sunny D and Marie C. meals… I saw an obese family last week buying Mountain Dew, bacon, and frozen meals and I had to control my facial expression.

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Jen Reply:

Ugh, I hate comments like this! It’s just so judgmental, and you never know the whole story of someone’s life or circumstances. I often shop at smaller merchants for many of the foods we eat – greengrocers for produce, butcher for meat, bakery for bread, etc. so when I go to the actual grocery store, my cart may contain ice cream, soda and chips. Is it the sum total of my eating? Heck no! Will I be eating it all myself? No way! The ice cream goes in the freezer to side with pie for a dinner party later in the week – it will feed 10 people, and there will be leftovers. The soda will last for a month, and the chips will be eaten a measured portion at a time alongside my sandwich of turkey, avocado, sprouts and tomato on grain bread throughout the week.

Maybe that’s all that family eats, and maybe it isn’t. Maybe they’re stocking a freezer for an elderly relative who doesn’t/can’t cook for themselves (I used to do this for my grandpa when he was 91 and couldn’t get enough Twinkies – you should have seen me at the check-out with 6 boxes), or maybe they’re not – maybe they really are planning to eat nothing but frozen meals, bacon and pop. Guess what, though? It’s none of your business!

As someone who used to be overweight, I hate when people make snap judgments like this. I ate bacon almost everyday when I was losing weight – one slice at breakfast, and occasionally a slice crumbled into a salad or over a baked potato. Yup – ONE slice. Just because I bought a pack of bacon didn’t mean I was planning to eat the whole thing for a snack. And just because you saw an “obese family” buying what you consider crap doesn’t mean they won’t be eating it all at once, or exclusively, either.

Long after I started working to better myself, I still looked like a fat person. I spent 3 hours walking the seawall one morning, then treated myself to a small yogurt cone (240 calories). I got a comment about how I shouldn’t be eating ice cream from some idiot who was sat on a beach chair. He made a judgment without knowing the facts – he just saw a fat girl eating ice cream, not a fat girl who had just busted her a** exercising, had recently lost 23 pounds, and who was eating calories that were planned and allowed for as a treat. If reading this, any part of you thinks that this was somehow different than your thoughts in that parking lot, think again. It’s no different at all. The only thing I can respect is that you held your tongue – though having to “fight” to contain your face is almost as bad.

Honestly, the world would be a much better place if people spent nearly as much time focusing on themselves and their own behaviors as they did on those of others.

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Jessica Reply:

Honestly, the world would be a much better place if people spent nearly as much time focusing on themselves and their own behaviors as they did on those of others..

That post of yours took a bit of time to write, eh? She made a valid point. You, however, went a bit overboard.

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Brooke Reply:

She obviously felt passionate about it and articulated herself very well. How is her point not valid? You just made her point actually.

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Jessica Reply:

Did I say her point wasn’t valid? No. I said Amateur Mommy made a valid point. That doesn’t mean Jen’s point is not valid. I quoted Jen’s: “Honestly, the world would be a much better place if people spent nearly as much time focusing on themselves and their own behaviors as they did on those of others..”
as having taken a lot of time to write. Is there anything wrong with that, Brooke?

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Jen Reply:

No, but you’d be mistaken :) It didn’t take more than a couple of minutes, and to me the time is well spent if it perhaps causes someone to catch themselves and consider they’re only seeing one piece of the puzzle next time they rush to judgment.

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Jessica Reply:

You’re right. Whether you are eating kale salads or drinking Mountain Dew, people are all people. We all have our strengths, weaknesses, flaws and sore subject areas.

MJ Reply:

I have to say that I disagree with this comment. Although you make some valid points and I do think we all tend to be naturally judgemental when we see obese people at grocery stores. I admit that I automatically assume they don’t eat well, b/c more often than not they don’t.
Although I have been blessed with good genetics and a fast metabolism, I also make sure to eat healthy b/c I think it’s important. It’s not about being skinny, it’s about being healthy.
I understand it may come easier for me than some, but I also make it a priority to eat right and a lot of obese individuals do not. They use the “it’s too expensive and inconvenient” excuse more often than not. I eat healthy 95% of the time and I can assure you that I spend a lot less money on groceries than your average person. Beans, fruits, veggies and rice cost way less than TV dinners and fruit pies. These are excuses for laziness in my opinion.
Just today an [overweight] co-worker of mine was telling me how it’s so unfair that I’m so thin. Then later I overheard her telling another co-worker that she opened the fridge last night and didnt want to make anything so she ordered a pizza. If we all made our health a priority than I think the world would be a better place.

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Amateur Mommy Reply:

My intent wasn’t to tick anyone off. I could stand to lose a few pounds! It was just an observation– there was nothing but crap on the conveyer belt, and they had two very young children with them. Both parents were morbidly obese and my observations made me cringe a little. I hope that they can make some healthy changes for themselves and their family. My whole family is obese, so really, you are preaching to the choir. I make better food choices b/c I want better for my family than the role models that I had growing up. So, I stand by my statement. Consuming bacon and mountain dew, particularly when you appear to be at a rather unhealthy juncture in your life, is a bad choice, IMO.

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Emily Malone Reply:

Honestly I was more just amazed at the AMOUNT of Sunny D! Sooo many gallons! I wondered if she was having a party or a church function or something. No way one person can drink that much orange stuff.

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Jen Reply:

Just to clarify – I didn’t have any issue with your comment in your post, Emily. It didn’t seem to make a judgment either way, I just took it as an observation and curiosity.

With the comment above, it was the combination of “obese” with the breakdown of the foods (including OMG! bacon – which many, many people buy each week), and the fight to control her shock over it all that did it.

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Jessica Reply:

I would be shocked too, especially when kids are involved.

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ashley rebekah     at 8:25 am

for a family of four (my husband, myself, and 2+ year old twins) we spend about $600-$800 per month on groceries and household items like cleaners, paper products, etc. i think $300-$400 for a family of three is pretty reasonable. love your approach to conventional versus organic. i try to use the ‘dirty dozen’ guidelines as much as possible, but it can get daunting and pricey.

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Cait     at 8:27 am

Grocery shopping is definitely one of life’s simple pleasures for me! It is so refreshing to open the refrigerator and pantry and know that you will be able to put together something that tastes good and is good for you, too!

I am impressed with the amount of food that you buy (especially organics) and the overall cost. I am a college student on a college budget, so this is definitely an area that I am constantly working on! It’s tough… I sometimes spend $80 for seven days worth of food just for myself! Yikes! Are there particular organic items that are consistently reasonably priced? Or do you just keep an eye out for sales?

