about me

    Emily Malone

    culinary arts grad. nutrition facts lover. vegetarian chef. marathon runner. country music maniac. failed dog trainer. barre fanatic. loving mama.

    Contact Emily

    EmilyBMalone@gmail.com

    Search

    What’s Cooking?

    Personal Bests

    5K - 23:28

    10K - 52:35

    15K - 1:38:14

    1/2 Marathon - 1:57:39

    Marathon - 3:50:58

    A Look Back.



Visiting Pigs Peace Sanctuary.

Saturday was a day that I had looked forward to for over a year.  Last spring we had just moved to Seattle when I read this inspiring post from my friend Gena.  Reading about her trip to an animal sanctuary really resonated with me, and I acted on her encouragement to find one in my own area.  My search led me to Pigs Peace Sanctuarya safe haven of love for pigs and their friends.

IMG_5471 (640x421)

I wasn’t able to get there within the visiting season last year, so I made sure to get my visit set up for this year.  Located on 34 beautiful acres just north of Seattle (in Stanwood), Pigs Peace is a non-profit sanctuary dedicated to providing a safe haven for animals that have been abused, neglected, or abandoned, and to spreading a message of compassion and caring.

IMG_5546 (640x427)

When we pulled up to the farm, we were greeted with rolling green grass, smells of fresh hay, and a vibrant woman named Judy, who emanates love and passion for her work – and her pigs.  She conducts visits by appointment only so that she can lead small groups (ours was just six), allowing us to ask many questions and really feel connected to the stories.

She led us to the first shelter barn, where two giant pigs laid sleeping in the hay.  Immediately the sanctuary name rang in my mind – peaceful indeed.

IMG_5483 (640x427)

It is one thing to be an animal lover, but it is entirely different to actually be in their presence.  I was amazed at the sheer size of these pigs – some of whom weighed up to 900 pounds.  And yet they looked so gentle and peaceful, napping in the sunshine on a hot summer day.

IMG_5485 (640x427)

The farm was decorated with colorful signs and pig art everywhere you looked.  You can tell that it is a true labor of love.  In the main barn, there were also big signs hanging with facts about pigs and the farming industry.

IMG_5487 (640x427)

After meeting a few of the big pigs sleeping in the hay, Judy led our group out to the feeding pavilion – a large concrete slab located under a fenced lookout area.  She told us we’d be feeding the pigs their dinner, and then pointed to 100 pounds of carrots.

IMG_5488 (640x427)

We hauled the carrots over to the feeding area.

IMG_5489 (427x640)

And as she rang a loud bell, we started hurling carrots through the air.  As we tossed, suddenly pigs emerged from every direction.

IMG_5493

The main pig area stretches deep into the woods, and has shelters, ponds, and plenty of room for the pigs to roam.  Before reaching Pigs Peace, many of these pigs had never felt live grass or sunshine, but now they have acres to roam and explore.  Over 150 pigs call this area home, and they all came running for their fill of carrots.

IMG_5494 (640x427)

As we watched them eat, Judy could point out each and every one of them by name, and she shared some of their stories, as well as facts about pigs.  Pigs are incredibly social animals, and over their long natural life spans, they make lasting friendships.  Judy could easily identify which pigs liked to roam and sleep together, and it was fun to watch them hang out in groups as they grazed. 

IMG_5500 (640x413)

As the pigs happily snacked and we watched from above, I asked her a few of the many questions rolling through my head.  Where did all these pigs come from?  The larger pink and black pigs were mostly rescued from bad farming situations – some were even escapees from factory farms.  Most of the smaller pot bellied pigs were either abused or abandoned pets.  For whatever reason, having pigs as pets became trendy for a while, and sadly many pigs suffered as a result. 

IMG_5507 (640x427)

After dinner time was over, we were taken into some of the smaller shelters.  Older pigs and pigs with special needs are kept in separate enclosures and smaller groups.  The first pig we met was Elsie.

IMG_5521 (640x427)

She was brought to Pigs Peace as an 8 week old piglet, after falling out of a pickup truck on a Washington highway.  She arrived with pneumonia, a broken hip, and many other severe injuries.  And yet on Saturday, none of that showed in her gentle demeanor and bright eyes.

IMG_5519 (640x427)

She welcomed us into her space, and snorted when we scratched her ears.  Many long months of rehabilitation and love on the farm have hopefully helped her to heal from her traumas.

IMG_5528 (640x427)

We moved along into the special needs pen, where we met Ziggy – a gigantic pink teddy bear. 

IMG_5532 (640x427)

Gorgeous Ziggy was a three-legged piglet that was on display at a Canadian roadside zoo.  The plan was to feed her to the lions once she grew up and “lost her cuteness.”  She had no bedding and no indoor shelter during a Canadian winter.  Thankfully, several people reported her conditions, and Judy arranged for her to be brought to Pigs Peace.

I could have sat and scratched her belly for hours.  She was gigantic – easily bigger than me, but laying next to her felt like curling up with a big lap dog.

IMG_5543 (640x427)

There were a few little potbellied piglets running around in the special needs area as well – keeping spirits high and keeping the old and more limited pigs still feeling young.

IMG_5536 (640x427)

I’ve thought quite a bit about how I wanted to share this visit with you.  While I feel very passionate about my vegetarian lifestyle, I rarely touch on the ethics that fuel my choices so deeply.  It is important to me that this space be a place where all diets and lifestyles are welcomed. 

With that said, I can’t help but want to share how strongly I feel about animal rights and food ethics.  A big part of my decision to become vegetarian was health-based, but as my experience evolved, ethics became the driving force of my commitment. 

IMG_5541 (640x427)

In the days that led up to our visit, I found myself having to explain that we were going to a “pig sanctuary” several times.  It was a reminder that our beliefs and our values are not only in the minority, they are often not even understood.

IMG_5544 (640x427)

I have never liked groups that use scare tactics and graphic images of animal slaughter as a means to persuade people eat less meat. I would much rather show all the delicious food that is available to vegetarians, and hope to entice people to eat more plant-based meals by leading a healthy, happy example.

I know it is generally considered funny to joke that “everything is better with bacon.”  But my visit to Pigs Peace really drove home that there are smart, social, and peaceful giants who would definitely disagree.

IMG_5542 (640x427)

Visiting an animal sanctuary deepened my commitment to my lifestyle, and it motivated me to continue to do my own small part to help protect pigs like the ones we visited.  I would highly encourage anyone who is considering moving toward a more plant-based diet to look for a sanctuary in your area.  It is a powerful experience to look into the real faces of the food industry.

IMG_5470 (427x640)

It is the love here that flourishes. The animals feel it the moment they arrive and everyday. I am so grateful to do this work. Look in the eyes of the animals and you will see it. Look in the hopeful faces of the children and other visitors and you will see it. Come visit us and you will know the peace. – Judy Woods, Pigs Peace Sanctuary

 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

181 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Laura     at 7:56 pm

My favorite post you have ever written. Perfect.

[Reply]

Samantha Angela Reply:

I completely agree. This was a great post.