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Emily Malone Reply:

At my particular store, I can get really good, cheap organic greens – that’s what I usually stock up on! Kale, collards, etc. (organic) are $1.99 a bunch, which is a steal. I can also get huge tubs of spinach and salad greens for $4.99. I just shop around to find the best prices I can!

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Jessica Reply:

Fred Meyer is pretty awesome. One of the most awesome parts of Seattle supermarkets is the produce section. The PNW has wonderfully large produce departments with wonderfully ripe, large fruits and veggies. It is hard to shop on the east coast after having this luxury! :)

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Marty Reply:

Organic collards here are $1.49/bunch (fairly small) and the chard and Kale are $2.79/bunch with a plastic container of organic spinach $5.99/container! I can’t wait for the farmers market! Organic apples are norm $2.29-$2.49/lb and on sale $1.79-$1.99. A bunch of organic celery $3.99. Bananas .89/lb, organics .99/lb. We only go out to eat 1-2x/year, though of we could afford it I would atleast 1xweek. I’m vegan and gluten-free, my husband not GF, and an omni, tho he’ll eat anything I cook, and I rarely cook him meat. It’s getting harder and harder to. Tho I’d love him to stop he’s a hunter boy from Idaho, and all his family eats meat at every meal, breakfast included. He amazingly enough, is trying to change them when he visits!

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Sarah @ The Strength of Faith     at 8:30 am

$100/week sounds about normal to me. That is what my husband and I aim for – I’m sure if I was really good with coupons and sales I could get it down, but for right now that works for us.

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Willow @ My Own Trail     at 8:35 am

Grocery shopping is my favorite form of shopping! Actually it’s one of my favorite overall activities. When we go on vacation, I scope out the exciting natural food stores and plan my trip around shopping at them. If there’s a Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s I’m even more excited since we don’t have either of those where I live.

I typically spend about $600 – $650 a month on groceries for a family of four.

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April     at 8:35 am

Hi Emily!
Have you ever thought of making your own Almond Milk? I use to buy SO much of it and it got pricey, but once i started making my own i can’t go back, it taste SO much better:= Just thought i would ask:)
Love this post BTW!

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Emily Malone Reply:

I have thought about it, but honestly for me that’s one of those “not really worth it” things. Almonds here are not cheap, and I think it would add up to cost a lot more. I think some things are worth letting others do the grunt work! :)

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elizabeth Reply:

I find it so much more delicious than Almond Breeze. Almonds are a good deal at Costco. I’ve been making almond milk for a couple months and love it. I use 3/4 c almonds soaked overnight, then blended in vitamix with 4c water and a pinch of salt. Then strain through a nut milk bag, $7, and add vanilla and stevia. Give it a try sometime.

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Morgan Reply:

April how do you make Almond milk? I’m addicted to it and would love to try it myself!

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Robyn (GirlonRaw) Reply:

Really easy. Blend 1 cup of soaked almonds with 2-5 cups of water. I like 3 cups. Then drain through cheesecloth or a stocking (clean of course) or a sprouting bag. Then you have rich creamy almond milk. I usually make nut protein balls out of the nut pulp afterwards but if you don’t wish to do anything with it straight away, then you can freeze the pulp till later.

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Marty Reply:

I’ve made almond milk too, but almonds are expensive here and not organic. I never strained the pulp because I was lazy and actually liked the extra fiber! I end up drinking almond or coconut milk, and sometimes splurge on hemp milk when it’s in sale.

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April Reply:

I just throw one cup of raw almonds with 4 cups water into my vitamix and blend on high for a few minutes. I add dashes of cinnamon and vanilla extract. Once blended really good just pour it through a strainer and “wah lah” you have almond milk. So easy! It makes enough to last me a week:-

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Stephanie Reply:

Morgan,

I make my almond milk by soaking 1 cup of almonds overnight (softens them up and makes them a little easier to blend as well as sprouts them if they are raw).

In a blender, blend:
1 cup almonds, soaked
4 cups water

Blend on high for 2 minutes. Then strain in nut milk bag. Then back in the blender and add a couple dates (or another sweetener), a pinch of salt, and maybe a tsp of vanilla if you would like. You will need a high speed blender like a vitamix most likely. Normal blenders just can’t blend the almonds small enough :-)

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Morgan Feld     at 8:37 am

I am always trying to be greener with housing supplies too- I’ve noticed it has made cough far less while cleaning. Some tips I got and loved:

Vinegar & Water instead of glass cleaner- just put it in an old spray bottle, and it has far fewer streaks than windex. I also use it as an all-purpose counter cleaner.

Baking Soda & Distilled White Vinegar instead of draino in the shower. I live with four women, and this worked far better than draino for us. Just pour the baking soda in, then vinegar, watch it fizz & repeat!

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Emily Malone Reply:

Love the Drano tip – I’m going to try that!! I’m going through the whole postpartum hair loss thing (so gross!) and it is KILLING our drain.

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April Reply:

OMG so am I with the hair, so sad:(. But something tells me no one will notice on you as your hair is gorgeous!!! You have so much!

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Marty Reply:

You can buy at Fred Meyer in the bathroom supply section a great fine strainer for drains. I replaced our bathroom sink and tub/shower and kitchen sinks with them. Easy to lift and whap on the tub or sinks to dislodge the hair that collects in them. I’ve even given them as a gift!

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Brooke Reply:

I got a similar tip about this on pinterest. Pour the baking soda then chase it with boiling water. It really cleared our drains!

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Anne Reply:

We do it once in a while here also, it’s perfect, you’ll never need drano again !

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Anne Reply:

I mean vinegar+baking soda+wait 5 min and put boiling water.

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Maryea @ Happy Healthy Mama     at 8:39 am

Wow we spend about twice as much as you do on groceries! We do have a 3 year old to feed in addition to my husband and me, but she doesnt eat that much! Does that amount include what you spend on take out/eating out? I’m starting to wonder what I’m doing wrong!

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Emily Malone Reply:

No no that’s just groceries. Takeout/coffee/etc is a whole other budget, and I have no idea what that number looks like. Probably higher than I’d like to admit.

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Susan     at 8:41 am

Great grocery haul! As to your love for orange juice (I grew up drinking OJ with breakfast every day and have a love for it, too!), I’d highly recommend squeezing your own. (Or buy regular OJ and cut it with water yourself; did you see that the major ingredient in Trop50 is water — no wonder it has fewer calories and sugar than regular OJ!)

I recently read an intriguing book about the orange juice industry (and posted about it here: http://www.alessprocessedlife.com/2012/01/whats-for-breakfast-freshly-squeezed.html) — interestingly, orange juice isn’t as simple as “take orange, squeeze it, voila, orange juice!”

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Emily Malone Reply:

We have a juicer and we make OJ in it occasionally, but for me that kind of falls under the “not worth it” category. Some things are just easier to buy! I don’t get Trop50 each week – usually just whatever is not from concentrate, and has the best sale price.

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Susan Reply:

Yeah, we don’t have a juicer, so in the past I’ve made fresh orange juice by hand — it’s definitely not the most convenient thing to do! Also, as it turns out, the “from concentrate” stuff is actually more like fresh-squeezed than the “not from concentrate” kind, since the FC stuff is frozen instantly and heated only once before being packaged and the NFC has to be deoxygenated for long-term storage (thus removing all the flavor), and the flavor is added back in later in the process. Sorry to go on and on about OJ — for some reason, I just find the topic to be completely fascinating! : )

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Emily Malone Reply:

Interesting! I haven’t thought that much about our OJ – I just watch out for aspartame/Splenda since I definitely avoid those these days.

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Jaime Reply:

While we are on the subject of OJ, I have to chime in to point out the TOTAL RIP-OFF that is Trop50!!! It is NOT 100% juice, it is 100% juice that they dilute in water….you are paying MORE for LESS juice!! No matter what the price is, it is never ever a better deal than the regular OJ.

I dont know why people are so anti-concentrate. All it means is that they removed the water. Thats it. (you can find healthy ones that dont add sugar) Its actually closer to fresh OJ than the “not from concentrate” crap that sits in huge vats for weeks and months before it is put in cartons and made to look better and healthier and then they slap on a premium price tag and suckers buy it up. Look up how this supposed “premium OJ” is made…it will shock you….

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Anna @ On Anna's Plate     at 8:48 am

Ahhhh, SO excited to have kombucha back in my life now that our baby is here! I cut it out during pregnancy just because you never know (it seemed strange to drink a big strain of bacteria with a baby inside, ya know? :-)), but now I’m ready for a trilogy!!

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Emily Malone Reply:

I cut it out during pregnancy too! LOVE having it back!

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Sally Mae Reply:

I actually just tried Kombucha for the first time today and I’m nursing a 4 month old. I sort of just thought it was tea, but then after I drank it I realized that maybe it’s not safe to drink while nursing. I got a little paranoid, but I’m sure it’s fine. :)

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Emily Malone Reply:

I drink a ton of it and I’m nursing too! I figure other people drink wine, so kombucha has to be okay, right?

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Alison     at 8:51 am

I definitely love grocery shopping! But I hear you – lugging it all into the house isn’t my favourite. It’s a bit of a trek from our car to the kitchen, so it’s definitely a process.

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Angie     at 8:54 am

I think the discussion of what people spend on groceries and where they live is so interesting!

We live in the Midwest, and shoot for about $300 month for 2 adults and 1 toddler. I tend to shop at the cheapest place possible (Aldi) and don’t do organic (though we’re trying to make the switch and see what the cost is). I have the same problem you described- it’s so hard for me to put more money into the grocery budget when I can find the “same” food cheaper somewhere else. But you’re right, it’s NOT the same- must remember that!

We recently started fostering three teenage boys, and we’ve upped our budget to $400/month for all of us and it seems possible. I might have to make it $450, because man do they eat a lot!

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Emily Malone Reply:

That is awesome that you are fostering the boys!! I can only imagine how much they eat, haha.

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Sara     at 8:57 am

I really love grocery shopping so it was fun to go virtually with you :) I really enjoyed hearing about your strategy and am looking forward to posts on menu planning too.

We probably spend around $500/month for two people. We do buy all organic, but are mostly vegan and try to use the bulk section whenever possible, which reduces the cost some. I’m always looking for ways to cut this back some. I think $300-$400 w/ a baby is inspiring!

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Emily Malone Reply:

We buy all our pantry stuff in bulk too – saves a TON of money!

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Shady     at 8:58 am

I’m so judgemental at the grocery store. It’s a terrible thing but when I see a mom with two young kids checking out with $150 worth of processed, sugary, chemical laden food and nary a vegetable or fruit in sight, I get so angry. I’m also super amused/kind of sad when the people checking me out have no idea what kale or brussel sprouts in my cart are. Really peeps?!

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Emily Malone Reply:

I get what you’re saying. And I’m not condoning buying crap for your kids. But I also know what it feels like to be tired, stressed, and really overwhelmed – and that’s just with one kid that I get to stay home with! I imagine that for many families with two parents working (out of the house), and perhaps a lower budget, the idea of buying everything fresh and unprocessed can just not feel possible. Of course a cart full of sugar isn’t okay either, but I think it’s okay to find a realistic middle point. I also wonder if a lot of these moms actually have ANY idea how bad that food really is for their kids. Nutrition education goes a long way. I always have to tell my cashier what the kale is too. :)

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Jen Reply:

Thanks for this Emily (and sorry to hijack the comments with my long diatribe above). Your compassion and understanding is great. I think most people do the best they can with what they have/what they know. No one wants to see kids eating crap, but shaming the parents isn’t the right way to bring about a change – the same way that shaming overweight people by mocking their choices isn’t right, either.

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Emily Malone Reply:

Diatribes are allowed! That’s what I love about open comment sections – a wide variety of opinions to share and learn from. Your ice cream story made me so sad. I think that’s part of what I was trying to say too – you just never know the whole story. And I imagine that shame often just reinforces the behavior that may cause someone to overeat in the first place. I worry a lot about what I eat, and what my family eats, but that’s as far as it goes. To each his own.

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Jillian Reply:

I agree :) I started working in the health food/supplement industry as a teenager in the early 90′s, before the industry really blew up, and I’m amazed at how many people have taken the concept of healthy food and turned it into yet another excuse for snobbery. Acting disgusted or as though someone is inferior or less intelligent because of what is in their cart is the antithesis of *genuinely* caring about the wellbeing of other humans. Personally, I would rather have friends who were warm hearted, genuine and compassionate while eating frozen waffles and pie all day than people who get uppity about their vegetables. :P Also, I work with people who have health issues and are seeking out alternative therapies and supplements, and it’s definitely caused me to have way more compassion and understanding for people in general. I admit to being a snobby vegan back when I first got involved in the whole healthy living concept, and I probably did think that not eating meat automatically made me healthier (ironically, it didn’t) and better than other people, but I was a kid. I just wish people would stop pretending they care about other people’s health when it’s really an elitist thing.

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Shady Reply:

OK, I need to hop on here and defend myself. I am neither elitist nor a snob. I also do not shame people. My thoughts are just that, thoughts. I have never voiced what I think to anyone. Except for in this forum. I know they aren’t right and that’s why I don’t put them out there. But I do believe that helping people understand how their decisions about food can affect their health – if they ask for it – can be a sign of caring. I also have to point out that judgement about food works both ways. Upon revealing myself as a longtime vegetarian and short-time vegan, I’ve had many people respond with surprise and aggression, to the point that one woman told me I’d never be able to have children because of the ‘abuse’ I was doing to my body. And I am by no means perfect (in any part of my life). I may not eat animal products at this point in my life but I do love to bake and I drink alcohol.