[Reply]

Karis Reply:

Me too. A wonderful post. Definitely my favorite.

[Reply]

Hannah     at 7:58 pm

Oh, this is so beautiful. You totally do the ‘diet’ and the animals justice. I have been vegetarian for over a year now, and it just keeps getting better. This made me tear up. Animals are so special. You’ve got a reader for life!

[Reply]

Leatitia     at 8:02 pm

Beautiful! We’ve been disconnected from the source of ‘our’ food for a while now. Seeing the animals and realizing how they’re treated can really change mindsets.

Most people I know don’t want chicken to spend their lives in 12″X12″ cages, never being able to see the sun. Yet, the vast majority buys regular eggs. If people were aware of how they’re treated, I’m sure a lot of them would change their buying habits and ask for new laws to protect animal rights.

I don’t want an animal to live an atrocious life for me to be able to eat an egg or even meat. There are respectful ways to eat meat. Animals can have great lives outdoor and be treated with respect.

[Reply]

Leah Reply:

I agree! It’s so worth it on so many levels to only buy eggs from responsible (and local) egg purveyors. We’re ethical carnivores in my house as well. :)

[Reply]

Bitt     at 8:02 pm

So glad you went! And shared it with us. If you get a chance, Pasados Safe Haven is also in the area and a great place to visit lots of rescued animals too. They have tours once a month. I’m sure you’d love it.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks Bitt! I will definitely check out Pasados – haven’t heard of that one!

[Reply]

Abby @ Change of Pace     at 8:04 pm

Wow- what an amazing day. My husband is vegan (mostly for ethical reasons) and I will definitely be sharing this post with him.
I love that you wrote about them being social and making friendships. It’s easy to think of some animals as meat, but they really aren’t that different from our pets.

[Reply]

Natalia     at 8:05 pm

Such a lovely, well written and heart-felt post. Pigs are such fantastic creatures – I understand that it is naive to expect everyone to become vegetarian or vegan overnight.. but hopefully posts like this encourage people to think about where their food comes from – and at the very least, acknowledge that if they’re going to eat pork, eat it from a pig whose life was closer to the one these lucky one’s lead. Love and oinks :) x

[Reply]

Heather (Heather's Dish)     at 8:05 pm

beautifully said!

[Reply]

RachelSD     at 8:11 pm

Great post, Emily, thanks for sharing. Your blog (and others like it) have helped me go mostly meat-free for the last 3 years.

If you want to read a sweet biography of an adored pig, you should try “The Good Good Pig: The Extraordinary Life Of Christopher Hogwood” by his ‘mom’ Sy Montgomery. I haven’t been able to look at a pig in the same way since I read it.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

I will definitely check it out – haven’t heard of it!

[Reply]

Gena     at 8:19 pm

One of my favorite posts of yours, EVER. I am so grateful to you for sharing your compassion with us all, and I’m so glad you’ve found a haven to which you can contribute your love!!

And PS — we need to find ourselves in the same city soon :)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks for all your inspiration!

[Reply]

Hannah     at 8:22 pm

Thank you so much for sharing this! I would love to visit an animal sanctuary like this, and actually meet these animals in a wonderful situation. As a 12 year vegetarian who loves to cook, active person, and currently trying to conceive my own first baby, everything about your blog really resonates with me. Thanks for being you and writing about it.

[Reply]

Natalie Rae     at 8:22 pm

Have you been to the Sidecar for Pigs Peace store in the U district? LOVE IT- it helps support the sanctuary and every once in a while it does bake sales.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Yes, love Sidecar!

[Reply]

Laura (Blogging Over Thyme)     at 8:23 pm

Really beautiful post! Those pigs are adorable, especially the little pot bellies. I really admire the way you talk about your diet and lifestyle–you are never preachy, which I often think in the end only alienates people.

On a side note though, I think its important to note that for those who DO want to continue to eat meat, that there are farms where animals can be treated just as well as this–I have visited Polyface and Ayrshire Farms in VA and both places treated their animals wonderfully and trully respect them. Supporting those types of farms can make a huge difference as well!

[Reply]

Krissy @ Shiawase Life Reply:

I agree with all of these comments, Laura! My visit to Polyface also made me deeply think about how my choices effect the lives of others – people and animals alike.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Good points, Laura! I know there are a lot of people who are choosing to find “ethical farms” more and more, and I think any moves in that direction should be applauded.

[Reply]

RJ     at 8:33 pm

I love this post. What beautiful creatures. Thank you for sharing this is such a special way. :)

[Reply]

Hillary     at 8:42 pm

Thank you for sharing! I became a vegetarian 15 years ago when, as a young teenager, I realized where my food came from. While I certainly respect every individual’s right to chose their own diet and lifestyle, it is really refreshing to hear from others who share my beliefs. Please keep setting a good example!

[Reply]

Army Amy*     at 8:42 pm

This really touched me. I can’t believe that people treat living creatures so heinously. Thank goodness for the caring people in this world that dedicate their lives to protecting animals.*

[Reply]

Maggie @ A Bitchin' Kitchen     at 8:44 pm

This is such a great post!

I was a vegetarian through high school and most of college, and gave it up over the years. However, I watched Food, Inc. several months ago, and have been trying to be much more responsible about the sources of beef & pork that I purchase.

Just out of curiosity, what’s your take on the argument that a diet containing meat can be done ethically? For example, buying grass-fed, free-range beef, and avoiding purchasing pork from companies like Smithfield. Just genuinely curious about your side – totally not trying to be argumentative :)

Not gonna lie…seeing their cute little piggie faces makes me feel so guilty!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

As far as ethical meat eating goes, I think any steps taken toward reducing support for factory farms and animal cruelty should be applauded. For me personally, it’s not enough. I don’t like the idea of animals being raised with the specific purpose of slaughter. Even if a cow has a lovely few years of roaming in pastures, it doesn’t change the fact that he would like live 20+ years if allowed.

But I would much rather see someone buy beef from a local farmer than walk out of the grocery store with the super value steaks.

[Reply]

Alejandra Reply:

Hi Emily,

I absolutely loved reading that post and would like to follow up on Maggie’s comment and ask you (genuinely curious and without trying to be argumentative) what is stopping you from being vegan?

[Reply]

Allison F.     at 8:46 pm

It’s really nice to see you touch on the ethical reasons that have come to sustain your vegetarianism. I certainly don’t think any number of posts on this topic, written as gently as this one, would turn away even meat-eating readers. I find it refreshing when vegetarian and vegan food bloggers remind readers not only of the detrimental health effects, but also of the ethical issues surrounding meat/dairy/etc. It’s too easy for people to turn a blind eye to it all. Thank you for this post, Emily!

[Reply]

Natasha     at 8:51 pm

Such a perfect post! So many vegetarians and vegans are leary of commenting too much about the ethical reasons they choose not to eat meat, in fear of offending other’s dietary choices. This was tastefully written and my favorite post of yours thus far!

[Reply]

Katie @ Serenity in the Storm     at 8:55 pm

So glad you made it to Pigs Peace. I volunteer there once a week, and it’s usually by far the best part of my week. Judy is totally exceptional and Pigs Peace really is like no other sanctuary I’ve visited. Thanks for the post!