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Jillian Reply:

Hi Shady-
I actually wasn’t responding directly to your comment, but I had read the exchange above and scrolled down and saw Emily’s response. I wasn’t calling you a snob or an elitist, personally- the whole habit of judging people based on the fact that they don’t eat “health food” is so ubiquitous at this point.. I see all the time in my work, and it’s grown to strike me as ironic in the fact that the people who express that sort of attitude seem to actually believe they are better somehow because of what they consume, while simultaneously claiming that their attitudes are related to caring about other people. I think it’s refereshing that Emily doesn’t behave that way, but when I first became aware of “healthy living blogs”, I think just about every one I initially read seemed to exude that sort of elitist attitude – whether they were vegetarian/vegan or not- and that’s what this one is the only one I read anymore. Personally, I don’t inherently equate being vegan/vegetarian with optimal health because of my experiences- I’ve seen many unhealthy vegans and was one myself at the end of an 8 year run (despite taking B-12 supplements religiously and eating the closest I could get to a perfect vegan diet, I ended up with nerve damage and other severe health issues)…that might be a good example of why I’m sensitive to the judging thing- I thought I was going to be healthy because of my “perfect” choices, and I ended up very much the opposite. It was very upsetting to me, but ultimately humbling. My point is that our diets can have a bad effect on our health even if we have good intentions. Also, people can eat junk food and leave normal and healthy lives- I think we’ve all seen that. I honestly just believe that one’s attitude about life is the most important aspect of good health, and I really don’t believe that people who routinely judge other people’s appearance and diets do so because they actually care about them.

Jillian Reply:

er, that was supposed to say “lead” normal healthy lives, not leave ;)

Shady Reply:

Thanks for taking the time to come on and clarify. While I don’t agree with all you said, I understand and respect your point of view. However, I think your argument may hold more weight if you avoid using such judgemental sounding language. P.S. I’m replying to this comment because there’s no option to reply to your other one.

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Missy G.     at 8:59 am

I am totally one of those people that tries to analyze other people’s carts, and wonders if others do the same to me. Especially at Sam’s because you can see what people enjoy so much that they buy in bulk. Like the very obese couple with 2 (!!) big plastic containers of cheese poofs. No lie.

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Jen Reply:

Yes, because thin people NEVER buy 2 (!!!) big containers of cheese puffs! (roll eyes)

Seriously?

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Missy G. Reply:

I didn’t say that I was a good person for looking in other people’s carts. But thank you for throwing stones at me. It must be awesome being perfect.

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Brooke Reply:

She’s simply pointing out that you automatically associated bad food with obese people. If you want to comment, by all means, do! Just try to be kind about it.

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Jen Reply:

So far from perfect I wouldn’t even be able to see perfect with binoculars! :) No stones, just a comment against the (IMO, needless) inclusion that the people buying cheese puffs (two whole containers at that!) were also “obese”. Curious why you felt it was necessary to include that, when you could have just said “Like a couple with two big containers of cheese puffs”? One is an observation, one is an observation clouded with judgment.

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Missy G. Reply:

Ok, first, I want to apologize to Jen for my snappy comment above. This has been wearing on my heart all weekend long. I was having a terrible day at work on Friday, and I let my bad attitude cross over to here. I’m truly sorry for offending you.

Regarding my first comment, I did not mean to come across so rude, but I now see how judgmental and wrong I was. I suppose that I termed them as “obese” because I assume that anyone else would make that observation also. I’m truly not trying to be insensitive, but both were very overweight. And as I said above, I have a tendency to stare into everyone’s carts, especially at Sam’s Club, where everything sold comes in bulk. Obviously, this didn’t come across with my simple statement above, but their cart was filled with processed, carb-laden products, not exclusive to the two 5-gallon containers of cheese puffs.

To be completely honest, my 5-second thought process went something like: Woah, that’s a lot of unhealthy foods; Why do they eat those kind of foods?; Maybe they don’t know how tasty healthier foods can be?; (again) I wonder if they see what’s in my cart; I wish I could help them shop for healthier foods…

Anyway, I’m going to stop now. I’m probably just digging myself deeper into my hole.

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Sara     at 9:00 am

I LOVE meal planning, list making and grocery shopping. Putting it all away is the worst, but taking time to plan meals each week and shop accordingly definitely pays big later. :) It’s part of my weekly routine! I get excited knowing that I have a new or favorite dish to make every night for dinner.

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Leah     at 9:05 am

I love this topic. Sometimes I enjoy grocery shopping (Wegman’s, Trader Joe’s–there’s a reason they were voted the best grocery stores in the US). :) Thanks for posting, Emily!

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MJ     at 9:09 am

Hi Emily!
I have been following your blog for awhile but have never commented.
After this post I decided to comment by saying thank you. I feel like so many bloggers try to be superwoman/man and aren’t realistic. Your posts are always honest and real and I love it. Like you said, eating organic and making everything homemade(protein bars etc.) ALL of the time would be wonderful but it’s not always realistic for busy folks.
And your continued scrutiny about eating tofu. PISH-POSH. It’s all about moderation and you are allowed to eat tofu whenever and wherever you want! If we went by what “they” say in reports etc. we wouldn’t be “allowed” to eat anything. And who are “they” anyway?!
Kudos to you and your health and beautiful family. I became vegan last December and have thoroughly enjoyed reading your posts!
Cheers!

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Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks MJ! :) I try to keep things realistic and honest. I am definitely not a supermom, but I’m doing my best. The tofu stuff has just gotten really old. Eat it or don’t – it’s not that big of a deal!

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Leah Reply:

agreed!

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MJ Reply:

I concur! and you’re welcome! I’m just a state (I-duh-ho) away from Washington! We should get together and eat tofu…lots of it. :)

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Marty Reply:

I love tofu, and will continue to buy only organic tho (no GMOs here). And we do drink organic soy milk too.

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Natasha     at 9:13 am

I love a well-stocked fridge and pantry! Can’t wait to see what you do with those wonton wrappers :)

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Leah     at 9:15 am

P.S. Trop50. Not a good choice. :(

Here’s why:

http://www.snack-girl.com/snack/trop50-lemonade-review/

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Emily Malone Reply:

Hmm not sure I completely agree with that review. I don’t use a ton of stevia, but I do like it as a natural sweetener. I also don’t buy Trop50 every week – that’s just what was on sale this week. :)

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Leah Reply:

Yeah, I was just wondering what you thought. I mean, Stevia from the plant is great! But some stevia products actually take 40 chemical compounds to create (like Truvia) and the FDA does not require they are listed on the package. Thanks for your reply, Emily. I just have to avoid all fake sugar (doctor’s orders–they are a headache inducer for me). Although Stevia comes from a natural source, like anything, right from the plant is best (or the hive in the case of raw honey). Tropicana is owned by Coke and they invented Truvia, after all. Just something to think about. :)

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Marty Reply:

I use NuNaturals plain liquid stevia, as I was using way too much honey in my tea and had systemic candida. I also found out I was allergic to honey! Whaaa! It too me a month to get used to stevia, now I love it and actually have a huge plant I bought at our farmers market two summers ago I’ve wintered over successfully. I eat the leaves when I needing a sweet. I’ve dried the leaves but not used them in baking yet.

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Whitney @ Whit Likes Fit     at 9:26 am

Love this post! I also love grocery shopping. I think I prefer it over clothes shopping hahah. I’m super impressed with that amount with a baby. We go to the grocery store once a week and spend about $75-80 which includes cleaners/beauty (body wash etc) and then we usually do a once a month costco run for around $100-200. My husband thinks we spend way too much, especially since we’ve started buying organic but I’ve talked with some of my girlfriends and I think we’re average to low in comparison.

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Emily Malone Reply:

That’s pretty much what we do too – one big trip and a few smaller trips.

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Katy     at 9:26 am

I absolutely love grocery shopping. It’s such a good feeling seeing a fully stocked fridge that is filled with fresh produce. It can make even crappy week feel good :) Thanks for sharing!

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Emily Malone Reply:

Totally agree!

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Amanda     at 9:37 am

Your grocery haul looks a lot like mine, minus the baby stuff. :) I love grocery shopping and could spend hours browsing at stores like Whole Foods.

I know you’re short on time, but I recently posted a kombucha tutorial on how to grow your own scoby so you can make your own! I’m enjoying my first batch this week and it’s awesome! Definitely going to save me a lot of money over time and the process is really simple (just a lot of waiting around for it to ferment).

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Laine     at 9:54 am

I love grocery shopping, although recently I’ve tried to cut back (I shop at Whole Foods so the impulse to buy expensive stuff is huge.) I buy part of a grass-fed cow every year for meat, and get organic/local veggies delivered every week. I get eggs from a farm down the street. If I could find a milk/cheese/butter delivery place I’d never have to leave the house! I also get my cleaning supplies and some pantry stuff (and cat food) from Amazon’s Subscribe and Save program.

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Emily Malone Reply:

I LOVE AMAZON! :)

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Morgan     at 10:11 am

I also absolutely love grocery shopping and actually think it’s beneficial (for me at least) to do the grocery shopping with a baby. I make far less (if any) impulse buys because I’m trying to hurry through my list or caring for my daughter while grabbing what I need. As for a budget, I think you’re right on track! For a family of 4 plus an infant, who also buys mostly organic/green products, our budget is $600 a month.

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Amber @ Busy, Bold, Blessed     at 10:11 am

Love this post! And looking forward to more like it. Not that I don’t love the pics of your little helper ;)

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Belle     at 10:15 am

Have you looked into Amazon Fresh? Prices are higher but it’s worth it to me not to have to lug groceries home! We get our groceries delivered on Tuesday morning before 6 am – we just have to open our balcony door and unload! Also, Top Banana here in Ballard has incredibly cheap produce. I got a big bag of fruits and veggies the other day for $12! It’s not all local but I imagine there will be more local stuff available in the summer months!

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Emily Malone Reply:

I have actually! I’m also considering signing up for a CSA from New Roots for this summer. I’ve never heard of Top Banana – do they organics too?? I want to check it out! Seattle also has a grocery delivery called SPUD I’m considering trying – they have regular grocery items as well as local stuff (like Flying Apron cookies!).

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Belle Reply:

My neighbor has a CSA from New Roots and they love it! Top Banana does have organic produce, just not a ton I think. Again the selection will probably be better once it gets warmer. Maybe worth checking out anyway, they’re at 65th and 15th. :) Ooooh, I’ve never heard of SPUD… for what it’s worth Amazon sells local items too, but you probably already knew that!

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Gina Reply:

I did New Roots for over a year. It’s a great service and super convenient because they deliver to your door. You can even sub out food or purchase extra online beforehand. The main reason I canceled mine is because it was hard to manage the empty bins in my teeny apartment!

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Jen Reply:

OK, it’s ridiculous how much time I’m spending here today! :D But, I just wanted to throw out a recommendation for SPUD! We have SPUD here in Vancouver, and I’ve used the service for a long time (mainly just the summer months) and don’t have a single complaint – the service has been fantastic and the produce is great quality. I like that I can go online to see the box contents for the upcoming week and make adjustments to the amounts, or substitute if there’s something I’d rather not have.

And, with that, I promise to stop commenting for today! ;)

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Liz Reply:

I, for one, loved reading your comments today, Jen, and totally agree about the judgments people are throwing out there :)

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Lena Reply:

I am in the Seattle area and received my first order of produce from New Roots on Friday. I must say I was very impressed. Everything in the box was very fresh and I believe everything was organic. A friend of mine recommended Full Circle but after looking over the reviews on-line I ended up going with New Roots. At this stage I’m starting off with an order every other week as I hope to start going to some local farmers markets in May. I haven’t been very happy with the produce at my local supermarkets. I hope this helps :)

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Emily Malone Reply:

So happy to hear this! I’m planning to sign up once we have moved and settled!

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j3nn     at 10:21 am

OMG, I’m the same way! I love, love, love grocery shopping but dread bringing it all into the house and putting it away. Thankfully hubby carries most of it in, but the challenge is finding room for everything, lol. But yeah, once it’s done, it feels good to be restocked.

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Katy @ MonsterProof     at 10:33 am

Our weekly budget probably averages out to around $100 for everything (2 adults and a 10 month old). We eat at home probably at least the same 90%, but we do eat meat that adds to the expense (which, I want to drop for myself again once I quit breastfeeding, but my husband won’t). I love grocery shopping, and my son does, too, though he now is WAY too good at grabbing things off shelves.

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katie     at 10:40 am

Emily–You will have to tell me how your diapers work out overnight. We cloth during the day, and use disposable at night. We are about to run out of the huge stash of diapers we got through baby showers and I need to buy some for overnight. Of course I’d like to get some chemical free ones BUT our girl pees A.LOT. and if I can avoid the disposable specialty overnight ones I would like that.