[Reply]

Leah Reply:

That is amazing that you are able to volunteer at Pigs Peace. :) It’s the best kind of volunteer work! :) I volunteer as a farm ambassador at a Farm Sanctuary here in Massachusetts. I put the link below.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks for volunteering, Leah! I wish the farm was closer and I could make it out there once a week or so to help. Maybe if I can convince some family to move out here to help us, I can make that happen! :)

[Reply]

Leah Reply:

Emily,
Awww, you are most welcome! It’s been very rewarding these last 12+ years. :) Even if volunteering at Pigs Peace weekly does not work (at this point) you can always be involved in the organization (fundraisers, special events, visiting and making it a part of Cullen’s life as he grows). :)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

How wonderful that you are volunteering there! I really wish I was able to get out there and help. Need to figure out how to balance childcare with Cullen to eventually see if I can make it happen. What a special place! Give Ziggy a scratch for me next time you’re there. :)

[Reply]

Katie @ Serenity in the Storm Reply:

Will definitely give Ziggy a scratch for you. What a sweetheart she is! I totally hear you about figuring out the childcare/volunteering balance. Sidecar always needs bakers for their seasonal bakesales, which is such a fun way to get involved from home. I can certainly forward you the call for the fall sale when I get it. :-)

[Reply]

Michelle @ A Healthy Mrs     at 9:01 pm

Great post! I’m so glad places like this exist!

[Reply]

Amy Ramos     at 9:08 pm

So inspiring. While I do eat meat, it is becoming less and less these days. It breaks my heart that animals are abused and neglected. However, it warms my heart to know there are sanctuaries like this. So peaceful…..

[Reply]

Andrea     at 9:28 pm

This is so touching…what a wonderful post. I had no idea this place existed! My mom grew up on a farm in Kansas and while the pigs there had a different outcome… She still talks about Rosie the pig and how as kids it was really hard to deal with Rosie the pig vs. Rosie the slab of meat . Personally, I am literally one leg over the fence into veggie land. Your blog has been a huge help in adding dishes to my meatless dinners and meals and overcoming my fear of tofu. Thanks for being a great source of.. well… everything.. recipes, animals and of course that little cutie-pie. :)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

You are most welcome! :)

[Reply]

Abby     at 9:46 pm

Thank you for sharing this! I became a vegetarian a little over a year ago, and while I’ve never looke back, it can definitely be hard when you live in the Texas Panhandle. Almost everyone here is related to or knows a rancher (heck, half my mom’s family are ranchers!), so it actually offends a lot of people when I tell them I don’t eat meat, especially when I tell them it’s for ethical reasons when they ask. When you drive down the road around here, you see herds of cattle grazing on pastures- they don’t understand what’s wrong with that. Unfortunately, they don’t realize that’s not how 97% of cattle in America is raised.

[Reply]

Megan     at 10:34 pm

I’m not sure if I’ve ever commented before, but I’m a longtime reader and just had to thank you for this post. I’ve been vegetarian pretty much my whole life and vegan for about three years now, and I understand the fear of offending people or sounding preachy. I think your approach of just setting a good example and showing people how delicious and diverse a plant-based diet can be is a really good start, and it’s what I try to do as well.

Maybe we’re sometimes too worried about coming across as “preachy” as I’ve had to endure countless rants from meat eaters judging my diet through the years when I’ve said absolutely nothing offensive about their own. Anyway, I really identify with your feelings and thanks so much for sharing your experience with us. I’m glad to know such places exist.

[Reply]

Lena Reply:

I can totally relate to the being considered ”preachy”. I’m vegan and people comment on that all the time. Either they ‘justify’ themselves, or they make fun of me or they think I’m going to die from poor nutrition. Which is funny, because I eat much better now than I ever did. Once I realized that cooking vegan is just an entirely different way of eating, it became super easy too.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

It is funny how often I hear rants and justifications from others, when I really do tend to keep my mouth closed about my own choices and beliefs. I often think that those shouting the loudest are the least comfortable in their decisions.

[Reply]

Natasha Reply:

I keep my mouth shut now too, after being considered “preachy” when someone would ask me why I don’t eat meat. Even my own family likes to poke fun and me and my hubby’s choices. It’s frustrating. We live in beef/rodeo country with my nephew desiring to be a bull rider and his dad being expro rider. I’ve never been to one of his rides, as it goes against every bit of what I believe so I’m the black sheep. It sucks. I hold true to my beliefs though and never allow myself to be swayed into doing anything against my morals.

[Reply]

Janey     at 11:07 pm

I have a lot of respect for vegetarians and vegans,and I also feel all people have the choice to eat and drink whatever they feel like.

That being said,I do eat meat even though I am a huge animal lover. As you know,pigs are omnivores,meaning they eat both plants and meats in their diets,and I’m pretty sure they don’t feel the least bit guilty about the meat they eat.

[Reply]

Natalia Reply:

Hi Janey, just a couple of words in reply: a) it’s not necessarily about eating meat per se, but the way humans treat the animals destined to become our food. Pigs might eat meat, but they never started industrialized farming. And b) that pigs ‘don’t look guilty’ raises the philosophical point that, as humans, given our ‘gift’ of higher understanding, we are in a position of great power – we are not at the mercy of nature’s programming (a pig eats because its brain tells it that it’s food). We have a CHOICE. We can choose to care – or we can choose to abuse our power.

[Reply]

Steph M. Reply:

Well said Natalia.

[Reply]

Alex @ Alex Eats Green Reply:

Agreed.

[Reply]

Leah Reply:

Have you read ‘Eating Animals’? I thought that is was a really great (and well researched) book.

[Reply]

Natalia Reply:

That’s one of my favourite books :)

[Reply]

Sophie Reply:

“With great power, comes great responsibility!”

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Hey Janey. I know what you are saying about pigs, and I definitely have no intention of starting a vegetarian debate here. I’ll just add that pigs eat meat as part of a natural circle of life process. They aren’t farming another species in order to satisfy their tastes. And while they do appear to be very smart, I’m not sure that feeling guilt is within their capabilities.

[Reply]

Gabrielle Reply:

Janey, you’re right that humans do have a choice, and I think wild pigs would naturally forage, eating a plant based diet. Animals raised on industrialized farms eat what they’re fed, and other animal byproducts are often included in their feed which is mostly made up of genetically modified corn produced on a mass scale. Corn which is not a natural diet for animals such as cows. That said, it’s not really about guilt, it’s about conscious consumption, thinking about the animals you’re eating, how they’re raised, and the fact, as Emily mentioned in another comment, that their lives are dramatically shortened by slaughtering them so humans can eat them instead of plants. It’s all, excuse the pun, food for thought. And thinking is a good thing, as is eating yummy food. Emily shows us how yummy a plant based diet can be. :)

[Reply]

Mai     at 11:28 pm

Loved this post and the way the message came across. I’m definitely going to look for a nearby sanctuary!