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Julie (A Case of the Runs)     at 11:17 am

Looking forward to more food posts! And don’t feel like you need to justify your grocery budget — it doesn’t look that high considering you’re trying to get organic and green stuff. Those mushrooms can get expensive! My hauls aren’t exactly this healthy, and I think just for two, it’s about a hundred less than your lower range, due to sale hawking (we are lucky to live around lots of store choices), and no baby.

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Rachel     at 11:33 am

I tried to skim through to see if you already addressed this question, but reading all 125 comments was too much. Do you primarily shop at Trader Joe’s? We don’t have a Trader Joe’s near us and we are trying to find a good place to get organics. (Unfortunately it isn’t as easy as it should be to have access to organic foods)

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Cassie @ Back to Her Roots     at 11:37 am

Oh! I love this post! I want to see inside everyone’s grocery cart!

We have a grocery budget of $500 a month and I always ALWAYS go over, especially when I was posting 5-7 recipes on my blog a week, but now I’ve knocked it back to 3 a week and our grocery bill is happy about that. We’re down to between $350-$400 a month, and we never go out to eat, so that’s everything. About $100 of that per month goes to Amazon Subscribe and Save stuff (LOVE).

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lee     at 11:50 am

You know, my monthly budget (for 1.5 people, since my fiance and I don’t live together, but eat a lot of meals together) is around $250. So I think your monthly grocery budget sounds average and reasonable…especially since you a) make an effort to buy certain products organic and b) do so many meals at home. Kudos to you for being mindful and purposeful in your grocery shopping! =)

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Sarah Crosby     at 12:08 pm

Glad to know I am not the only one who loves to grocery shop. I find it to be a stress reliever. I also do love a good deal.

My husband, 5 mo old (who only eats oatmeal too) and I spend about $125 per week at the grocery store. We eat at home almost every meal except one maybe two. I love reading what people are spending and buying at the store.

I also love how you put things very realistically. We are not vegetarians but love eating good, whole, healthy foods, which is why I love reading your blog. You always put things in the perspective that this is what works for your family and not that it is the RIGHT way. Keep up the good work, yummy recipes, and cute pics of the kiddo ;)

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Angela @ Happy Fit Mama     at 12:31 pm

We spend about $100-$115 a week on groceries for a family of 4(2 adults and 2 toddlers). I don’t buy my cleaners or other tolietries there. Too expensive!

I buy organic milk,eggs, and yogurt(if I didn’t get them locally)and things that are on the ‘dirty dozen’ list. We also don’t a whole lot of meat but I’ll occassionally get organic chicken.

Our food bill has gone up tremendously since my twins started eating solids. I’ve got at least 20+ bananas in my cart alone! :)

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HealthySpiceofLife     at 1:19 pm

What a great post!!! Have you looked into getting your organic fruits/veggies from Full Circle Farm? They do home delivery all around Puget Sound area. I usually get my box during winter months and then pause for summer time when there are plenty of farmer’s markets in the area.

Hope all goes well with moving. I see you are crossing the bridge over to the Eastside – you will love it! Kirkland is great – right on the water. There is LOTS going on in Summer time. We live in Issaquah and love the Eastside.

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HealthySpiceofLife Reply:

Oh and forgot to mention about Bill Pace’s Fruit and Produce Stand in Bellevue. Now that you are on the Eastside, it may be more accessible to you. They send out a weekly email with all the Organic produce they have for the week along with the price – some really really great deals.
Their website is http://www.billpacefruitandproduce.com/.
Email them at billpacefruitandproduce@gmail.com to get on the weekly email list.

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Marty Reply:

Full Circle Farms even dies delivery 1xweek in Alaska. Now some local farmers are jumping onto the CSA cart, it’s great.

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Marty Reply:

…even DOES…actually I think it’s bi-monthly delivery not weekly…

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Maren     at 1:24 pm

Emily,
Thank you for this post. I was seriously going to write you an email asking ballpark how much you spend on monthly groceries. My husband, baby and I shoot for under $450 so way to go if you’re 300-400! You’ve inspired me to stick to the budget this month knowing it can be done! Now if only I could learn to like mushrooms…

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Maria     at 1:30 pm

Hi Emily!
I noticed that you buy natural all-purpose cleaner. I just wanted to let you on a secret for clean, natural, and economic cleaning in case you didn’t know. Use white vinegar! Yep, the good old plain stuff. Its a disinfectant, kills mold, bacteria, etc., and also leaves your counters shiny. If your turned off by the smell it goes away within a few minutes so your kitchen won’t smell like vinegar. I just buy the big gallon of vinegar and put it in a spray bottle. You can dilute it with a water if you want. Look into it!

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Jules Reply:

I just posted below about vinegar! Love it. Have you tried cleaning your drains with baking soda and vinegar?

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Maria Reply:

No I’ve never done that! I do use baking soda and vinegar to clean my produce though!

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Kelley     at 1:43 pm

I am a terrible meal planner and I really don’t like grocery shopping at all. Mostly because I’m not very creative in the kitchen and it stresses me out. My grocery trips are usually around $50/week, but I notice when I spend closer to $100 I get more meals and the food lasts me more than a week. (Go figure). I’m learning how to shop for meals instead of just ‘food’. I loved this post! Very helpful!

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crystal     at 1:48 pm

I am pretty much in love with Blue Diamond Almond coconut blen! I dont know how I have gotten along without it!

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Stellina @ My Yogurt Addiction     at 1:58 pm

I LOVE grocery shopping too! Every time I go to Whole Foods I feel like a kid in a candy store! I know what you mean about other peoples carts, sometimes I just want to go up to them and shake them! But instead, I just keep to myself!

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Stephanie @ LoveLaughterLight     at 1:59 pm

I was just talking to a friend last night about how much food I end up wasting because I’m a single girl without a plan! She was telling me that she, also single, found Corelle divided plates and uses a Seal A Meal to create her own TV dinners.

I also need to start planning better!

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Nancy     at 2:23 pm

Congrats on the house, can’t wait to hear/see more about it!

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Army Amy*     at 2:46 pm

I hate grocery shopping, but I love having a fully stocked fridge and pantry. Such a great feeling!*

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Kelly     at 3:37 pm

Will you do a post about cutting out dairy? I’d love to hear about it!

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Miranda @ Working Mom Works Out     at 3:56 pm

I enjoy your Cullen posts. Don’t stop mommy blogging altogether.

Also, my son used to call naval oranges “Belly-Button Oranges”

That is all :)

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Amateur Mommy Reply:

That’s hilarious! I love that! The things kids come up with :)

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Brittany (Healthy Slice of Life)     at 4:22 pm

Whew, I tried tackling a budget post today and angered a ton of people in the process. Basically, I’m taking on a challenge to feed our family for $100/week, but that includes all meals, no eating out and no using anything I have stored in the pantry, freezer, etc because that’s what allotted through via government assistance for food. I thought it was a cool concept, but it rubbed some people the wrong way.

I like seeing what your money buys you, though! How much do yall usually spend eating out? That’s always my downfall with budgeting.

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Lee     at 4:27 pm

I really enjoy grocery shopping but hate meal planning. That combination doesn’t really work out that well for me!

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katy     at 4:43 pm

I am so excited that you did this post. My husband and I recently (as in, just over a week ago) decided to (substantially) give up meat and dairy. I’ve been reading your blog for a long time, but now have been using it as a resource as we work on making our transition.

As a fellow Seattleite, I’m excited to try out a few of the local veggie restaurants you’ve reviewed too!

Thank you!!!

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marie     at 5:14 pm

My grocery budget isn’t too high, but my problem is that my restaurant spending is usually twice as much as my grocery spending. Also, I don’t have a car, so I do many small trips instead of a weekly trip and always end up buying things I shouldn’t.

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butternutrition     at 6:58 pm

Love your blog. You’re family is precious! Have you ever tried making your own kombucha? It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it ;)

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emily     at 7:41 pm

Hi Emily – are you going to do a post about cutting out dairy? Really curious!

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Heidi from BundlesofHugs     at 7:59 pm

Ohhh we buy a lot of the same stuff. I spend about that much too its so easy especially when you’re adding extras like cleaners and what not to the cart. I try hard to stick to the $100 dollar budget but its hard. Just wait till Cullen can reach and grab stuff off the shelves!

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Heidi from BundlesofHugs     at 8:02 pm

By the way you mention C is leaking at night in cloth diapers you might need to add a diaper doubler to the diaper or up the size at night. My son did the same thing at his age and I had no problems once I made some changes to his cloth diaper. Till this day my son has day time cloth diapers and an extra insert for night time.

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Maria     at 8:13 pm

FYI, our pediatrician told us we could skip the cereals and go straight to fruit and veggies. It is definitely not as messy, they like it more, and it does help lessen the breastfeeding just a little bit since you still have to mix cereal with breast milk (maybe that isn’t as important to you, but I work 3 days a week, so I feel a lot of pressure to pump a ton). Anyway, just so you know, you don’t have to start with cereals. :-)
P.S. I saw a sign recently on Facebook that said, ‘you know you are a mom when going to the grocery store by yourself feels like a vacation’–so true!

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Pam     at 8:20 pm

Great post Emily! I totally laughed at your fungi obsession, glad to know I wasn’t the only one who eats insane amounts of mushrooms. I just can’t get enough of them, and they’re just so darn good! I’ve really enjoyed your recent recipes using miso paste as well because that’s another food I absolutely adore.

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Chris     at 8:45 pm

i’m split between vancouver, bc and pennsylvania–while groceries are pricier up north, the difference is not that pronounced.

capers vs whole foods vs safeway; same as in america–it depends where one shops. i could go nuts and do all my shopping at whole foods or urban fare, spending a thousand bucks between the girlfriend and i, but i don’t. for anyone around one, give h-mart a try.

similarly in the US–tofu at h-mart, the asian grocer, can go for $.99 while my regular grocery store charges $2.99.

shop around when in canada!

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Marty Reply:

I never shop at Safeway, they’re so expensive! Vans Gluten-free Vegan Waffles I buy at Fred Meyers at $3.29/box, on sale for $2.98. At Safeway the regular price is $4.35/box. That’s where I’m a snob for Fred Meyers! I didn’t understand how people can afford to shop at Safeway!

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Amy     at 11:30 pm

I love grocery shopping too!!! It is definitely one of my weekly highlights. My partner and I live in Portland, OR and we tend to spend about $300-$400 per month on groceries, including non-food items. We buy mostly organic, so that definitely increases the cost. Since we live in an apartment, we can’t garden… Hopefully someday!! Oh, and hooray for mushrooms!!!!!!

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Sara     at 3:26 am

I was just wondering why you don’t buy organic mushrooms?

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Emily Malone Reply:

They are harder to find at our stores, and honestly just SO freaking expensive.

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Sara Reply:

Ah, that makes sense. I thought maybe there was something I didn’t know about mushrooms! :)

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Hilary     at 6:50 am

Hi Emily, I love your blog. Thank you for sharing all that you do. All of your recipes that I have tried turn out great! Would you be able to take a picture of the ingredients list of the Field Roast Veggie Dogs and post? Thanks! hil

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Jordan Wandfluh     at 7:15 am

This is a bit off topic but I wanted to know your thoughts about something. I was given the opportunity to run a half marathon I have been wanting to run but it sold out. I would have been running under someone elses name. I finally decided against it because I didn’t want to get a good time under his name. I could have ran without the chip but I like seeing my time afterwards. What are your thoughts on running under someone elses name?

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Emily Malone Reply:

That’s tough. I have never done it, and I think it would really become a problem if you risked getting an age group award or affecting someone else’s standings in the results. I know some people feel very passionately that it should never be done. I sort of feel like if you plan to be in the back or middle of the pack, it’s not that big of a deal.

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Jen     at 7:15 am

I used to think you ate healthy but now looking at the amount of tofu and processed things in your diet I realized that u don’t, and honey tofu is not lightly processed it’s extremely processed, if ur wanting something lightly processed go for tempeh!

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Emily Malone Reply:

An extremely processed diet? Some tofu and clif bars? I feel very comfortable with what I eat. The great thing about being individuals is that we get to choose what we eat. What works for me may not work for you, but it also doesn’t have to. Have a good weekend!

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Marty Reply:

Whoa, I agree with Emily. Tempeh is just as processed, and I eat that too. You want unprocessed? Then eat only whole grains, nuts, seeds and legumes, fruits and veggies. I’d say Emily and her family have a great diet, ESP with Emily being a great chef.

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Raia Reply:

Why why why with the judge-y s**t?

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Sarah Reply:

mmm, no judgement but this is some information I found out over the weekend…I went grocery shopping and met an asian lady who owned an organic shop and who came from a family of vegans and vegetarians. I specifically went there to buy miso and started talking to her about the fermentation process of foods, etc, anyway I asked her how much is too much tofu, she a qualified herbalist and nutritionist replied…people eat too much tofu and soy products…if your on a plant based diet and your only eating tofu than 1-2 times a week is enough anymore and your straining organs, plus women are more affected especially older women if they eat too much…if your drinking soy or having other soy protducts than its even less…she did state that tempeh is better due to the process it goes through plus its whole beans…she also stated that so many veggo’s in the western world go overboard on soy for protein because your made to believe you need so much of it but protein is in “everything” and a plant based diet of just grains, beans legumes nuts seeds, veggies and fruit is plenty! If you can’t cope on a diet like this than your body may need to eat a little animal product (dairy, egg, meat. fish) to function! She advised everyones body is different. But to go veg and than pig out everyday on processed soy products is just as bad as eating junk food. Thought this info might help since she is qualified and all!