[Reply]

Kate     at 11:52 pm

I grew up on a farm and earned enough money to pay my way through college by raising cows & pigs for slaughter, so for me, I see nothing wrong with eating animals. It is a way of life for many people and there are so many struggling farmers who are eeking out a living and honestly, raising livestock is the only way they can keep their heads above water—especially this year with crops drying up. I do try to purchase free-range/cagefree as much as possible and support smaller farms because I do believe God put animals on this Earth to be treated as humanely as possible. I don’t think anything could ever make me give up bacon though.

[Reply]

Christine @ BookishlyB     at 12:09 am

Probably my favorite post of yours. If only all animals were so lucky!

[Reply]

Marisa     at 1:46 am

Thank you for sharing this wonderful, touching experience with us. This is definitely one of my favorites post of yours!

[Reply]

Emily     at 2:23 am

I absolutely adore pigs. They are extremely intelligent and apparently can be trained beyond the level of a dog – especially in sorting type tasks.

I have been a vegetarian for ten years and also try not to be evangelical about it: it tends to put people off. In the time I have been vegetarian I have noticed more people eating less meat (in the UK, anyway). Some veggie brands (like Quorn) have been marketed for health benefits and barely mention being vegetarian in their adverts now.

The thing that is most striking to me about attitudes to animals is that many people automatically view any farmed/eating animal as dumb. They may think piglets or lambs etc are cute, but they essentially view them as without feelings. Anything which helps people understand that these animals all function in groups, build relationships, have skills, emotion, feel fear etc is a very good thing in my view.

Can you do cows next? I adore cows. And they are such sociable animals (step in a cow field and they just follow you around for company).

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Haha I’ll have to see if there are any cow sanctuaries near us! I’d definitely like to find more places like this to support.

[Reply]

Vicky (Sweet and Healthy Living)     at 3:11 am

I love pigs! They seem like very sweet and gentle creatures! I too became vegetarian for health reasons, but now feel strongly about the animal rights.

[Reply]

Erica { EricaDHouse.com }     at 3:23 am

Aww I actually got a bit teary eyed at this! I’ve been a vegetarian for over 5 years now and it started off primarily for animal rights reasons (in addition to the incredible health benefits). Thank you so much for being such a wonderful advocate for the cause!

[Reply]

Lena     at 3:25 am

While I do think it’s great that you are thinking about your food choices, there is one thing that doesn’t make sense to me at all: you say you care about animal welfare so deeply (which is great), but I was just wondering how eating eggs and dairy fits into that concept? I don’t mean to criticize, I just really have trouble understanding it. I do find pigs much cuter than, say, hens, but I don’t feel like that’s justifying exploiting the hen for her menstrual byproduct and ‘letting’ the pig live.

I think it is great that you raise issues like this on your blog! I just thought that if you start thinking about it, why not think it to the end.

(btw, I’m vegan)

[Reply]

Natalia Reply:

Hi Lena, I really appreciate your thoughts on this, because it opens up room for discussion – Id like to ask you why (and I hope you see my question as genuine, not critical!) is it not ok to eat eggs from a chicken who lives a happy, contented life? I don’t eat eggs from the supermarket, because I can’t be 100% sure of the conditions the chickens are kept in… but my friend owns a handful of very happy, shiny hens, who are free to roam on acres of land, and get fed a healthy diet of veggies and scraps. I don’t feel at all bad eating their eggs – I just can’t see the harm! But if you’d like to offer an alternative perspective, please do.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Natalia – this is how we feel too. We eat eggs because there absolutely ARE ways to find them from good sources, if you’re willing to put in the effort (and it sounds like you are!).

[Reply]

Laura Reply:

But in the end, once the chickens cease to lay adequate amounts of eggs they get sent to the aborttoir. Thus the average life of a free-range, organic, local egglaying chicken in the UK is 18 months. I doubt this is any different in all but a few places in the US. Also, I think some feel that by continuing to eat eggs despite finding a compassionate source is feeding into the herd culture of eggs being entwined into our cuisines such that most of the population will also continue to buy eggs to cook with but, unlike you, purchase them from battery farms. Also, have you ever considered where all the roosters go? It is a rare farm where profits are abundant enough that a farmer will save all the male chicks- and keep them, by necessity away from the hens. These issues of course are over and above the wish to not ‘exploit’ animals that the Vegan Society touts. To each their own, though!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Hey Lena! Thanks for your thoughts. I actually don’t eat dairy right now – haven’t for about a year now. I’m not sure if that’s a permanent change or not – time will tell. As far as eggs and dairy go however, I do feel it is possible to do the work to find good sources for these products – where no animals are killed for their eggs/milk, and they are treated with respect and love. We only buy eggs from very specific places in order to ensure they came from farms we feel comfortable supporting. Hopefully that makes sense!

[Reply]

meghan Reply:

Totally agree that if you put in the work, eggs can be consumed without guilt! Dairy is trickier for me. Getting milk from a cow means that, even though the specific cow giving the milk may have a happy, local farm life, what happens to the calf that she had to birth in order to give the milk? For most farms it is too much of an economic burden to keep the calves around to feed and raise and therefore they must be sold. That’s where the tricky part is – where does that calf go? To another happy farm? To a factory farm? To a family to raise for meat? Those questions are a little harder to answer.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Yep, I know what you mean. We’ve actually been off dairy for about a year now. I don’t like to make big claims or use labels since I don’t know what will change with time, but for now, we’re dairy free. :)

[Reply]

Gabrielle Reply:

Even in the kindest dairy farming situation, the calves are still pulled from their mothers so humans can take the mother cow’s milk instead of the baby for whom it is intended. The male calves are unwanted, and most often sold for veal. People think dairy is kind, in general, but it’s one of the cruelest industries in animal farming really. Glad you’re currently dairy free, Emily.

[Reply]

Joy @ The Joy Vey     at 3:38 am

What a beautiful post – I have to agree with the others who have commented that they got teary-eyed while reading! Thanks so much for sharing your perspective in a such a tactful, graceful manner. Definitely looking into sanctuaries near me.

[Reply]

Erin     at 4:16 am

Absolutely beautiful post. Thank you so much for sharing your trip (and your life in general) on here. My husband and I are making it a priority to switch to a more plant based diet. Your blog always offers up delicious recipes to help ease him into it. :)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

So happy to hear it, Erin!

[Reply]

L     at 4:18 am

Thanks for sharing your adventure. It is a beautiful story. It made me tear up. I heart animals!!!

[Reply]

Ali @ Peaches and Football     at 4:46 am

I’ve never heard of a sanctuary for pigs but what a fantastic place for them! We have a no-kill animal shelter for dogs and cats a bit over an hour away and do fundraisers for them every year. Plus, they always welcome people to come and sit with or walk the pets.

I’d assume most animal shelters are the same and would encourage anyone to stop over once to give the animals some love.