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Raia Reply:

Well then it sounds like Emily should just eat chicken mcnuggets from Mcdonalds everyday since she already eats so much processed foods.

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Sylvs     at 7:18 am

I can’t wait until you post Cullen’s daily meal plan, I would love to know what a vegetarian child eats!

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Sam @ Fit for My Fork     at 8:39 am

I love grocery shopping too! My boyfriend HATES it, so we tend to whip in and whip out, but I like to take my time and compare things and look at ingredient lists.

Budget wise, we spend about £50-60 a week to feed both of us, plus usually a little top up at the weekend for fresh stuff. Maybe another £10, max. I’d say our budget is pretty similar to yours, but we don’t have a child to pay for! Eep!

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Saleana     at 10:54 am

Emily, I love your blog! I read it everyday. Thanks for sharing all your ideas with us.
I’m a mother of two growing boys and we live in Portland Oregon. We are lucky to have a great selection of organic foods here. In the past year or so I have changed my families diet to more of a whole diet and I try to buy organic most of the time. My problem is I do “not” like grocery shopping. I get so overwhelmed with different choices and I feel my brain is all over the place when I’m shopping. I would love to hear your ideas on how not to get so overwhelmed.
I hope you guys have a great weekend! Saleana

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Stacey     at 11:43 am

Do you ever consider buying organic mushrooms? Living around some mushroom farms, it is very apparent to me that they grow conventional mushrooms in loads of manure from factory grown chickens and cows..

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Emily @ Life on Food     at 11:47 am

I enjoyed this post very much. Grocery shopping is one of my favorite things to do too. I have been known to go to 4 stores in one week just to get the best deal or the exact item I want.

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Betty     at 12:13 pm

Curious as to why ‘regular’ oatmeal wouldn’t work for babies – ie why buy baby oatmeal – just curious – reading yours and others blog help me keep up with trends
As for groceries – I’ve – sadly – never budgeted. We have a large/huge garden so lots of fresh, then frozen vegetables – inc onions and potatoes and squash so my marketing bill includes all the paper and cleaning stuff – but I do know I can spend less when there is less coming in the door.

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Hayley @ Oat Couture     at 1:23 pm

Ahh nothing better than a fully stocked fridge! :)

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Emily     at 2:14 pm

Hi! We are in the process of switching to more organic produce for my husband and I as I make all my little guys (7 months today!)food and it has all been organic but want him to be able to eat off our plates soon and it’s better for us too. We had lots of trouble with leaks w the 7th generation diapers but love the Earths Best ones. Who knew you could love diapers?

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Jules     at 3:37 pm

OK, I’ll finish reading this, but I stopped at “Draino” and had to comment…

We have this crappy old bathtub drain that was so slow, we would be up to our ankles in standing water by the time we took a shower. DH was putting Draino (yuk!) in at least once a month. I don’t like it, because it smells, it’s corrosive, and probably not good for the pipe in the long run. Plus, it wasn’t working. It would speed up the drain a little, but never really cleared it.

Enter baking soda and vinegar.

I took the grate off the drain, and dumped some baking soda down there. Let it sit a moment, then flushed it with vinegar.

The drain works better than ever. The water goes down immediately, and it hasn’t re-backed up, and this was over a month ago.

Talk about your natural cleaners! I think you can get anything clean with baking soda, vinegar, and lemon juice.

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yolande     at 5:57 pm

I just had this talk with my bf as we were buying groceries yesterday talking about the price. we go to a few different grocery stores and find the best prices – costco for almond milk nut butter spinach the organics are fairly cheap at costco :) then i go to our grocery store and buy the remaining things I need – cleaners, organic produce tofu .. we eat ALL organic here and I eat vegan and he eats vegan at home and occasionally when out to eat orders meaT. Our groceries average around 400-600 a month for both of us in Alberta Canada and we both eat ALOT :) so I think we do pretty good. I dont mind spending money on good food to nourish the body

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Holly     at 6:42 pm

I love grocery shopping too but I get so excited about the produce that I go a little crazy and can’t always eat all that I buy before it goes bad. This drives me crazy because I HATE throwing away food. I think a solution to this would be to plan out my meals ahead of time. It sounds like you do this based on your purchases and I would love to hear more about it!

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Shannon Bell     at 8:42 am

This was great to see! Before school (when both husband and I had jobs and not just him as it is now) we would buy all organic and really spend a lot of time and money on what we put in our bodies…now with school and 1 less income, things are much harder in that respect. We’re going to try to incorporate meal planning b.c we end up buying so much stuff that we don’t use etc… I’m just worried what we plan for a meal won’t be what I’m craving one day and it won’t be worth my time to make it! I guess that’s probably something I could deal with :-)

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Colleen @ Miss Petite Sweets     at 8:45 am

I LOVE grocery shopping too. It has always been one of my favorite errands, and people always told me that was weird..until I became a food blogger. Now I see all my fellow food bloggers love it as well!

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Mrs M     at 1:16 am

I love this post! My family think I am mad for spending extra money on organic food & eco products – but my view is why take the risk if the alternative is relatively easily accessable.

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Susan Fine     at 5:48 am

you can grind up brown rice in your blender and make your own rice cereal for cullen — cheaper and not processed.

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Lara     at 10:58 am

Emily, I was so astonished that you spent so little on groceries. I did a survey on FB and asked all my friends (who mostly eat organic and many are vegetarian and have kids) and they all were surprised that you and a bunch of the other folks here spent so little. Do you shop at whole foods or trader joes or traditional grocery stores for organic? Or farmers markets ? I would like to curb my shopping habit but wanted to find out where you shop. -Lara

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Emily Malone Reply:

I shop at Trader Joe’s and Fred Meyer mostly. We also do farmers’ markets for specific things, and we’re looking into starting a CSA this summer!

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Diana @ frontyardfoodie     at 6:26 pm

Seriously loved reading all the comments and this post.

My husband, 1 1/2 year old and I spend $110 every two weeks on groceries. I shop at Trader Joe’s, Aldi and Hyvee and try to do a lot of organic. But I make everything from scratch so that cuts down a lot of cost and we don’t eat much meat.

Also, we eat out maybe once a month…so this is for reals. I’m damn proud of that number.

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PoochesForPeace (Anna H.)     at 4:13 pm

we also absolutely LOVE mushrooms!

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Christina     at 2:56 pm

Doesn’t Almond Breeze contain Carageenan? I’ve been hearing a lot about the negatives of Carageenan. You might want to google it.

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