What did Cullen think of the pigs? I bet it was quite a sight to see them all scurrying out of hiding to get their carrots!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

He loved them! He was also kind of tired and it was 90 degrees out, so he only lasted about an hour. :)

[Reply]

Laine     at 4:58 am

What a lovely post! I eat meat, but have found sources where the cows are grass fed (and I can see the farm and then buy a cow to share with my family), the pigs are pastured and my friends raise them, the chickens are outside and scratching in the dirt and the lamb are wandering around a field. It takes a little bit of work to find these sources, but its worth it to me to know that the animals were treated humanly and allowed to live in their natural habitat until they are, well, slaughtered.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

That’s great that you have made the effort to find good sources for your food!

[Reply]

Shari     at 5:10 am

What a beautiful and special place — and post. Thank you for sharing it with us.

[Reply]

sheryl     at 5:25 am

thank you for sharing your visit.

[Reply]

Whitney     at 5:26 am

I will never understand how anyone can be so cruel and mean to any animal. They are such innocent creatures and deserved to be treated humanely. Thanks for shedding light on this issue; brought me to tears!

[Reply]

Colleen     at 5:34 am

LOVE pigs! LOVE this post!

[Reply]

Jen     at 5:37 am

Absolutely love this and wish I lived nearby so I could visit! Thank you for sharing.

[Reply]

lauren     at 5:40 am

as a huge animal advocate, thank you for this post.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

:) you are most welcome!

[Reply]

Kelly     at 5:44 am

I absolutely adore pigs! I am going to have to find a sanctuary nearby as I would love to visit one. They really are such sweet, beautiful creatures. Thank you for sharing your experience with us and for not succumbing to “the lecture”. We all make choices in life, and we all have to stand by and live with those choices. That includes the food we put in our mouths. It’s up to each of us to make the best decisions for us, for our lifestyles. It’s good to be open, though, and I think your post and your attitude is right on.

[Reply]

Danielle     at 5:53 am

Loved this :) Pigs my be one of my favorite animals, and they were the first thing I cut out of my diet on my never-ending quest to be a vegetarian. And, regardless of if a person eats meat or not, I think this post was great just to share the experience – and who knows, you may have opened up a few more eyes!

[Reply]

Anne     at 5:55 am

I had the chance to spent a complete day with a 3 months old pig and really, they are similar to dogs. They like to cuddle, smell, talk ; they are very intelligent. I rarely eat meat, maybe once every 2 months, but I choose ethical meat, and I refuse to eat “babies” (lamb, veal…). Thanks for this post.

[Reply]

Christina     at 5:55 am

This was a really interesting post, Emily, and as a meat-eater I definitely learned from your experience! I think the best thing any of us can do – regardless of our diet or ethical views – is to be an educated consumer. I have personally learned a lot over the years about the true meaning of various food labels (for example, “cage free” eggs bought in the supermarket don’t necessarily mean very much!) and this knowledge helps shape my choices. Thanks for sharing your perspectives with us.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

I absolutely agree, Christina. Knowing more about our food and where it comes from is so important. Labels and buzzwords can be very confusing these days, and it’s important to try to learn to distinguish what is authentic and what is a marketing ploy.

[Reply]

Cheryl     at 5:57 am

I LOVED this post!! Thank you for not pushing your views on people but still enlightening your readers.

[Reply]

Sarah     at 6:01 am

Wonderful post, Emily! Thank you so much for sharing, I’m so glad you got to experience this. It’s definitely on my list :)

[Reply]

Jane @ Healthy Happy Stylish Smart     at 6:07 am

Emily,

I’ve been a longtime reader but for some reason rarely commented– I just wanted to say this is a beautiful post and I love that you’re so passionate about your beliefs. My boyfriend and I are working toward a completely vegetarian diet, which is saying a lot for a Texas boy and a Nebraska girl, where meat eating is practically a virtue. You shouldn’t apologize for posting about something so close to your heart on your blog; you make it clear that you’re not forcing anything on anyone, and your readers should know they’re free to agree or not agree! Now I want to go meet some friendly pigs!

xo Jane

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks Jane! :)

[Reply]

Jennifer     at 6:11 am

What a beautiful post, Emily! I teared up reading it. I have always loved pigs, and I wish I could visit a sanctuary for animals, but none of the surrounding states have one.

I consider myself a vegetarian, but I will have a few bites of meat if someone has me over for dinner, or order fish at a restaurant if there are no other healthy choices (I don’t live in a veggie-friendly area). But posts like this make me think I need to be more diligent to stick to my beliefs about not eating meat because that helps me not only physcially, but mentally.

[Reply]

Alex @ Alex Eats Green     at 6:16 am

What a wonderful post. I struggle with the same thing on my blog – whether to discuss the ethics of animal treatment or not. After reading Foer’s Eating Animals, there was no turning back from denying it. In particular, the chapter on pigs really struck a chord with me and I will never look at bacon the same way. This was eloquently written and I commend you for sticking your neck out a bit and telling people about your reasons behind vegetarianism/veganism. What cute little piggies!

[Reply]

Kerry Cloud-Pitt     at 6:24 am

Thank you so much for your post! You gently and compassionately shared a message that NEEDS to be shared. We were frequent visitors of Pigs Peace when living in Seattle. It was our annual Mother’s Day destination with my mom. I absolutely love those beautiful creatures and you captured the spirit of Judy’s mission so well in your post. Blessings!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

What a fabulous tradition!

[Reply]

Leah     at 6:33 am

Beautiful post, Emily. I volunteer at a farm that teaches kid’s programs. Farms like this that are actually a sanctuary for animals make a world of difference. :)

[Reply]

Leah     at 6:39 am

P.S. Here is a link to the farm I volunteer at! For anyone in New England it is a great day trip. :) http://www.massaudubon.org/Nature_Connection/Sanctuaries/Drumlin_Farm/index.php

[Reply]

Mikayla     at 6:41 am

Thank you so much for writing this. Sometimes it’s easy to get swayed by all the nay-sayers who just don’t have the same compassion for animals. Reminders like this help so much to keep fighting for what’s right. Pigs have always been my favorite animal and I can’t believe up until 2 years ago I still ate them. If only more people saw places like this I believe they would stop eating them too. Thank you!

[Reply]

Amanda     at 6:42 am

This is such a well-articulated, beautiful post. I initially became vegetarian (and now mostly vegan) for animal-rights and ethical reasons – the health benefits were a bonus at the time. There was a section in the book Eating Animals that talked about eating dogs in other cultures and the value that we place on different animals – dog versus pig versus chicken, for example – despite all of them being intelligent and feeling. When I started thinking of all animals the way I think of my dog (who is like a child to me), it completely solidified my commitment to a veggie lifestyle.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Eating Animals was a very influential book for me too – a great read.

[Reply]

Elyse     at 6:42 am

LOVE this post, especially the part about not using scare tactics and instead focusing on the positives of being vegetarian/vegan. I’d love to go to a sanctuary and I’m going to look one up in my area!

[Reply]

Katie @ Soulshine and Sassafras     at 7:01 am

Pigs are fantastic! I befriended the ones at my college, and would go and visit them every day. They are so incredibly intelligent and sweet – they really are very dog-like. I think if more people spent time with them, it would be harder for them to eat them – or at least to contribute to factory-farming, which gives them such an awful quality of life.

[Reply]

Michelle     at 7:03 am

This post resonated with me so much! I agree with you about not using scare tactics as a way to persuade people to eat less meat. I can’t look at that stuff. One of the most influential things that got me committed to a veggie lifestyle was an interview with Peter Singer from The Sun magazine. You can check it out here: http://www.thesunmagazine.org/issues/425/the_greater_good .

Thanks for blogging and keeping us inspired with your delicious recipes! Just joined a CSA for the first time that starts up next month– I’m super excited to have loads of produce delivered to my door!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks for sharing the interview – clicking over to read now. Enjoy the CSA! :)

[Reply]

Kate @ life's precious moments     at 7:04 am

Thank you so much for sharing this post! It beautifully written and has such a powerful message. I will definitely be looking into a sanctuary close to my home.

[Reply]

Jessica     at 7:04 am

This was a great post, Emily. You really walk a great line of inspiring others to think about where their food comes from and the ethical considerations that go into how we all our live our lives without judging or being confrontational. I really think that’s a rare gift. I have eaten vegetarian off and on for several years, but currently eat meat. This makes me want to strive again to be more conscientious and reconsider my current habits. Thank you!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thank you so much, Jessica!

[Reply]

Shaunna@mamas13minutemile     at 7:06 am

What a cool place! :)

[Reply]

Victoria @ The Pursuit of Hippieness     at 7:11 am

I LOVE this post! I’ve spent this summer taking an animal and environmental ethics class that focuses on the detrimental effects of factory farming and the idea that oftentimes “organic” and “local” are just buzzwords that mean less than they actually should. In particular, learning the details behind the unbelievably horrifying treatment of the vast majority of farmed animals completely solidified my status as a vegan, and I feel so much stronger about my beliefs than I ever have before. Sanctuaries like this are exactly what our country needs- it offers a little bit of hope to a pretty tragic situation!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Sounds like a wonderful class! I wish something like that had been offered when I was in college. Definitely agree on the buzzwords – they are too easy to use these days.

[Reply]

Samantha     at 7:15 am

I LOVE that you went there. This has been on my list – I finally got to see a couple that she brought to Wayward for their benefit bake sale. It is pretty amazing all she knows isn’t it? And all their stories. I very much remember the pot bellied craze out here, it was terrible.

By the way I used one of your recipes for a Wayward bake sale benefiting these guys. :) I think they very much embrace what animal welfare should be and I completely agree with you on the scare tactic-make-you-feel-bad organizations…this coming from a many year vegan.

Loved this! I am so glad you got out there.

[Reply]

Samantha Reply:

Oops…I meant Sidecar bake sale. :)

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks for using my recipe – how fun! I love Sidecar. So many great things for sale!

[Reply]

Kate     at 7:19 am

I love your blog, even though I am also a meat-lover. I follow the Paleo lifestyle, which strongly promotes buying your meat from a local source and knowing the conditions in which your animal is raised. There are a lot of us carnivores out here who are very against factory-farmed conditions, and I think that all of us together are slowly (ok, VERY slowly) changing the way the USA treats its animals.

[Reply]

Heather     at 7:36 am

Wonderfully written post Emily!

As a vegetarian family, my 10 year old daughter and I often find ourselves explaining our lifestyle choice, which is both ethically and health motivated.

You were able to express your experience so well wihout imposing your views on others.

Well done!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks Heather!

[Reply]

Kati     at 7:53 am

Great post – one of my favorites!!

[Reply]

Angela     at 7:55 am

This is such a great post! You are doing the vegetarian (and vegetarian mom) community proud! Thanks for this, I will definitely share it!

[Reply]

Katie     at 7:59 am

What a beautiful post! This had me in tears – in both sadness for the unfortunate pigs, but in happiness for the ones at this sanctuary.

[Reply]

Jill z     at 8:10 am

Beautiful post, Emily!

[Reply]

Elisabeth     at 8:11 am

Beautiful post, Emily! I am not a vegetarian (although I was for a while during college), but am definitely against cruel treatment of animals! I can’t understand why anyone would treat animals the way some of these pigs were treated…

[Reply]

Shannon @ My Place In The Race     at 8:34 am

Oh how precious!! I just love piggies :D So cute!

[Reply]

JennF     at 8:49 am

Loved this!

[Reply]

Julie     at 8:56 am

I love all of your posts, but this one is the best. The BEST! Thank you!

[Reply]

Lauren     at 9:06 am

Thank you for sharing! This was powerful!

[Reply]

Katie     at 9:09 am

I’m really glad I don’t have bacon with lunch today, but now I feel a little sick from the chicken I had. lol. Cute post!

[Reply]

Ananda     at 9:14 am

This was a very lovely post and I thank you for sharing. While I am not vegetarian, I definitely limit the types and sources of meat in my diet after reading The Omnivores Delimma and Eating Animals.
I was curious if the woman who owns the shelter is vegetarian?

[Reply]

Julie (A Case of the Runs)     at 9:18 am

Sounds like a nice visit. I am too afraid to say anything when people can just go from seeing pigs to eating bacon. I’ve been vegetarian (occasional fish) for over seven years, and as much as I want to just tell people to stop eating meat (or so much of it), I just have to set an example.

On a cooking show the other day, a guy was at a farm and just drew on a pig with marker to show what kinds of cuts you can get from it. I mean, really?!! This is why I don’t eat meat — plus, I’ve seen killing (of chickens) firsthand as an adolescent, so that kind of started it off for me.

[Reply]

Dukebdc     at 9:25 am

What a beautiful post about a beautiful place. All those pigs who get to live the rest of their lives in comfort, without abuse and mistreatment. I “knew” an ornery, stubborn, yet adorable pot-bellied pig for a few years. He was smart enough to open the latched screen door and let himself into the house!

I’ve been a vegetarian for 13 years, but consistently hesitate to talk about my reasons and motivations for the reasons you mention. I think educated consumers can eat meat if they choose, but hope that the connection is made between the live animal and the meat on their dinner plate. I don’t have the guts to slaughter an animal, so (in my opinion), I would be a hypocrite to eat meat. I know people who can and do slaughter animals (through hunting or farming), and they don’t take the resulting food for granted.

Animals are not humans, and I would never argue that they are due equal rights. But as humans, we have the mental capacity to alter our diets in a way that reduces suffering and cruelty without compromising our health. That is what separates us from the animals, who operate on instinct and habit.

[Reply]

jessika Reply:

You’ve summed up so well how I feel.

And emily, it was truely lovely. As a fellow vegetarian, I find it so hard to walk that thin line of preachy and saying nothing. Of course, now I have a son and I have to defend our decision to raise him vegetarian to everyone. Come on people, why would I have my son do something that I’m morally opposed to?

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

We are asked about this all the time too!

[Reply]

jessika Reply:

Not gonna lie, I totally stole it from caitlin at healthy tipping point.

[Reply]

Ashley     at 9:48 am

I’ve been a long-time follower but this is my first time commenting…

I just wanted to say, this is a beautiful post. Thank you for sharing. :)

[Reply]

Kaci Blake     at 9:54 am

I love this post, makes me so proud to be veg. I’m going to visit one soon. =)

[Reply]

Ali @ Around the VeggieTable     at 10:25 am

Thank you so much for sharing such an amazing experience…reading this beautiful post brought tears to my eyes.

[Reply]

Erin Hack     at 10:37 am

What an amazing experience – thank you for sharing, Emily. I recently read the book “The Good, Good Pig” and highly recommend it to anyone interested in learning more about pigs. They are amazing animals and there is no need for us to be eating them! :)

[Reply]

Jennifer     at 10:43 am

How awesome, Emily! Thank you so much for sharing this with us.

[Reply]

Angela     at 10:56 am

Thanks for sharing your cool experience!

[Reply]

Sarah Crosby     at 11:20 am

Great post! As someone who eats meat, I am still constantly drawn to your blog! You approach the subject with such grace that I do not feel judged. Thank you!! I do believe that we need to know where our food comes from and demand that the animals are treated with respect and love! I do love hearing your opinions and have tried some of your yummy recipes! I am dairy free because of nursing my son and found your blog a great source for recipes and encouragement!

[Reply]

Jorge     at 11:21 am

Haha, this is such a fun post! For some reason, this part cracked me up:

“And as she rang a loud bell, we started hurling carrots through the air. As we tossed, suddenly pigs emerged from every direction.”

I picture this in such a funny way!! :)

-Jorge

[Reply]

Melissa     at 11:28 am

Thank you very much for posting your trip to the sanctuary. After reading your post I went on line and found a animal sancturay near Calgary, AB Canada (where I live) called R.A.S.T.A. I have booked a tour and will be taking my husband and 11 month old twins. Once again thanks for the great insight into sanctuaries!

[Reply]

MommyPage     at 12:03 pm

Those pigs are so cute!! And the carrots look delicious and very fresh.

[Reply]

Britt @ Better Living XoXo     at 2:37 pm

Look like you had a smelly day :P Looks like a lot of fun!! :D

[Reply]

Lindsay @ Running the Windy City     at 2:43 pm

Thank you so much for sharing this post. Like you, I stopped eating meat for health reasons but as time went on, ethics became the driving force. I loved this story and will be sharing it with many people!

[Reply]

Michelle     at 3:33 pm

I grew up on a farm, and had 2 pot bellied pigs that lived in our house like dogs. They even had their own room! Well, they shared the office. Anyway, pigs are extremely intelligent, on about the same level as a dolphin. Their close cousins with whales and hippos! What’s so sad about meat pigs, is that they are intelligent and self aware enough to comprehend what is going on. They are probably intelligent enough to want more for their lives as well (abstract thought). Whereas cows and chickens, albeit should not be subjected to factory farm conditions, probably don’t know what’s going on and can’t imagine a different way of life.

[Reply]

Christina     at 3:40 pm

This was awesome Emily!

DEFINITELY keep sharing about the ethics that drive your awesome veggie-ness. I love the approach of showing amazing healthy food as an alternative. While I’ve arrived at different conclusions about my diet after travelling a very similar path, I’m so excited to hear about yours and to read a post that has such passion!

xo Christina

[Reply]

Christina Reply:

Oh and I totally agree with you about forgetting that your choices are alternative and different.

Exact same thing happens to me with my food allergies and natural/healthy/non-corporate diet… I don’t even notice that it’s different when I live in my happy food bubble!

[Reply]

Brit     at 4:11 pm

It could be hormones but I wanted to cry while reading this post and looking at these sweet little piggies :)

I eat meat but I am one of those meat eaters who is really sensitive about where my meat is from (unfortunatley, sometimes meat is purchased with price and convienience in mind). I want to get better at purchasing meat from places who really treat animals with kindness even though they are being raised for food.

I cannot watch any cooking shows where live lobsters are being put in boiling pots of water, I could never raise my own meat, and I could never see my food alive before eating it.

I love animals so much and so it is kind of “funny” that I do eat meat. Im just really sensitive about how they are treated and even if they are treated well, I still have a hard time looking at them…..

Maybe my heart is vegetarian and my stomach isnt yet. Perhaps my heart will someday reach my stomach but I really do respect and support what you believe in. And you may not find many meat eaters who totally get your side :) I just want you to know that I am one of them :) I get it, totally :)

[Reply]

Erin @ Girl Gone Veggie     at 5:01 pm

This is one of my favorite posts you’ve ever written. I love how it is so meaningful while still being so positive. That’s a hard thing for a lot of vegetarians to do! My fiance and I are vegetarian and seeing those pigs so happy and so free made my heart smile. It reaffirms the choices I make every day. :)

[Reply]

Erin Margaret @ Bishella     at 6:41 pm

I really loved this post Emily. Beautiful & perfectly written.

I always feel like I “wish” I could be vegetarian or “just have the willpower”. I’ve started being careful with the eggs I buy. But, as I read this post all I could think about was how cute and cuddly and funny all these pigs looked. Fake bacon isn’t so bad, really. <3

[Reply]

Jaclyn @ JustJac     at 7:02 pm

wow, just wow! as a fellow vegetarian – and seattleite- i cannot wait to visit this place! :) thank you for sharing. i also wanted to say that even though i share your values of not eating meat for health, and animal reasons, i really like the way you went about presenting this to the hlb community so respectfully

[Reply]

BJ     at 8:03 am

Thank you so much for posting this, it brought a tear to my eye. What a wonderful place. I’ve been a vegetarian for 18 years and stuff like this only strengthens my commitment.

[Reply]

Jodi     at 8:12 am

LOVE THIS! I looked up an animal sanctuary near my house and am so excited to go!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

This makes me so happy! :)

[Reply]

Bri     at 9:00 am

Emily, this post is wonderful and the timing couldn’t be better. After going on a bit of a carnivore bender after being vegan for lent, my body has slowly been begging me to commit to a vegan lifestyle. I’m just finishing up reading The Kind Diet, and though that book can be a little pushy it does touch on a lot of the ethical issues that many of us fighting the transition to a committed plant based diet try not to think about. I’ve been meat free with exception of fish every now and then all summer. But last night I had sushi for dinner (my favorite meal) and felt terrible! Reading your blog has really helped my journey and everyday I move a little bit closer to being a full time vegan and your recipes have definitely helped me!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks Bri! So glad to hear it! :)

[Reply]

Shannan     at 9:05 am

This is awesome! I quickly looked to see if there were any of these around me, but no luck. :( The woes of living in the middle of nowhere! Thanks for sharing this. I think it’s a great approach to get people thinking about what is impacted when they eat meat. What a great thing, a pig sanctuary!

Shannan

[Reply]

Laura     at 9:34 am

Beautiful post! Thank you.

[Reply]

Kristen     at 9:41 am

This was a beautiful post. I am not a vegetarian but I definitely respect people that are.

I am a relatively new blog reader, so I am sorry if you have already addressed this issue- but I’ve always wondered how vegetarians with pets handle their feedings. Do you feed your pups a vegetarian diet as well? I’ve always thought that falls into a ethical gray area. It seems to me that it wouldn’t be a big deal to feed them an animal based diet just because they would be eating meat if they were left to their own devices. Is their such a thing as free-range dog food :)

It looks like you’ve addressed several vegetarian/vegan gray areas, so I’m interested to hear your thoughts!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Hey Kristen! I actually haven’t written about our dog food before, but since you asked, we actually buy vegetarian food for them as well. We did a lot of research before we switched. Science shows that cats cannot live on an omnivorous diet, but dogs can thrive on it just like people (and ours have!). We buy Nature’s Pride vegetarian formula, as well as Veg-E-Dog powder (just to make sure they get everything they need). It’s definitely a grey area!

[Reply]

Ellie @ healthy belly ellie     at 10:06 am

Those pigs are SO cute! I am so happy they are in a safe sanctuary! If only all animals had a safe sanctuary to live in!

[Reply]

Katherine     at 11:23 am

I’ve been reading your blog for a year, but this is my first comment! Thank you so much for this piece. I have been a vegetarian since age 7 (!) because my 2nd grade class took us on a field trip to a hog farm. I just couldn’t fathom how we could eat such smart, gentle creatures. My parents thought (probably hoped) it was just a phase, but 17 years later, here I am! I feel like if everyone had the opportunity to meet these animals firsthand, there would be a lot more compassion and a lot less meat consumption.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks so much for reading, Katherine!

[Reply]

Ella     at 3:39 pm

Emily, thank you for sharing your opinions in a friendly, enjoyable, even-keeled way – no snark, just calm words. Though I love animals I will always eat meat without guilt. But I appreciate the way you think and respect your views and especially the way you convey them.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks Ella! :)

[Reply]

Gabrielle     at 7:04 pm

Great post, as all the others have said, but I have to add that if I hadn’t seen videos of animals suffering while confined prior to slaughter, and being slaughtered, I’d still be eating them. Some people need to see the horrors to be truly affected. That said, it was someone who showed me how amazingly varied and delicious vegan food can be, Gail Davis, who inspired me to go vegan after finally going vegetarian. This extra push was done kindly and gently, with a plea to my taste buds. But the initial impetus was seeing the gory stuff. To each her own, really.

I used to love pork, but now I love pigs. :)

[Reply]

Michelle     at 5:33 am

I don’t comment a ton but I’m a long time reader and 16 year vegetarian. This post really struck a note with me because I too, went veggie for health concerns but it’s the ethical reasons that keep me eating this way. I am hesitant to talk about it with people I don’t know well, lest people assume I’m judging them for eating meat or I’m some crazy, scare tactic vegetarian. I guess I don’t really have a point here other then to say thank you for so beautifully articulating why I also choose to remain meat free.

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

I totally understand!

[Reply]

Christina     at 8:06 am

“I would much rather show all the delicious food that is available to vegetarians, and hope to entice people to eat more plant-based meals by leading a healthy, happy example.”

And this is one of many reasons yours is my favorite veggie blog. I eat an 80% meat free diet. The only meat I do eat is form Whole Foods and scores high on the 5 Step Animal Welfare rating scale. In all honesty I hope to even cut all that out one day.

Long story short, I was a complete vegeterian from age 9 to 20 (of my own choice, the rest of my family ate meat). My choice was made only out of my love of animals. While I have never been a big meat eater to begin with, I really hope to again be on a completely meat free diet by the end of the year. Your blog keeps me motivated and is a constant reminder that a diet without meat can still be a very delicious and varied one! I don’t need/like gory images of slaughterhouses and have always sincerely appreciated you not using those low guilt tactics.

A great veg resource, cute dogs, and then add that adorable Cullen and what’s not to like!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Thanks so much, Christina!

[Reply]

Stacy     at 10:42 am

First, this is by far my favorite post that you’ve ever done. I’ve been a vegetarian for the past 12 years but it wasn’t until I took home a pig from the Humane Society where I work that I truly fell in love with them. Caring for Priscilla for 8 years was a rewarding experience and a wonderful way to learn more about them.

I’ve been leaning towards vegan and I’m curious how you feel about other items (shoes, etc.). I’ve been vegetarian for a long time but still have multiple leather goods and I’m just curious on your opinion.

Thanks for the wonderful post!

[Reply]

Emily Malone Reply:

Very cool, Stacy! Priscilla was so lucky to find you!

[Reply]

Mary @ Veganfully Me     at 2:20 pm

Love this post! I just got to visit The Gentle Barn in Southern California and it was such a wonderful experience!

[Reply]

JL     at 3:28 pm

Love this! Farm sanctuaries place us face to face with that which could have ended up on our plate. Visiting sanctuaries that save dairy cows and chickens also helps put cheese and eggs into perspective. The amount of suffering, years and years, that female farmed animals experience is horrific. I’ll take cashew “cheese” any day! Glad you have such a profound experience!

[Reply]

Alex @ Raw Recovery     at 8:53 am

Aww I want to go there!! I love, love, love piggies. They are so cute and not many people know how smart they actually are. I love animal sanctuaries and hope to have one someday. It’s my mom’s dream for sure!

[Reply]

Christina     at 11:19 pm

So yeah… when I saw this title I read it as a peace sanctuary for visiting pigs. When I read the piece it made slightly more sense.

[Reply]

Orla     at 5:40 am

I became a vegetarian 2+ years ago for health reasons but I am finding more and more that ethics are also cementing my decision to continue to not eat meat. I also find myself not eating eggs unless at home as I can’t be sure that the restaurant etc has questioned where they came from in the same way I do at home.I am also dairy free- mainly for health reasons as it triggers my asthma.
It is hard to be the only non meat eater in my family & following a weeks vacation with them I found that they were the ones making the most noise about my diet. I never once would attempt to “inform” someone about the abuse & inhumanity animals suffer in order to satiate their palate. That is something they chose to ignore. That is not my place. I am happy with my decision and once I am that is all that matters. Thanks for posting about this idyllic place for the pigs. I swear they all look like they are smiling!

[Reply]

Denise     at 3:12 pm

Question? Is there a certain protein amount I should shoot for if I decide to go vegetarian and dairy free? I’m afraid without the dairy that I won’t get enough protein, and I’m curious if you kept count at first. There is a huge discrepancy about how much protein a person needs, and I’d like to know your thoughts on this. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

[Reply]

So I Guess I'm a Pescatarian Now? | Girl Gone Veggie     at 11:11 pm

[...] for health reasons a lot of the ethical reasons started to really resonate with me along the way. (This post really struck a cord.) But the research I kept on reading about fish in my quest to understand more about health made me [...]

TrackBack URI

Leave a comment

(required)

(required)




    Welcome.

    A resource for healthy recipes, cooking tips, and inspiration for active living. Welcome!

    @DailyGarnish

    On Babble.

    On Facebook.

    On Twitter.

    Favorite Things

    On My Recipage.

    Categories




© 2014 Daily Garnish
All content is protected by copyright. Please do not reproduce in any form.
Blog design by Splendid Sparrow